Jump to content


Welcome to DBSTalk


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to DBSTalk. Our community covers all aspects of video delivery solutions including: Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS), Cable Television, and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). We also have forums to discuss popular television programs, home theater equipment, and internet streaming service providers. Members of our community include experts who can help you solve technical problems, industry professionals, company representatives, and novices who are here to learn.

Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community. Sign-up is a free and simple process that requires minimal information. Be a part of our community by signing in or creating an account. The Digital Bit Stream starts here!
  • Reply to existing topics or start a discussion of your own
  • Subscribe to topics and forums and get email updates
  • Send private personal messages (PM) to other forum members
  • Customize your profile page and make new friends
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Photo

internet connection


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   Billzebub

Billzebub

    Godfather

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 543 posts
  • LocationPittsburgh, PA
Joined: Jan 01, 2007

Posted 24 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

The HR34 always has a 169.xxx for networking with the Genie clients.
Doesn't matter if this is with ethernet or coax networking.


So, is that sort of a secondary network for just the HR34 and Genie clients that doesn't effect my whole home system? (I don't have any Genie clients)

...Ads Help To Support This SIte...

#22 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

veryoldschool

    Lifetime Achiever

  • Moderators
  • 41,643 posts
Joined: Dec 09, 2006

Posted 24 November 2012 - 03:07 PM

So, is that sort of a secondary network for just the HR34 and Genie clients that doesn't effect my whole home system? (I don't have any Genie clients)

Yep, it's just a sub/separate set of IPs for the Genie/clients.
A.K.A VOS

#23 OFFLINE   Mooseman

Mooseman

    New Member

  • Registered
  • 3 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA
Joined: Apr 28, 2014

Posted 28 April 2014 - 02:26 PM

In my case the local network is still up and responding normal, it is the actual Internet that is being blocked, or consumed. (There is no delay in talking to local resources on my network.) That really is different than how a flood of DHCP request from the Directv Recievers would act, as they are on a subnet of the Wi-Fi router, and in theory should be isolated there. The broadband Cinema Server should isolate those request. What I'm seeing is something eating up my 19+ Mb/s of Internet speed, leaving me with just 0.63 Mb/s of Internet bandwidth. :nono:

 

I finally stumbled across this thread, and have been struggling with this exact same issue for months.  Please bear with me as I fill you in on the history of what's been done..

 

Symptom:  Our 15Mbps CenturyLink DSL will suddenly slow to about .50 Mbps and that will last for anywhere from 2 to 8 hours, until it suddenly resumes full speed on it's own without restarting the modem or any other intervention on our part.  First it was rather sporadic, maybe only happening every couple of weeks.  No real set time for it to start, usually in the evening but could really be any time.  We had a DirecTV HR24 DVR with a CCK attached.

 

We initially thought it was DSL related, had the modem swapped out but the problem persisted.  Long story short, I narrowed down the problem to the DVR - once I unplugged it from power, the problem went away and as soon as I plugged it back in, the slowdown began again (it must be a hardware problem with either the DVR or the CCK, right?).  Fast forward to contacting DTV and upgrading to a new Genie - and I thought I had the problem licked, but after a few days the problem has resurfaced.  When the network 'flood' begins, you can watch the router lights flashing like crazy that it's getting hammered with packets, and as soon as we unplug the Genie from power, the problem goes away.

 

I've reset the box and taken it off of our wireless network, to no avail.  I've tried blocking the DTV box MAC addresses in the router, and that works for a few days until the router gets hammered again.  I can then put the MAC addresses off and back on the 'Deny' list and it will work for another few days until it doesn't work any longer.  I've played with almost every setting on the router (including disabling uPnP) and nothing seems to work long term.  The last try was to reset the DVR back to original settings, take a really long ethernet cable to temporarily hook it to the router so that it uses the 'wired' settings and then disconnect it.  That worked for a couple of days until the wireless started bombing again (connecting permanently to ethernet really isn't an option for my layout).  I'm willing to live without onDemand and have no internet connection to the DVR, I just want it to leave my wireless network alone.  It really has come down to either having internet or TV, but not at the same time.

 

I'm at wit's end - and noticed that the previously post never really was resolved, and DTV has been no help.  Has anyone else here ever seen anything like this?

 

Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this issue.



