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Guest Message by DevFuse

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4k Receivers?


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45 replies to this topic

#41 OFFLINE   Davenlr

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 03:54 PM

4K and 8K should make Hollywood happy. Take a long time to torrent a movie at 8K.

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#42 OFFLINE   kevinturcotte

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 03:56 PM

4K and 8K should make Hollywood happy. Take a long time to torrent a movie at 8K.


Not at school! We get 90 Mbps down and up in the library lol (Not that I'd pirate a movie, and certainly not using the school's internet)

#43 ONLINE   P Smith

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:05 PM

I'm talking about local OTA channels.


There was a mention of using two 6 MHz channels for 4K and perhaps 8K with new compression algos and perhaps new modulation instead of 8VSB.

#44 OFFLINE   kevinturcotte

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:05 PM

There was a mention of using two 6 MHz channels for 4K and perhaps 8K with new compression algos and perhaps new modulation instead of 8VSB.


Switching to MPEG-4 would help as well.

#45 ONLINE   P Smith

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:29 PM

Switching to MPEG-4 would help as well.


Only today only for tests 4K transmitting as no new H.2XX standard developed not telling about equipment...

One 6 MHz channel with 8VSB modulation giving max rate 19.2 Mbps is not enough for 4x pixel's count with current H.264 or VC-1 compression.
Perhaps static picture or FR = 7.5 fps. :)

#46 ONLINE   P Smith

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 10:57 AM

Latest news, a new label is settled to "Ultra HD":

On August 23, 2012, UHDTV was officially approved as a standard by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), standardizing both 4K and 8K resolutions for the format in ITU-R Recommendation BT.2020 (Rec. 2020).[1][43]

On September 15, 2012, David Wood, Deputy Director of the EBU Technology and Development Department (who chairs the ITU working group that created Rec. 2020), told The Hollywood Reporter that Korea plans to begin test broadcasts of 4K UHDTV next year.[44][45][46] Wood also said that many broadcasters have the opinion that going from HDTV to 8K UHDTV is too much of a leap and that it would be better to start with 4K UHDTV.[44] In the same article Masakazu Iwaki, NHK Research senior manager, said that the NHK plan to go with 8K UHDTV is for economic reasons since directly going to 8K UHDTV would avoid an additional transition from 4K UHDTV to 8K UHDTV.[44]

On October 18, 2012, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) announced that it had been unanimously agreed on by a vote of the CEA’s Board of Industry Leaders that the term "Ultra High-Definition", or “Ultra HD", would be used for displays that have a resolution of at least 8 megapixels with a vertical resolution of at least 2,160 pixels and a horizontal resolution of at least 3,840 pixels.[5][47][48] The Ultra HD label also requires the display to have an aspect ratio of at least 16x9 and to have at least one digital input that can carry and present a native video signal of 3840x2160 without having to rely solely on a video scaler.[5][47][48] Sony announced that their 4K products will be marketed as "4K Ultra High-Definition (4K UHD)".[49]


http://en.wikipedia....tion_television




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