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DIRECTV 4k Ultra HD Channel Anticipation


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#26 OFFLINE   Araxen

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 09:32 PM

They'll have to launch a separate Sat for 4k if they ever get serious about it. It'll need too much bandwidth to try and squeeze it onto the current Sats. I doubt they'll get serious about it anytime soon. It's still very expensive and doesn't have any market penetration at all. I think 48FPS may be where the focus will go in the meantime. We'll see if Blu-Ray changes the spec to support 48FPS after all The Hobbit movies hit the theater.
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#27 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 11:35 PM

Someone stated on this forum that the 110/119 Ku satellites would be used for 4k but I have no idea where that information came from or if it is really correct. Quite frankly, I doubt D* knows for sure.

#28 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:41 AM

They'll have to launch a separate Sat for 4k if they ever get serious about it. It'll need too much bandwidth to try and squeeze it onto the current Sats. I doubt they'll get serious about it anytime soon. It's still very expensive and doesn't have any market penetration at all. I think 48FPS may be where the focus will go in the meantime. We'll see if Blu-Ray changes the spec to support 48FPS after all The Hobbit movies hit the theater.

I suspect you're right on most of those counts.

Someone stated on this forum that the 110/119 Ku satellites would be used for 4k but I have no idea where that information came from or if it is really correct. Quite frankly, I doubt D* knows for sure.

I suspect DirecTV is ahead of the game in terms of internally discussing what they plan to do about 4K, realizing they have years to address it. With 2 new sats going up in the next couple of years, and payloads having some flexibility...there are options.
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#29 OFFLINE   Paul Secic

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:11 PM

So when is Direct TV going to have some 4k programming....When they launch their new bird up in the sky?


Look what happened to 3D. Nada!

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#30 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:30 PM

Look what happened to 3D. Nada!

Not exactly <in the Hertz commercial voice>.

There are 2 DirecTV channels currently designed to deliver 3D content, and the market demand (as well as the actual available content) seems to be met at this point. There is no doubt that 3D is still a "niche market" for folks who enjoy/like/prefer this kind of media viewing.

In contrast, 4K delivery will likely impact the entire mass spectrum of HD channels when the time comes. There is even 3D 4K HDTV - a mouthful. While similar to 3D in terms of requiring special HDTV sets and other related technology to present that kind of content. Blu Ray 3Ds seem to be the most popular and growing segment of distributing content at this time.

But 4K HDTV will require even more of a system-wide infrastructure change/update. That takes time and money, both of which are underway in terms of various tech advances and investment.

A year ago, 4K HDTV was seen at CES and the general consensus from manufacturers was that it's probably 2,3, 4 or more years away in terms of North American. CES 2013 is about 3 weeks away, and more 4K HDTV is expected to be promoted/seen there.

Because of the scope and scale of the infrastructure changes needed to deliver it for broadcasting content, it's fair to assume it'll be 2015 or later before more mainstream availability is out there.

Ironically, I just visited my neighborhood commercial Theater, and they just installed a 4K projector. The imagery on the large theater screens was nothing short of stunning - so the added resolution 4K brings will certainly be popular once it arrives.
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#31 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:57 PM

Someone stated on this forum that the 110/119 Ku satellites would be used for 4k but I have no idea where that information came from or if it is really correct. Quite frankly, I doubt D* knows for sure.


Well it came from statements made by Philip Goswitz, SVP of Space and Communications for DIRECTV.

But there's some confusion. Back in March he stated that as all channels were eventually carried in HD on the Ka band and all subscribers were converted to Ka band equipment, Ku transmissions will cease in about four years, and the Ka band with its greater bandwidth would be used to launch Ultra HD along with all other conventional HD channels.

http://www.pcmag.com...,2401711,00.asp

Now more recently here in an October 1st article by Swanni he quotes Goswitz again from AdvancedTelevision.com that as the Ku band is emptied, it (the Ku band) will be used for Ultra HD channels.

http://www.tvpredict...m/dhd100112.htm

:confused:

There's also an additional confusing statement in the October article that has Goswitz claiming to the Euroconsult conference the prior month that the conversion of all the remaining SD channels to HD by 2016 will be accomplished by means of "LiL Ka band capacity."

:confused::confused:

#32 OFFLINE   JoeTheDragon

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:35 PM

Well it came from statements made by Philip Goswitz, SVP of Space and Communications for DIRECTV.

But there's some confusion. Back in March he stated that as all channels were eventually carried in HD on the Ka band and all subscribers were converted to Ka band equipment, Ku transmissions will cease in about four years, and the Ka band with its greater bandwidth would be used to launch Ultra HD along with all other conventional HD channels.

http://www.pcmag.com...,2401711,00.asp

Now more recently here in an October 1st article by Swanni he quotes Goswitz again from AdvancedTelevision.com that as the Ku band is emptied, it (the Ku band) will be used for Ultra HD channels.

http://www.tvpredict...m/dhd100112.htm

:confused:

There's also an additional confusing statement in the October article that has Goswitz claiming to the Euroconsult conference the prior month that the conversion of all the remaining SD channels to HD by 2016 will be accomplished by means of "LiL Ka band capacity."

