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Google's Doodle honors the first drive-in theater


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#1 OFFLINE   phrelin

phrelin

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 04:59 PM

For movie trivia buffs, this story:

Google's video homage to the drive-in theater (click on the movie ticket to watch) embodies the concept at its peak in the 1950s, when more that 5,000 drive-in movie theaters dotted the American landscape.

On June 6, 1933, Richard Hollingshead Jr. opened the first drive-in theater on Crescent Boulevard in Camden, New Jersey. Except he didn't call it a drive-in theater. That came later. He called it the "park-in" movie theater. The cost for a ticket: 25 cents per vehicle and 25 cents per person.

While the number of drive-in theaters in the US has dwindled to 366, according to the United Drive-in Theaters Association, there's something of a DIY revival today that echoes Mr. Hollingshead's own early tests in his driveway at 212 Thomas Avenue in Camden, New Jersey. Hollingshead used a 1928 Kodak projector to show home movies on a screen hanging between two trees in his yard.


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