#24 OFFLINE   slice1900

slice1900

    AllStar

  • Registered
  • 2,048 posts
  • LocationIowa
Joined: Feb 14, 2013

Posted 28 April 2014 - 02:31 PM

If you don't care about OnDemand, what do you need to have the Genie connected to the internet at all for? Keep your Genie and clients/receivers on an isolated network not connected to your router and unable to access the internet. They'll work fine, and you won't lose anything beyond OnDemand and some of the apps that pull information from the internet.


SL5, PI-6S, SA-6AL 3xSWM16, 21 H20-100, 1 H20-600, 7 H24-700/AM21


#25 OFFLINE   dennisj00

dennisj00

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 8,205 posts
  • LocationLake Norman, NC
Joined: Sep 27, 2007

Posted 28 April 2014 - 03:03 PM

If you don't care about OnDemand, what do you need to have the Genie connected to the internet at all for? Keep your Genie and clients/receivers on an isolated network not connected to your router and unable to access the internet. They'll work fine, and you won't lose anything beyond OnDemand and some of the apps that pull information from the internet.

While this may temporarily solve the problem, it shouldn't be the solution.   There should be no reason for the 34 to be causing a flood or slow-down of his network.

 

Since it's done it with both a 24 and 34 - AND the CCK, I'd run a temporary CAT5 to the 34 and disconnect the CCK.

 

Be sure the router has the latest firmware and set a static IP on the 34 to eliminate other possibilities.



Spending to stimulate the economy as fast as the credit cards will allow!

My Setup / Weather at Lake Norman!/ Boathouse BEES
DLB, MRV, nomad, HDGUI are HERE! . . . We're DONE!


#26 OFFLINE   Mooseman

Mooseman

    New Member

  • Registered
  • 3 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA
Joined: Apr 28, 2014

Posted 28 April 2014 - 03:27 PM

Thanks for the advice - the Genie is an HR44, and I had configured the wireless without hooking the CCK into the mix (apparently no CCK is needed with the new Genie).  That's why I was as surprised as anyone when the network slowdown started again, obviously it wasn't due to the old hardware.

 

I'm going to set a static IP on the DVR (to a separate subnet - thanks for the suggestion) and I'll report back on how that works.  As much as I'd like to be able to figure this out and get everything working in harmony again, I'll settle for sacrificing onDemand and internet apps for now just to be able to have internet and TV at the same time.



#27 OFFLINE   peds48

peds48

    🙈🙉🙊📡

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 9,526 posts
  • LocationLong Island, NY
Joined: Jan 10, 2008

Posted 28 April 2014 - 08:06 PM

.

 

We initially thought it was DSL related, had the modem swapped out but the problem persisted.  

you said you replaced the modem, how about the router? or is it a gateway?

 

Perhaps you can tell us more info about your network 


Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits. The rebels.
The the troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.

The ones who see things different.
They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.


Think Differently 

#28 OFFLINE   Rich

Rich

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 20,217 posts
  • LocationPiscataway, NJ
Joined: Feb 22, 2007

Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:14 AM

I finally stumbled across this thread, and have been struggling with this exact same issue for months.  Please bear with me as I fill you in on the history of what's been done..

 

Symptom:  Our 15Mbps CenturyLink DSL will suddenly slow to about .50 Mbps and that will last for anywhere from 2 to 8 hours, until it suddenly resumes full speed on it's own without restarting the modem or any other intervention on our part.  First it was rather sporadic, maybe only happening every couple of weeks.  No real set time for it to start, usually in the evening but could really be any time.  We had a DirecTV HR24 DVR with a CCK attached.

 

We initially thought it was DSL related, had the modem swapped out but the problem persisted.  Long story short, I narrowed down the problem to the DVR - once I unplugged it from power, the problem went away and as soon as I plugged it back in, the slowdown began again (it must be a hardware problem with either the DVR or the CCK, right?).  Fast forward to contacting DTV and upgrading to a new Genie - and I thought I had the problem licked, but after a few days the problem has resurfaced.  When the network 'flood' begins, you can watch the router lights flashing like crazy that it's getting hammered with packets, and as soon as we unplug the Genie from power, the problem goes away.

 

I've reset the box and taken it off of our wireless network, to no avail.  I've tried blocking the DTV box MAC addresses in the router, and that works for a few days until the router gets hammered again.  I can then put the MAC addresses off and back on the 'Deny' list and it will work for another few days until it doesn't work any longer.  I've played with almost every setting on the router (including disabling uPnP) and nothing seems to work long term.  The last try was to reset the DVR back to original settings, take a really long ethernet cable to temporarily hook it to the router so that it uses the 'wired' settings and then disconnect it.  That worked for a couple of days until the wireless started bombing again (connecting permanently to ethernet really isn't an option for my layout).  I'm willing to live without onDemand and have no internet connection to the DVR, I just want it to leave my wireless network alone.  It really has come down to either having internet or TV, but not at the same time.

