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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Sling Adapter: 722 must be connected to my DSL?


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28 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   sremick

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 02:13 PM

BTW, MUST the Homeplug Ethernet Adapter be plugged directly into a wall outlet (and not a power strip)? I may have misunderstood. Thanks.


Yes, unless the surge protector is certified Homeplug-compatible.

The network signal is sent along the power wiring as intentional "noise" which will be filtered out by any standard surge suppressor worth anything. Of course, plugging your Homeplug adapter directly into the wall gives an unprotected path into your equipment and negates any other power protection you might be using.

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#22 OFFLINE   dale001

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 05:44 PM

must the DVR (which is downstairs) also be connected into the wall and NOT a surge protector?

As of now, i can't get my sling adapter to even light up its power button.

Dale

#23 OFFLINE   klang

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 05:58 PM

I believe you have to have successfully run through the network configuration on the DVR before plugging in the Sling Adapter.

#24 OFFLINE   dale001

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 06:01 PM

my TV pops open a menu that says it has detected sling adapter, but no light comes on, on the adapter and when i run through the menus/broadband system setup, no connectivity is discovered, even after hitting reset.

#25 OFFLINE   dale001

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 07:15 PM

The power cord from DVR must NOT go into a surge protector---it now works.

cool beans.

#26 OFFLINE   sremick

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 06:55 AM

The power cord from DVR must NOT go into a surge protector---it now works.

cool beans.


You live a lot more-dangerously than I would. A surge coming in through that could blow your DVR, then travel through the AV cables and blow the TV, the AVR, the DVD/BD player... and anything else connected.

How do I know? I've seen it happen. More than once. Once time even then went out into the phone lines and blew other equipment connected to the phone line.

#27 OFFLINE   Ray C@DISH Network

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 11:26 AM

If you are using the Homeplug solution for your Internet connection to the receiver, the receiver and router have to be on the same circuit otherwise you won't get that connectivity.

The wireless adapter would work. I have my 722 setup with the wireless adapter connected at the receiver in my basement and the router on the 2nd floor.

#28 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 04:57 PM

You live a lot more-dangerously than I would. A surge coming in through that could blow your DVR, then travel through the AV cables and blow the TV, the AVR, the DVD/BD player... and anything else connected.

How do I know? I've seen it happen. More than once. Once time even then went out into the phone lines and blew other equipment connected to the phone line.


To be honest... most "surge protectors" really aren't anything of the sort anyway. Most are just simple power conditioners that will help smooth out noise and help you with minor brownouts or surges... but a major surge, like a lightning strike, will jump across most "surge protectors" in most people's homes. They are just feel-good devices, and yeah I use some of them anyway :)

The only safe way to protect your electronics would be to go around the house and unplug them when not in use... but that would be insane to manage and render many devices useless when they are most needed.

A really close lightning strike can actually induct enough of a charge that you don't even have to be hit directly to suffer damage. We had a TV partially fried in just such a scenario.

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#29 OFFLINE   sremick

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 07:51 AM

To be honest... most "surge protectors" really aren't anything of the sort anyway. Most are just simple power conditioners that will help smooth out noise and help you with minor brownouts or surges... but a major surge, like a lightning strike, will jump across most "surge protectors" in most people's homes. They are just feel-good devices, and yeah I use some of them anyway :)

The only safe way to protect your electronics would be to go around the house and unplug them when not in use... but that would be insane to manage and render many devices useless when they are most needed.

A really close lightning strike can actually induct enough of a charge that you don't even have to be hit directly to suffer damage. We had a TV partially fried in just such a scenario.


Oh, I don't disagree. However, all my surge protectors are valued at at least $50 and up. I also have several UPSes and if I'm home during the storm, I do unplug. I do know that they are only a certain level of protection, regardless, and given what lightning is it will pass through anything if it strikes close enough. However, from my experience in the business I've seen undeniable evidence that they do and can help in many, many situations. I used to work in a retail computer shop for 10 years and any time a big lightning storm came through, the next couple days we had a surge (pun intended) of people coming in with issues. Almost without fail, when we asked them if they had a surge protector they would say "no" (or if they said "yes", it'd turn out they didn't have everything plugged into it, or missed something like the phone line). Then there were a much, much smaller handful of people for whom the surge protector acted as a "fuse" of sorts, by self-destructing rather than letting the surge into the equipment (better to replace a $30-50 surge protector than a $1000+ computer). They are designed to do this. The connected equipment survived without damage.

I'm not going to discredit my anecdotal experience by making up guessed statistics. However, the above scenario was basically without fail for my 10 years there. They are not magical, impervious armor... but they definitely, without question, help.




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