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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Onkyo Receiver Wattage


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5 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   kevinturcotte

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:08 PM

I have an Onkyo TX-NR5007 A/V receiver. I've attached a pic from the manual. Is this REALLY what it's drawing for power?!?! If so, I assume that's probably Blu-Ray only, 1080p, Dolby True HD/DTS HD-Master 9.1? Any idea ABOUT what wattage it would draw without the speakers connected, and using it only as an HDMI switch/video converter/enhancer?

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#2 OFFLINE   Cholly

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 07:17 PM

If yoou really want to know the power draw, get yourself a Kill-A-Watt EZ. It's a handy digital power meter that you can get from Lowe's or Amazon, amongst others. You should be able to find it for around $25.

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#3 OFFLINE   Carl Spock

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:50 AM

That looks about right.

The source makes no difference regarding your amp's power consumption. An amplifier is a strange device. It isn't like a car which uses no gas when it's parked in the garage. A better analogy is an escalator. It's running whether there are any people on it or not. Yes, an escalator's motors will draw more current when it's loaded with the weight of people but not that much more. The same thing is true with an amp. It uses 70-80% of its full power consumption even at idle, and in a home theater set-up, make that power consumption times five. It gets even worse. If your amp is a seven channel amp and you only have five speakers hooked up to it, it's still running all seven channels. You are powering two channels of amplification you aren't even using.

As for the last line of your attachment, Kevin, one of the basic electronic formulas is P = I x E, or power equals current times voltage. If your amp is drawing 11.8 amps of current, which is high but not outrageously so as I have an amp that also draws that much current, multiply that by 115 volts of AC power. You end up with 1357 watts of power consumed, which is more than the spec.
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#4 OFFLINE   kevinturcotte

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:55 AM

Wow! And we pay like 15 cents per kwh. That is mental!

#5 OFFLINE   Shades228

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 09:43 PM

Wow! And we pay like 15 cents per kwh. That is mental!


This is the same reason that people who put huge stereo systems in their cars wonder why they burn out alternators and batteries without doing specific things. The day I see a "Green" amp is the day I know marketing has gone too far.
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#6 OFFLINE   Gloria_Chavez

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:23 PM

As for the last line of your attachment, Kevin, one of the basic electronic formulas is P = I x E, or power equals current times voltage. If your amp is drawing 11.8 amps of current, which is high but not outrageously so as I have an amp that also draws that much current, multiply that by 115 volts of AC power. You end up with 1357 watts of power consumed, which is more than the spec.


That takes me back to AP Physics. Then I went to one week of Physics 51 in college, dropped the course, and realized I was going to be a fuzzy.
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