 

I'm at wit's end - and noticed that the previously post never really was resolved, and DTV has been no help.  Has anyone else here ever seen anything like this?

 

Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this issue.

 

I had problems such as yours a couple of years ago.  I don't remember why, but I had an OOMA hooked up and one day, for whatever reason, I took it offline and my speeds were suddenly constant and high.  I usually get somewhere around 60 down, but with the OOMA hooked up I was getting 2 down at times.  Taking the OOMA and throwing it away stopped all my Internet problems. I damn near drove Cablevision nuts while all this was going on.  All I use CV for is the Net access and they couldn't find the problem. I was just lucky enough to stumble across it.

 

Rich



#29 OFFLINE   Mooseman

Mooseman

    New Member

  • Registered
  • 3 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA
Joined: Apr 28, 2014

Posted 04 May 2014 - 08:33 AM

I had problems such as yours a couple of years ago.  I don't remember why, but I had an OOMA hooked up and one day, for whatever reason, I took it offline and my speeds were suddenly constant and high.  I usually get somewhere around 60 down, but with the OOMA hooked up I was getting 2 down at times.  Taking the OOMA and throwing it away stopped all my Internet problems. I damn near drove Cablevision nuts while all this was going on.  All I use CV for is the Net access and they couldn't find the problem. I was just lucky enough to stumble across it.

 

Rich

Thanks everyone for your help, I can finally report a happy ending.  The culprit for our slow network was my wife's iPad - specifically the iCloud Backup.  She is a photo buff and has a lot of new photos that she's putting on there, and when the iPad is hooked to power and locked, the iCloud backup begins.  It pretty much takes over all of the available bandwidth, there's no way to limit what bandwidth it uses.

 

It's a long, crazy explanation as to why the Direct TV DVR was being blamed in the first place for the slowdown, we have a 1950's house whose living room electrical sockets are wired into the light switch on the wall.  So - to cut power to the whole TV/entertainment system, you simply have to hit the switch.  In testing for which culprit was causing the slowdown, when I hit that switch - the slow network problem went away.  As it turns out, on the other side of the room was my wife's iPad charger plugged into the same circuit.  Because iCloud only works when the iPad has power, turning off the light switch also turned off the iCloud backup and restored order.  I didn't even realize that the plug she was using was on the same circuit - doh!

 

Now that I've figured this out, I feel a little foolish for going down the Direct TV path - this was definitely a "palm to the forehead" moment :)

 

Thanks for all of your suggestions.



#30 OFFLINE   peds48

peds48

    🙈🙉🙊📡

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 9,526 posts
  • LocationLong Island, NY
Joined: Jan 10, 2008

Posted 04 May 2014 - 08:42 AM

Awesome.  Thanks for the update. Will keep this in mind


Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits. The rebels.
The the troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.

The ones who see things different.
They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.


Think Differently 

#31 OFFLINE   Rich

Rich

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 20,217 posts
  • LocationPiscataway, NJ
Joined: Feb 22, 2007

Posted 04 May 2014 - 10:44 AM

Thanks everyone for your help, I can finally report a happy ending.  The culprit for our slow network was my wife's iPad - specifically the iCloud Backup.  She is a photo buff and has a lot of new photos that she's putting on there, and when the iPad is hooked to power and locked, the iCloud backup begins.  It pretty much takes over all of the available bandwidth, there's no way to limit what bandwidth it uses.

 

It's a long, crazy explanation as to why the Direct TV DVR was being blamed in the first place for the slowdown, we have a 1950's house whose living room electrical sockets are wired into the light switch on the wall.  So - to cut power to the whole TV/entertainment system, you simply have to hit the switch.  In testing for which culprit was causing the slowdown, when I hit that switch - the slow network problem went away.  As it turns out, on the other side of the room was my wife's iPad charger plugged into the same circuit.  Because iCloud only works when the iPad has power, turning off the light switch also turned off the iCloud backup and restored order.  I didn't even realize that the plug she was using was on the same circuit - doh!

 

Now that I've figured this out, I feel a little foolish for going down the Direct TV path - this was definitely a "palm to the forehead" moment :)

 

Thanks for all of your suggestions.