:confused::confused:

full HD or MPEG 4 SD???
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#33 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 05:03 PM

Well it came from statements made by Philip Goswitz, SVP of Space and Communications for DIRECTV.

But there's some confusion. Back in March he stated that as all channels were eventually carried in HD on the Ka band and all subscribers were converted to Ka band equipment, Ku transmissions will cease in about four years, and the Ka band with its greater bandwidth would be used to launch Ultra HD along with all other conventional HD channels.

http://www.pcmag.com...,2401711,00.asp

Now more recently here in an October 1st article by Swanni he quotes Goswitz again from AdvancedTelevision.com that as the Ku band is emptied, it (the Ku band) will be used for Ultra HD channels.

http://www.tvpredict...m/dhd100112.htm

:confused:

There's also an additional confusing statement in the October article that has Goswitz claiming to the Euroconsult conference the prior month that the conversion of all the remaining SD channels to HD by 2016 will be accomplished by means of "LiL Ka band capacity."

:confused::confused:


NHK wants to move up 8K to 2016

http://advanced-tele...016-for-u-hdtv/

#34 OFFLINE   Al K

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:37 AM

I attended a broadcasters convention in 1992 where all sorts of HD televisions, cameras, and equipment were on display. I bought my first HDTV in 1999.

Yet today, most people have never seen an HDTV picture with full 1920 X 1080i resolution with a 19Mbs data rate. The stations add sub-channels, the satellite providers lower the bit rate or resolution, or both. PBS sends a 1920 X 1080i satellite feed which the stations convert to 720, then add two or more subchannels, resulting in a picture that looks nothing like the feed.

In Phoenix I can receive about 35 or 40 OTA channels and I can get only one in true HD, the NBC affiliate in Tucson.

How can people think of 4K when the existing system is not being used to it's maximum, and no one complains?

#35 OFFLINE   dpeters11

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:54 AM

I also can't help but think, if the vast majority of people have 60" or under sizes in their living room, would they really see the increased detail of 4k?

#36 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:58 AM

I also can't help but think, if the vast majority of people have 60" or under sizes in their living room, would they really see the increased detail of 4k?

Actually that's a very good question.

We saw 42", 55", 60", and 84" 4K HDTVs last year. While most of those used 1080p content...you could indeed see a difference over today's 1080p HDTVs - albeit a nominal difference.

Where 4k content was shown on 4K HDTVs...yes...the difference was profound, regardless of screen size.

In 3 weeks we'll be at CES again...and see what the last year of progress in 4K has brought, both in terms of the technology as well as content/results.
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#37 OFFLINE   Stuart Sweet

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:59 AM

Al K, I agree with you in general but not in specific. If you are arguing that no one has seen a 1080i picture broadcast over an MPEG-2 channel using the full bandwidth... several stations do this in some markets. More to the point though, walk into any Best Buy and you'll see 38Mbps MPEG-4 Blu-ray being demonstrated, and that's presuming you don't have the technology in your home; it's under $100 now.

Where I do agree with you is that most people seem utterly content to watch the 6Mbps so-called HD streams from Netflix. Others sit happily in front of 1366x768 panels and think they are getting the HD experience. Then there are the millions of cable subscribers whose HD channels aren't numbered the same as their SD counterparts; they watch channel 2 out of habit, not realizing they could be watching 502 in HD instead. None of these folks is going to shell out $20,000 for a 4K TV in the near future.

By 2016, there should be a fair number of people who want 4K, plus I expect TV prices to be about $3,000, and maybe, just maybe, we'll have more than one decent option for distribution. I doubt home internet will be one of them.

HDTVfan0001, I have to disagree with you on one thing. The demos I've seen of 4k... once you get back to normal viewing distance if the TV isn't 60" or larger I couldn't tell the difference. And I'm picky. I have old eyes, but I'm picky.
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#38 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:04 PM

HDTVfan0001, I have to disagree with you on one thing. The demos I've seen of 4k... once you get back to normal viewing distance if the TV isn't 60" or larger I couldn't tell the difference. And I'm picky. I have old eyes, but I'm picky.

My eyes must be better... :lol:

Agree the difference is nominal though on those smaller sets < 55". Part of the problem last year was that very few locations showed 4K content on 4K HDTVs. I suspect this year...we'll do better.

A good time to bring the bifocals. :D
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#39 OFFLINE   unixguru

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:03 AM

Correct to say that few broadcast sources come close to max HD quality possible today. Too many channels of near-worthless content stuffed with ads.

