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Best way to hookup a hotel?


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24 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   wessel40

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 12:14 PM

What is the best way to hookup a hotel with 30 units. All the runs are in one location. What equipment setup is the best. Using all single tuner receivers.

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#2 OFFLINE   matt

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 12:32 PM

I don't know the details, but I think BattleZone does them. They call them headends.
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#3 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 12:33 PM

Hire a commercial installer either from a local AV specialist or low voltage electrical shop...

Single dish with its 4 leads terminating in some form of a head end cabinet where the leads to all the rooms originate.

Generally the 4 leads are split (cascaded) to 2 (or more) powered multiswitches (to compensate for signal loss on the long cable runs). May require some signal correction and amplification prior to the cascade point.

http://www.sonoradesign.com/

The link may lead you to some installation schematics you might find handy...

I only know this stuff as a consumer with a large home and I had my infrastructure built out as a commercial install and then the D* installers merely align the dish.

Don "love it when I hit a hotel that has the same programming I'm used to" Bolton

What is the best way to hookup a hotel with 30 units. All the runs are in one location. What equipment setup is the best. Using all single tuner receivers.


What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#4 OFFLINE   Tom Servo

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:21 PM

Out of curiosity, is this planned to have the receivers in the bedrooms, or stacked in a back room and feeding a conventional headend?

I don't think I've ever stayed in a hotel with satellite boxes in the rooms, but a few that have had Dish run through the place (I know because all the channels went out in a storm.)

#5 OFFLINE   n3ntj

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 03:13 PM

When I first read the OP, I thought it was called "Best way to hook-up at a hotel". I did a double-take. D'oh!
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#6 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 04:32 PM

So it wasn't just me then:grin:

Don "the other missile launched entertainment system" Bolton

When I first read the OP, I thought it was called "Best way to hook-up at a hotel". I did a double-take. D'oh!


Edited by lugnutathome, 10 August 2010 - 04:38 PM.

What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#7 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 04:37 PM

You are right. My brief outline would serve an apt dwelling where there were multiple residential accounts off of one house service.

The missing piece would be a unit at the head end that would rebroadcast a subset of the Sat channels over std cable frequencies. I don't know if such devices have Sat tuners onboard or require a physical box per channel.

But yeah now that you mention it, I don't recall seeing any sat receivers at the places that had D*...

Don "there be some money involved in all that" Bolton

Out of curiosity, is this planned to have the receivers in the bedrooms, or stacked in a back room and feeding a conventional headend?

I don't think I've ever stayed in a hotel with satellite boxes in the rooms, but a few that have had Dish run through the place (I know because all the channels went out in a storm.)


What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#8 OFFLINE   JoeTheDragon

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 04:54 PM

Out of curiosity, is this planned to have the receivers in the bedrooms, or stacked in a back room and feeding a conventional headend?

I don't think I've ever stayed in a hotel with satellite boxes in the rooms, but a few that have had Dish run through the place (I know because all the channels went out in a storm.)


Pro:Idiom seems to be the new way HD tv in hotel I think bell tv has systems like replicating a box in each room.


http://www.lodgemart.com/noname10.html

http://lgcommercial....chive&category=

http://www.pdisat.co...y_PDISAT_08.pdf

also more hear

http://www.directv.c...ssetId=P6500009
I want CLTV / CLTV HD on direct tv.

#9 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:16 PM

The price [$1.00] seems to be very attractive. :) If you'll plan 250 channels ...

#10 OFFLINE   JoeTheDragon

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:42 PM

Found some more stuff it looks like they make smaller cards as well. But how does it work for part time channels like over flows and sub feeds that are shared with ppv on D*?

http://www.lgsolutio...prise&category=

http://lgcommercial....y 040913_PR.pdf

http://lgcommercial....y_040913_PR.pdf
I want CLTV / CLTV HD on direct tv.

#11 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 09:16 PM

For a hotel, there are 3 basic solutions:

- A receiver in each room (this is becoming more popular, believe it or not).
- A standard-def head-end system.
- An HD head-end system.

The receiver in each room solution is straightforward: use a bunch of switches and one or more dishes to feed them, and hook up the boxes. Hotel/motels will all have catalogs from industry suppliers that they can purchase lock-boxes for the receivers from, which I recommend.

A SD head-end system uses a bunch of basic DirecTV or Dish Network satellite receivers (one per channel on the system) hooked up to the same number of RF modulators. Here are some pics:

Posted Image
36-channel DirecTV-based system using standard modulators (standard mods take a lot more rack space, but include signal amplification and cost a lot less). 35 DirecTV channels plus one channel for the customer-supplied VHS/DVD combo player. This pic was taken before the installation was complete - we hadn't anchored the racks down, installed the system monitor TV (the shelf on the right), or done final cable neatening, but you get the idea.


Posted Image
Installation of a Dish Network-based system using mini-modulators. These save a lot of rack space, and in many installations, space is at a premium. But they require active cooling (see the rack-mounted fans) and *require* a launch amplifier as they output a low-strength signal only. They are also quite a bit more expensive.