 

It's so hard to troubleshoot without laying eyes and hands on equipment.  All we can do is suggest and speak of our own experiences.  Glad you got it fixed.  Must have been terribly confusing for you.  Who would have thought an iPad could have caused all your troubles?... I know I would have never let up on Cablevision and that was because of that OOMA.  Who knew?  Just got lucky.  

 

Rich 



#32 OFFLINE   richard1428

richard1428

    Cool Member

  • Registered
  • 89 posts
Joined: May 05, 2010

Posted 04 May 2014 - 12:12 PM

But it is a fact that a receiver can take bandwidth from a router. I experienced it myself some nights when i tried to watch netflix. I had to unplug the internet from the receiver. What different stuff do receivers get from the internet anyway, "Watch Now" feature?, local ads?
I thought firmware updates were downloaded from the satellite, as well the directv cinema from hidden channels (i think i had watch now ppv movies stored in my old hr23 with no internet connection)
It's been a while since i had that problem anyway, maybe they moved the downloads for very late hours.


Enviado desde mi iPhone con DBSTalk

#33 OFFLINE   peds48

peds48

    🙈🙉🙊📡

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 9,526 posts
  • LocationLong Island, NY
Joined: Jan 10, 2008

Posted 04 May 2014 - 12:35 PM

But it is a fact that a receiver can take bandwidth from a router. I experienced it myself some nights when i tried to watch netflix. I had to unplug the internet from the receiver. What different stuff do receivers get from the internet anyway, "Watch Now" feature?, local ads?
I thought firmware updates were downloaded from the satellite, as well the directv cinema from hidden channels (i think i had watch now ppv movies stored in my old hr23 with no internet connection)
It's been a while since i had that problem anyway, maybe they moved the downloads for very late hours.


Enviado desde mi iPhone con DBSTalk

SW updates and the PPV movies stored in your DVR are pushed via satellite NOT internet 


Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits. The rebels.
The the troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.

The ones who see things different.
They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.


Think Differently 

#34 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 18,351 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 04 May 2014 - 12:54 PM

It's a long, crazy explanation as to why the Direct TV DVR was being blamed in the first place for the slowdown, we have a 1950's house whose living room electrical sockets are wired into the light switch on the wall.

The outlet in my 1959 house are split: the top is switched and the bottom is unswitched. The theory is that you only needed on lamp per outlet location.

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#35 ONLINE   longrider

longrider

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 3,026 posts
  • LocationElizabeth, CO
Joined: Apr 21, 2007

Posted 04 May 2014 - 02:44 PM

My house was built in 1994 and has the switched outlets.  Like Harsh, they are split.  I don't know if it is code but i know it is standard practice when a front door opens directly into a living room and there is no overhead light there will be switched outlets. This is so you dont have to stumble in the dark to find  a light switch on a lamp


My Setup


#36 OFFLINE   peds48

peds48

    🙈🙉🙊📡

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 9,526 posts
  • LocationLong Island, NY
Joined: Jan 10, 2008

Posted 04 May 2014 - 02:49 PM

This is so you dont have to stumble in the dark to find  a light switch on a lamp

Not no more.  

 

http://www.belkin.co...in/p/P-F5Z0340/


Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits. The rebels.
The the troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.

The ones who see things different.
They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.


Think Differently 

#37 OFFLINE   Rich

Rich

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 20,217 posts
  • LocationPiscataway, NJ
Joined: Feb 22, 2007

Posted 05 May 2014 - 06:20 AM

My house was built in 1994 and has the switched outlets.  Like Harsh, they are split.  I don't know if it is code but i know it is standard practice when a front door opens directly into a living room and there is no overhead light there will be switched outlets. This is so you dont have to stumble in the dark to find  a light switch on a lamp

 

If there's a neutral wire in the switch box, it's quite simple to rectify that.  Without the neutral (probably only in older homes) it's a big job to fix them so that both receptacles are always hot.  I didn't luck out in that respect and Harsh probably is in the same situation.

 

Rich  



#38 OFFLINE   Dude111

Dude111

    Legend

  • Registered
  • 475 posts
Joined: Aug 06, 2010

Posted 05 May 2014 - 06:47 AM

Thanks everyone for your help, I can finally report a happy ending. The culprit for our slow network was my wife's iPad - specifically the iCloud Backup. She is a photo buff and has a lot of new photos that she's putting on there, and when the iPad is hooked to power and locked, the iCloud backup begins. It pretty much takes over all of the available bandwidth, there's no way to limit what bandwidth it uses.


Very good.... Im glad ya found out what the problem was buddy :)




spam firewall