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Seeking advice: Is damage claim process with DirecTV worth the trouble?


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61 replies to this topic

#51 OFFLINE   bobcamp1

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 08:23 PM

It doesn't take an Electrical Engineer. It takes some small research and knowing how to read.

Fact is a 20-30 Amp wire will not support 150,000 amps.!


I have an M.S. in EE. You are correct. :)

Actually, that wire should instantly vaporize or at least melt if it did attempt to carry most of that energy. And then where would the rest of the energy of that strike go?

You can use #26 AWG wire as long as it is also 1.5" wide. But most building codes don't recognize that, so you have to use 1/2" braided copper wire, give or take 1/16".

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#52 OFFLINE   bobcamp1

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 08:33 PM

I doubt that anybody is suggesting that a ground wire will protect against a direct hit. The issue is whether or not bleeding the static charge from the dish reduces the risk of attracting a direct strike. I've found opinions arguing both ways.


Grounding the dish slightly INCREASES the chance of a direct strike. The presence of a relatively microscopic static charge has absolutely nothing to do with attracting lightning.

Besides, if the dish is installed correctly minus the ground wire, there is probably no static charge on it. The dish is still grounded because it's in contact with the LNA, and the LNA is grounded via the shielding in the cables. That shielding is then hopefully tied to house ground within the receiver.

But hey, if the OP can get someone to pay for it, more power to him (sorry about the pun).

#53 OFFLINE   bigglebowski

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 09:28 PM

Grounding the dish slightly INCREASES the chance of a direct strike. The presence of a relatively microscopic static charge has absolutely nothing to do with attracting lightning.

Besides, if the dish is installed correctly minus the ground wire, there is probably no static charge on it. The dish is still grounded because it's in contact with the LNA, and the LNA is grounded via the shielding in the cables. That shielding is then hopefully tied to house ground within the receiver.

But hey, if the OP can get someone to pay for it, more power to him (sorry about the pun).


Uh oh, its like you are being blasphemous by what you speak of. Also btw, I DO NOT disagree with what you say, im just pointing out that most people just dont fully "get" what grounding is about.

Also LNA, wow had not heard that in a while. I seem to remember the C-Band ones were huge. Then again the cable was too, as well as the separate block downconverters the "newer" equipment needed. Cant remember what the cable type was though, remember them using N connectors.

#54 OFFLINE   HobbyTalk

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 06:36 AM

Also LNA, wow had not heard that in a while. I seem to remember the C-Band ones were huge. Then again the cable was too, as well as the separate block downconverters the "newer" equipment needed. Cant remember what the cable type was though, remember them using N connectors.


Early BUDs had separate DCs. The signal coming out of the LNA was 950Mhz to 1450Mhz so RG-11 was used to connect the LNA to the DC.
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#55 OFFLINE   bigglebowski

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 07:40 AM

Early BUDs had separate DCs. The signal coming out of the LNA was 950Mhz to 1450Mhz so RG-11 was used to connect the LNA to the DC.


You made me look it up. The coax was rg-213 WAY thicker than rg-11 because it was not block converting to 950-1450Mhz hence the need for thicker cable.

#56 OFFLINE   damondlt

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 09:30 AM

Grounding the dish slightly INCREASES the chance of a direct strike. The presence of a relatively microscopic static charge has absolutely nothing to do with attracting lightning.

Besides, if the dish is installed correctly minus the ground wire, there is probably no static charge on it. The dish is still grounded because it's in contact with the LNA, and the LNA is grounded via the shielding in the cables. That shielding is then hopefully tied to house ground within the receiver.

But hey, if the OP can get someone to pay for it, more power to him (sorry about the pun).

Thank you. Glad you could explain it better.

:lol:

I think grounding is important for many factors with equipment.
But Lightning, nope it doesn't take Direct or indirect strikes to fry equipment. Best defence unplug your electric and cables and stop being lazy and expecting someone else to pay for it all the time.

If your dish is hit you might want to call the fire department!

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#57 OFFLINE   Jon J

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:17 AM

Also LNA, wow had not heard that in a while. I seem to remember the C-Band ones were huge.

Especially if you got a "Super Ice" from Satellite Shouty. ;)
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#58 OFFLINE   bobcamp1

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:36 AM

Also LNA, wow had not heard that in a while. I seem to remember the C-Band ones were huge. Then again the cable was too, as well as the separate block downconverters the "newer" equipment needed. Cant remember what the cable type was though, remember them using N connectors.


That's because I meant to type LNB. not LNA. :D That's just my work life creeping into this forum.

My point was that there's metal to metal contact so that the dish and its LNB are grounded even without the ground wire, just not in an optimal way. The ground wire running from the dish to ground is just a dedicated connection to ground, and is the optimal way to ground a dish. I can tell you that it's not needed for proper functioning of the equipment, nor does it have any measurable impact on lightning or surge protection.

You ground the dish because you don't want an installer standing on the roof or on a 20' ladder getting an unexpected zap when he touches the dish. Surprises in those situations are bad.

Edited by bobcamp1, 04 June 2012 - 10:47 AM.


#59 ONLINE   studechip

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:20 AM

Especially if you got a "Super Ice" from Satellite Shouty. ;)


You must mean Gary Cubeta!

#60 OFFLINE   Jon J

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 12:39 PM

You must mean Gary Cubeta!

I don't remember his name just that he was hawking equipment 24/7. ;)
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#61 OFFLINE   jimconnor

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:08 PM

Just to close the loop on this thread, I wanted to let anyone interested know that DirecTV (actually their installation sub-contractor) is paying my claim in full. They are paying the repair costs for two televisions and replacement cost for one that could not be repaired. They also replaced the HR34 that got fried in the incident (my Protection Plan would have covered that either way, I think).

It was determined that not grounding the dish (which doesn't follow electrical code in my state) was enough to obligate them to pay without any real questions.

If you ever need to file a claim, just be sure to have lots of pictures and details about dates/events. If you provide them with all the information up front, they really don't ask too many questions.

Thanks to those that provided helpful feedback on the original question posted.

#62 ONLINE   studechip

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:13 PM

I'm glad it worked out for you. I doubt the lack of a ground was the cause of the problem, but since they should have installed it correctly in the first place, it really was the right thing for them to do.




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