Posted Image
Another Dish/mini-mod-based system. This one has 42 channels: 40 Dish channels, a DVD player, and a computer with a program that loops things like daily events, daily menus, and so forth. It's in a convalescent hospital, but it could easily be a unit with a custom TV guide.



Then, there are HD head-end systems. Well, really, there's only one kind: Pro:Idiom, as JoeTheDragon linked to. See, with digital/HD content, the content-providers require encrypted distribution of their programming, which means that you can't just use any TV. You can only use TVs that either have Pro:Idiom decoders built-in or will accept a Pro:Idiom decoder card.

The problem with most hotel/motels is they first go out and buy a bunch of new HDTVs, pay to have them installed, and only then decide that their SD head-end system isn't cutting it on their HDTVs, which are usually much larger than the SD CRT TVs they replace. Then they learn that Pro:Idiom isn't compatible with the cheap HDTVs they bought, and end up passing on upgrading their system to HD because they refuse to replace their brand new TVs.

Anyway, with a Pro:Idiom head-end, you are distributing encrypted QAM channels that are decoded in the TV set using the Pro:Idiom circuits *and* the TV's encryption system (the same one that handles HDMI decryption). So distribution is over standard coax. If you can get to the hotel/motel before they've bought new TVs, and they have enough money to invest up-front, these systems are pretty nice, though they require more work than a SD head-end to set up and debug. Needless to say, they are quite expensive up-front, but they will be in use a LONG time, and the total monthly price will be much lower than HD cable to each room.

If you have questions, let me know.

#12 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:06 PM

- A receiver in each room (this is becoming more popular, believe it or not).


Is this less costly than a Pro:idiom if they are going HD? Upfront and recurring monthly?

#13 OFFLINE   wessel40

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:11 PM

Whats the best way to just use dishes and switches to hook up 30 Directv H24 receivers. Put the receivers in the rooms. There is a total of 30 rooms, one tv per room. Its a cheap hotel and want the most cost effective way.

#14 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:42 PM

http://www.dbstalk.c...66&d=1265395051

One dish, two SWM16s and 30 D12s or H24s, depending. Will support 32 tuners total across the 4 SWM outputs (8 tuners per output, max), plus another 4 receivers from the second SWM16's legacy ports.

#15 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:48 PM

Is this less costly than a Pro:idiom if they are going HD? Upfront and recurring monthly?


Like all things, it depends. A head-end system will have fewer channels total, but will give end-users a simpler interface (using the TV's tuner to change channels and having only the available channels programmed in) and makes for fewer problems for the hotel, since guests can't get to the receivers.

Receivers in rooms allows more channels and a lower up-front cost if the room count is low, but you have to mitigate problems with guests messing with the receivers or having trouble understanding a satellite receiver. The front desk will get lots of support calls from guests confused that the TV itself isn't changing channels, or that they have a bunch of channels that they don't get, or they can't find their favorite channel, etc.

Generally, the higher the room count, the cheaper a head-end system is in the long run, though installation costs will be higher. For 30 rooms, receivers in the rooms will be cheaper.

Edited by BattleZone, 10 August 2010 - 11:05 PM.


#16 OFFLINE   matt

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:50 PM

Wow, 30 H24s... what a dream!
Slimline 5 with SWM-16
Wireless DECA
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R22-200 Leased
Owned H25-700 and H24-700 off and packed for the move.

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#17 OFFLINE   Tom Servo

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 04:13 AM

Sorry to piggyback on the OP's question but this has been a very enlightening thread. I've always wondered how hotels did this sort of thing.

The last hotel I stayed in with HDTVs indeed had standard sets, but with cable. CableONE, actually, just like what's available where I live (and all the more reason to go satellite). I did a rescan on the TV for fun and found all the "hidden" QAM locals in the clear. Got to watch them in HD. Nice.

My experience has been, so far, that exactly zero HDTVs I've encountered in hotels have had HD feeds of any kind available. So whatever this small motel OP is doing is A-OK in my book. :)

#18 OFFLINE   matt

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 04:35 AM

I was just browsing around on the D* website because I was wondering if you had to pay $5 for each box, and I found this:

Prisons
Subscriber units for prisons and correctional facilities are calculated by a total number of cable drops connected to DIRECTV System network.


If I ever go to prison, I better get AMC HD in my cell or I'm gonna be pissed. :D
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#19 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 06:55 AM

My experience has been, so far, that exactly zero HDTVs I've encountered in hotels have had HD feeds of any kind available.


That's because, as I mentioned earlier, almost no one considers HD programming needs until AFTER they've bought a bunch of (non-Pro:Idiom-compatible) HDTVs, and then they aren't willing to buy the TVs they'd need for HD. :eek2:

#20 OFFLINE   Carl Spock

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 07:16 AM

Best way to hookup a hotel?

Find a pretty girl in the hotel's bar. Start buying her drinks and maybe dinner.



...oh, not that kind of hookup.

Never mind.
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