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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Quick Help on cut cable... what to do!!


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10 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   StangGT909

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 08:46 AM

First off.... I have the protection plan and have never called for a dish alignment or anything.

I have a dish in my backyard with a buried cable running to my house.

I'm having a deck put in today and told the buys to un-bury it and move it and in the process of pull it out, it appears it got trapped under a tree root and when they pulled too hard the cable snapped.

1) Would directv fix this for free under the protection plan?

2) Would you tell them you have a damaged cable, or just say you are having "signal issues"

3) Or, should I just fix it myself? My first thought was no, I don't want to degrade my signal but actually it goes from the 1) LNB, 2) block outside house 3) green label splitter 4) multswitch, 5) cable that leads into the wall downstairs, 6) upstairs jack, 7) receiver. *Would 1 more connection cause any issue?

4) Would you have any concern in putting two new coax cable ends on the cut cable, and putting a barrel couple in the middle, maybe wrapping it with electrical tape to protect from water, and burying it?

5) I don't have a cable crimper, would you recommend something like this?
http://www.homedepot...51#BVRRWidgetID


Quick help would be really appreciated!!! If I'm calling I want to do it asap, but if anyone would say the quick splice would do just fine, I'll save the hassle and plan on having TV this weekend

...Ads Help To Support This SIte...

#2 OFFLINE   eakes

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:04 AM

DO NOT put connectors on the cable at the break, add barrel connector, tape the joint and bury - you are asking for trouble. Do it right, get a new length of cable (suitable for burial) and replace the entire cable between LNB and house entry. Better yet, bury PVC type electrical conduit and place your new coax in that. Make the entrance and exit of coax to conduit above ground using elbows and boxes to keep water out of the conduit.

As a temporary fix to restore service while you trench in the conduit and run new cable, the splice you suggest is OK, but it is not a permanent fix.

This is not a repair I would expect Directv to make free of change with or without the (useless) protection plan.

#3 OFFLINE   StangGT909

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:10 AM

Are you worried that the signal would be degraded? Or that over the winter it could become damaged? I don't want to do this is it will fail, but I don't want to over complicate it.

#4 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:19 AM

A temporary fix would not degrade signal enough to be concerned about. However, any connection is a point of vulnerability over time. Moisture getting in will cause problems. That is why you don't want to put connectors at the break. No matter how well you try to seal it, chances are good you will eventually have problems. So just replace the entire piece of coax and save yourself future problems.

#5 OFFLINE   bigglebowski

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:22 AM

DO NOT put connectors on the cable at the break, add barrel connector, tape the joint and bury - you are asking for trouble. Do it right, get a new length of cable (suitable for burial) and replace the entire cable between LNB and house entry. Better yet, bury PVC type electrical conduit and place your new coax in that. Make the entrance and exit of coax to conduit above ground using elbows and boxes to keep water out of the conduit.

As a temporary fix to restore service while you trench in the conduit and run new cable, the splice you suggest is OK, but it is not a permanent fix.

This is not a repair I would expect Directv to make free of change with or without the (useless) protection plan.


This is what I was going to suggest, contact someone in your area about getting them to cut you a piece of "burial" or "flooded" coax so you can just drop in the replacement. Since the old line was pulled on and stretched the cut is not the only problem.

Also the tool you posted is wrong and people on this site would be very upset to see you using hex crimped connections. Black tape burial is asking for trouble too, at the least a nice wrapping of rubber tape would be better. When we bury hardline cable heat shrink tubing that has a glue in it is what is used and gives a watertight seal. This may not be available in the correct size in town.

#6 OFFLINE   StangGT909

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:28 AM

I had just though of using the shrink wrap tubing... that's a good idea.

I'm not familiar with crimping tools... what should I use that would be available at home depot or lowes?

#7 OFFLINE   bigglebowski

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:38 AM

I had just though of using the shrink wrap tubing... that's a good idea.

I'm not familiar with crimping tools... what should I use that would be available at home depot or lowes?


Compression crimp tool, they run $60-80 at local stores.

#8 OFFLINE   Newshawk

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 09:48 AM

I second the advice about getting a compression fitting tool set. There are ones you can find at the home improvement stores for under $60, but if you are going to do this type of maintenance yourself, the higher quality tools would be worth the investment.

I also second the suggestion to run a PVC conduit for the buried cable. This might help you avoid a custom charge in the future if the cable needs to be replaced again. As for bringing the ends up above ground, make sure the openings point down to prevent rainwater from filling the conduit. Even with using a conduit, I'd use only cable rated for burial and compression fittings on both ends.

DIRECTV employee April 2004-November 2012.
The above comments are my own because I don't know if anyone would care about my opinions anymore.


#9 OFFLINE   StangGT909

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 10:07 AM

I appreciate the quick advice.

I was afraid a service call would not be until mid next week and I needed a backup plan to avoid missing watching baseball all weekend.

I gave them a call and they said it's not covered under the protection plan, as expected but that they would run an all new cable from the dish to the hook up at my house for $49 with the cable included (but won't bury it).

When you start talking about $60+ tools, I think it just makes sense to have them come out for $50 and run an all new cable. If I start messing with the LNB to hook up a new wire, who knows if I would move it out of alignment.

I'm kind of surprised that they'll be here already tomorrow at 12 PM, but hey that's great.

I'm sure as a professional the $60 cable tool is great, but I'm still confused at why the $10-20 one couldn't "get the job done" to just do a 1-time crimp.

I'm sure the outside lines that DTV crimped were done with a high end tool, but I'm positive that in my 10 years of having directv that I've used "odds and ends" cable wires between the jack and the receive in one room or another that were crimped using something less qualified and I've never had an issue.

Oh well we'll be back up tomorrow. I guess I'll find a good book tonight. Lol, I should have said I was so pissed that I missed an episode of Jersey Shore on MTV that I got mad and ripped out the cable and I want them to fix it due to the Viacom dispute...lol...right.

#10 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 10:16 AM

I appreciate the quick advice.

Having done my own buried coax a few times, have them replace the coax, but figure yourself to bury it and use the PVC conduit.

As to compression verse crimped connectors. You can get away with crimped, but really only for indoor use.
Compression seal much better so need to be used outside.
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#11 OFFLINE   David MacLeod

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 10:18 AM

if you have the trench dug and pvc there already maybe they would use it??
Dave MacLeod
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