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Guest Message by DevFuse

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DECA ethernet bridge


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7 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Absentminded

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:29 PM

ok, long story short...I installed dishes 10 years ago...so I have tons of coax etc hanging around the house. I have very recently disconnected my directtv service. The dish is still there, but disconnected. I have no receiver anymore. Is it possible to use the DECA adapter (the old white one) to take an ethernet input from my router and convert it to coax? I want to run the coax around the house. I would buy a 2nd deca adapter to convert it back to ethernet to supply a computer in a bedroom with ethernet connection. Can these DECA adapters work like this without the receiver? I've looked through the manuals and searched the web with no solid answer on this. (or my google-fu is weak) I don't want to buy another adapter to be the guinea pig if someone has already tried it.

Thanks.

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#2 OFFLINE   samrs

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:38 PM

You would need power supplys for both decas. Yes.
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#3 OFFLINE   peds48

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:01 AM

Yes it can be done. but for the price you would pay for another DECA & power supplies, you can buy ethernet cable and use that. www.monoprice.com is a site for cheap but reliable cables. what you want to do only makes sense if you already have the cable run and the devices (DECAs) already there.

#4 OFFLINE   pappasbike

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 09:20 AM

You can use Ethernet over Powerline adapters to do what you want. You plug one in near your router/modem connect a cable to it and then plug a second one in wherever your device/computer is. That way you have an ethernet connection direct to your computer over your house wiring. I've used these things for a while and they work very well.

#5 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:35 PM

As was discussed in this thread and once advertised by Solid Signal in an ad posted there, you may indeed use DECA this way.

http://www.dbstalk.c...732#post3141732

Just remember that unlike conventional MoCA which operates in the 1.1+ GHz range, the DECA frequency band operates between 400-600 MHz, so do not attempt to diplex in any cable channels, cable modem, or OTA signals through the same cables distributing the DECA signals.

#6 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:45 PM

You can use Ethernet over Powerline adapters to do what you want. You plug one in near your router/modem connect a cable to it and then plug a second one in wherever your device/computer is. That way you have an ethernet connection direct to your computer over your house wiring. I've used these things for a while and they work very well.


True, just be advised that with power line adapters (Home Plug), if the two A/C receptacles happen to be on the opposite sides of the power lines you may have connectivity issues since the only way for ethernet traffic to get to the other adapter is by going all the way out to a power transformer on a utility pole and swing around its center tapped secondary to the other line side then travel back down to the residence to the other adapter.

Needles to say such a long round trip way to travel with lots of opportunity for signal derogation and interference to accumulate.

#7 OFFLINE   pappasbike

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 01:10 PM

I haven't had that issue. I've used a couple of these to get an Internet connection to our computers and DTV dvrs without a problem. Other locations might have a problem but we haven't.

#8 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 02:21 PM

I haven't had that issue. I've used a couple of these to get an Internet connection to our computers and DTV dvrs without a problem. Other locations might have a problem but we haven't.


Using a couple of Home Plug adapters here myself for connection to a network printer. Formerly had a desktop PC on Home Plug as well. Worked fine until the PC needed to be relocated to another room, then had all kinds of connection problems with it. Assumed it was due to the "opposite side of the A/C mains" problem.

Had to put that PC on WiFi through a wireless-N PCI card with MIMO antenna array.

Linksys WMP300n.




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