3D and 4K are mostly dazzle for the masses. Marketeers love dazzle. It's a good way to hide shortcomings. Let's say we did get max HD resolution and bit rate on a regular basis. Is everything all good and time to move on to the next big thing? Not a chance. The picture technology has come a long way but is still FAR from perfect. Even at the top-of-the-market there are still weaknesses.

About a year ago I spent a lot of time researching 60"+ for best picture quality. At the time, and nothing really has changed even now, the best was either Elite 60"/70" or Sony 65" (XBR-65HX929). I ended up with the Sony.

Both the Elite and Sony are amazing but have their issues. The Elite has the damn 4th Yellow pixel that screws up color calibration. The Sony's, and to a lesser extent the Elites, suffer from "banding". All LED-lit, even high-end ones like this with their local dimming and more zones, have backlighting artifacts like clouding.

I'm more interested in OLED and Sony's Crystal LED than 4K.

3D and 4K are actually much easier for the TV manufacturers. 3D requires nothing new in the display itself. 4K is simple scaling and mostly just a manufacturing challenge. That's one reason why their marketeers like them. Plus Sony gets to benefit from the rest of the chain from cameras on up.

#40 OFFLINE   YakeVlad

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:50 AM

IMHO 4K tv won't ever see the light of day as a broadcast medium. I'm sure there will be some products like Blu-ray players and streaming content, but I seriously doubt it will be used for tv broadcasts because 8K UHDTV is already in the works and companies like NHK may be accelerating its schedule to 2016 instead of 2020 for the tech.

Even if it remained at 2020 as originally planned, that would be so close to 4K's readiness that 4K will be obsolete before it even has a chance to gain any retail traction. Others here and in other threads have already brought up the specter of consumer fatigue when it comes to major tv purchases. The manufacturers are well aware of this too and so 4K will be treated as a temporary, niche product until they start rolling out the 8K units.

Case and point, does anyone remember the EDTV's sold by retailers the first 3-4 years that HDTV's hit the retail shelves? They were a step up in resolution and PQ from SDTV's, but inferior to the HDTV's. Ultimately retailers sold some to a few unwitting consumers, but HDTV won the day. This I predict is the fate of 4K tv's. A step up from HDTV, but inferior to the 8K tv's which will hit the store shelves near enough in time as the 4K's to relegate them to the bargain bins.

Or another possibility could be what happened amongst HDTV's. The first ones on the market were 720P or 1080i units. A couple of years later the 1080P units hit the store shelves and now with the exception of a few cheapo models everything is 1080p. I could foresee a similar type of product timeline with 4K and 8K tv's. But in the end, it's the same story, 4K won't be the focus of the industry.

Anyway you spin it, I just don't see how the media industry would invest the amount of resource it would require to broadcast 4K content when 8K is so close behind it.

#41 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:11 AM

IMHO 4K tv won't ever see the light of day as a broadcast medium...
...Anyway you spin it, I just don't see how the media industry would invest the amount of resource it would require to broadcast 4K content when 8K is so close behind it.

Actually...more than 15 major manufacturers already have plans to sell 4K HDTV units sometime by 2014 or 2015. There were plenty of them on display this past January at CES, and more are expected in 3 weeks at CES 2013. Those are major investments pointing to 4K HDTV becoming a reality.

That said...4K as a broadcast medium is much earlier in the development cycle. It will also require a large investment, so it's simply too early to forecast if/when/how that will go.
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#42 OFFLINE   YakeVlad

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:50 AM

Actually...more than 15 major manufacturers already have plans to sell 4K HDTV units sometime by 2014 or 2015. There were plenty of them on display this past January at CES, and more are expected in 3 weeks at CES 2013. Those are major investments pointing to 4K HDTV becoming a reality.

That said...4K as a broadcast medium is much earlier in the development cycle. It will also require a large investment, so it's simply too early to forecast if/when/how that will go.


It doesn't surprise me to hear the manufacturers making such a push into 4K tv units. They've been hurting on sales the past couple of years and their hopes of 3D tv's producing a surge in sales never materialized. But outside of some early adopters, I'm not sure how many they'll be able to move. There is a very limited amount if any content out and the economy is still in the tank.

Don't get me wrong, I love new tech and gadgets and often fall under the early adopter category myself. But I also pay attention to R&D and tech timelines. The 4K and 8K development timelines appear close enough that IMO there's a significant chance for 4K to be skipped by the broadcasters and media companies. I'll be taking a wait and see approach to where the media companies are headed with their Next-Gen U-HDTV plans before I'm willing to make such a purchase decision this time around.

I'm looking forward to reading what you and some of the others see and hear on the floors at CES.

