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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Recording 1080! programs in 720p


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28 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 01:15 PM

Given the viewing conditions in most homes, it is hard to believe that many people can see a difference between 1080x1920 and 720x1280. But follow a football down field, or hockey puck across the ice, and the difference between 30fps and 60fps becomes pretty apparent.

Can't say much about the hockey puck, but the mind blends frames above 24/s and I sort of doubt someone could tell 30 from 60 in a "blind test".
Change to slow motion and I'm sure most can tell.
I will say a 720p looks fuzzy or soft, compared to a 1080i.
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#22 OFFLINE   Diana C

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 03:25 PM

Well, as you said...no single answer to any of this.

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#23 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:02 PM

So true...we feed our Panasonic Plasma native resolutions, the rest of the TVs get 1080i from the receiver, simply because we think that works best for us.

Field rate = the number of times per second the display "refreshes," or illuminates, the screen (many displays refresh the same image multiple times)
Frame rate = the number of unique images displayed per second.

Nearly all video original content is shot at 30 frames per second, while film original content is almost always 24 frames per second.

IMHO, avoiding 3:2 pulldown (used to convert film to video) is far more important to final image quality than the pixel matrix used to convert to digital (at least at the screen sizes and viewing distances used in the vast majority of homes). That's why 1080p (which in most cases is 24 frames per second) is a better way to watch movies than 1080i (which uses 3:2 pulldown to convert 24fps film into 30fps video).

The rest of the HD resolution controversy is interesting to videophiles, but makes very little difference to most people's enjoyment of their TV viewing experience.

It's one more way to confuse not so technically knowledgeable person.

It would bad idea to mix input signal parameters (digital stream compressed by MPEG-2/4 or VC-1 method) and output (pixels/refresh rate/light/color/etc of the FIXED PIXEL matrix - the screen what everyone watching too many hours per day :) ).

#24 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:42 PM

Well, as you said...no single answer to any of this.


I know most of the folks posting in this thread know this, but there's so many other factors affecting picture quality that it's almost impossible to make categorical statements about what's better for sports between 720p and 1080i. Film, no contest: 1080p. Hah!
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#25 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 08:04 AM

My Samsung LN46A650 is 1280 X 720 when it is fed a 720p signal.

An LCD TV cannot magically change its underlying pixel matrix based on the content it displays. It must apply scaling and motion smoothing to convert the content to its native resolution.

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#26 OFFLINE   lparsons21

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 08:10 AM

Not 100% sure, but I believe that model is a 1920x1080 panel. Its not 100% but typically I prefer to let the tv do the scaling, as I also have two 1080 displays in my house and have my dvrs set to native on and both 720 and 1080 selected, but as others have stated its really what each individual prefers. But if you are watching a channel that is broadcast in 720p, if you have both the above settings, some will be in 720 and other will be in 1080. ABC and FOX are 720, CBS, and NBC are 1080, all ESPN stations are all 720 I think, its probably about 75% 1080/25% 720 station mix if I had to take a guess.


I have my HR24s set the same way. With the AVR I have now, the 1080i/p is just passed through, but the 720p is massaged by the AVR's video circuitry. After testing thoroughly my AVR does a much better job of massaging than does the TV I have.

And SD looks amazing this way. Surely not HD by any stretch, but much, much better than any other way I've tried.

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#27 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 08:12 AM

I think this is the reason the ESPN channels use the 720p.

I believe ESPN uses 720p simply because they committed to it.

All the scholarly theories and technical citations in the world don't change the fact that most prefer CBS's 1080i. Our vision processing capabilities are fill in some pretty big holes.

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#28 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 08:37 AM

An LCD TV cannot magically change its underlying pixel matrix based on the content it displays. It must apply scaling and motion smoothing to convert the content to its native resolution.


The magic is exist, it's named native or pixel-to-pixel mode or 1:1 mode,etc
Important moment - size of your visual area will defined by input signal resolution if you employ the mode.

#29 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 09:44 AM

I believe ESPN uses 720p simply because they committed to it.

All the scholarly theories and technical citations in the world don't change the fact that most prefer CBS's 1080i. Our vision processing capabilities are fill in some pretty big holes.


Agree. Weren't they early out of the box in HD? And motion artifacting was a lot more common ten years ago than today....

I've seen totally crap 1080i and fabulous 720p— from time to time. CBS, NBC and local Comcast generally do better with 1080.
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