#43 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 11:00 AM

It doesn't surprise me to hear the manufacturers making such a push into 4K tv units. They've been hurting on sales the past couple of years and their hopes of 3D tv's producing a surge in sales never materialized. But outside of some early adopters, I'm not sure how many they'll be able to move. There is a very limited amount if any content out and the economy is still in the tank.

Don't get me wrong, I love new tech and gadgets and often fall under the early adopter category myself. But I also pay attention to R&D and tech timelines. I'll be taking a wait and see approach to where the media companies are headed with their Next-Gen U-HDTV plans before I'm willing to make such a purchase decision this time.

Actually...a number of manufacturers have done quite well the past few years...while a few others have not. The indistry as a whole has been parallel to the general U.S. economic patterns.

The 4k movement has as much to do with keeping the North America HD viewing experience in line with the rest of the world as it does any form of sales "push". In Asia...they're several years ahead on ultra HD, and many of the very same manufacturers that have successfully delivered 4K (or equivalent) in other parts of the world also make U.S. HDTV's...so they already have plenty of experience on the next-gen standard.

Having seen 4K content on 4K HDTVs...it is impressive. It's hard to believe a 1080p image would look inferior...but side-to-side...4K is clearly (no pun intended) superior. My local 18-screen Commercial Theater adopted 4K wiht new projectors in recent months, and the imagery there is leaps and bounds beyond anything previously on the big screen. Hollywood is already upgrading their technology for future content.

You are absolutely correct that price, 4K content availability, and industry commitment to more channels of content (such as broadcast and Blu Ray) will drive any success. Right now its all new and expensive. The same held true for HDTV a few years back. We'll see how momentum goes with 4K.
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#44 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:52 PM

Actually, as we have seen with 3D and other CE devices, just because people build it, does not mean the customers will come.

Even BluRay has not been the success most expected (except Steve Jobs). More are excited about lower rez Netflixs and iTunes than BluRay.

#45 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:47 PM

Actually, as we have seen with 3D and other CE devices, just because people build it, does not mean the customers will come.

Even BluRay has not been the success most expected (except Steve Jobs). More are excited about lower rez Netflixs and iTunes than BluRay.

Not everything flies with consumers...but then again...the U.S. is already behind the rest of the world adopting 4K HDTV...and manufacturers seem focused on closing the gap. With almost every major HDTV maker engaged in 4K technology...it's beyond a whim of an idea.
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#46 OFFLINE   Richierich

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 12:58 AM

Yes, it seems that 3D HDTV is not gathering the Masses as it seems to be a Nice to Have rather than I Really Need It Basis and with the Economy being what it is.......:D
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#47 OFFLINE   lipcrkr

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 03:18 AM

I saw the Sony 84" 4K HDTV in Vegas about a month ago. They had 4K programming, like a travel special on Greece, and yes, it was amazing. However, my 55" Samsung looked just as good (IMO) and about 90 thousand dollars cheaper. In other words, i'm content with what i have and my only hope is DirecTV gets HDTV for EVERY station that exists. Let's do that first.

#48 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:50 AM

I saw the Sony 84" 4K HDTV in Vegas about a month ago. They had 4K programming, like a travel special on Greece, and yes, it was amazing. However, my 55" Samsung looked just as good (IMO) and about 90 thousand dollars cheaper. In other words, i'm content with what i have and my only hope is DirecTV gets HDTV for EVERY station that exists. Let's do that first.

Wrong...the 4K HDTVs cost no where near that kind of money... ;)

The 84" Sony you reference even shows up on their website at retail pricing <$25K...

http://store.sony.co...CFQ0GnQodwm8AHQ

Even at retail, they are < 1/3 the cost you describe. By this time next year...they'll be much less. And that's for a 4K HDTV with a huge 84" screen in comparison.

As for the difference in imagery...if you indeed saw 4K original content on an 4K HDTV as you state...and claim your 1080p 55" Samsung "looked just as good"...then one has to wonder about that observation as well.
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#49 OFFLINE   lokar

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:48 AM

Actually, as we have seen with 3D and other CE devices, just because people build it, does not mean the customers will come.

Even BluRay has not been the success most expected (except Steve Jobs). More are excited about lower rez Netflixs and iTunes than BluRay.


I agree with all of this, it is still less than 50% that I go into a bar or restaurant and they even have current level HDTV hooked up properly. Most people seem more concerned with portability and not having to get off the couch to put a disc in a player rather then quality. I see 4k becoming a niche item like laserdiscs and I can't see broadcasters adopting it at all, considering all the bitching and moaning and alleged money they lost transitioning to HDTV. Nobody in my market even does HD news yet.

#50 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:57 AM

Nobody in my market even does HD news yet.

No doubt cost has something to do with it.

Then again...I have 5 local HD news broadcasts here...so location and population are considerations as well.
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