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Subnet playlist seperation question


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31 replies to this topic

#26 OFFLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

Carl, here's a short answer. . . while I haven't tested this with all brands of home routers, you should be able to set your router to 192.168.0.1 with a mask of 255.255.255.0 but of course you can't use the .1 in your first group of clients.

I remember having a 'management' pc with a mask of 255.255.255.0 being able to see all the clients, but I don't think the masked clients (something less than .0 as the last octet) being able to see those pcs.

I think that goes under the 'other problems' I mentioned earlier.

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#27 OFFLINE   The Merg

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:43 PM

Carl, here's a short answer. . . while I haven't tested this with all brands of home routers, you should be able to set your router to 192.168.0.1 with a mask of 255.255.255.0 but of course you can't use the .1 in your first group of clients.

I remember having a 'management' pc with a mask of 255.255.255.0 being able to see all the clients, but I don't think the masked clients (something less than .0 as the last octet) being able to see those pcs.

I think that goes under the 'other problems' I mentioned earlier.


Correct. The router being set with the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 allows it to see all clients connected to it. It shouldn't matter what the IP address of the router is.

Here's a pretty good doc that shows how computers/router communicate depending on their IP address and subnet mask. Start at page 4 where it shows the examples.

http://www.mission-s...in Practice.pdf

- Merg

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#28 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:17 AM

Correct. The router being set with the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 allows it to see all clients connected to it. It shouldn't matter what the IP address of the router is.

Here's a pretty good doc that shows how computers/router communicate depending on their IP address and subnet mask. Start at page 4 where it shows the examples.

http://www.mission-s...in Practice.pdf

- Merg


Hey, nice easy to read and understand document.

But to be clear from the doc., the (typically 4 or 5) LAN ports on a router are more than just an integrated ethernet switch, but can actually route packets between different LAN sub-networks (if the router's LAN interface is configured to cover both subnets of course)?

#29 OFFLINE   The Merg

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:47 AM

Hey, nice easy to read and understand document.

But to be clear from the doc., the (typically 4 or 5) LAN ports on a router are more than just an integrated ethernet switch, but can actually route packets between different LAN sub-networks (if the router's LAN interface is configured to cover both subnets of course)?


Mmmmm... Not exactly. The router is still routing packets within the same network, just a different subnet. As far as the router sees it, all the devices are on the same network.

- Merg

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#30 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 11:10 AM

Mmmmm... Not exactly. The router is still routing packets within the same network, just a different subnet. As far as the router sees it, all the devices are on the same network.

- Merg


OK, but from the doc., the router changes the packet header information from its own LAN address set by the source on one subnet (under the "Next Hop" category in the doc.) to the actual destination address of the packet on another subnet when the router places the packet on the particular LAN port the destination host on the other subnet is connected to?

Just want to be clear that the LAN ports of a router are more than just an ethernet switch that can "switch" packets between physical ports, but only for hosts on the same network. Not between networks which falls into the area of "routing."

#31 OFFLINE   BAHitman

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 11:17 AM

It is not a wise idea to break up a subnet on some devices and not others with overlapping IP addressess...

This can cause erroneous broadcasts to be seen by some devices on addressess other than the correct address, and I have seen this crash some consumer level devices, including routers...

it will NOT net you internet access on those devices that cannot "see" the router.

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#32 OFFLINE   BAHitman

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

OK, but from the doc., the router changes the packet header information from its own LAN address set by the source on one subnet (under the "Next Hop" category in the doc.) to the actual destination address of the packet on another subnet when the router places the packet on the particular LAN port the destination host on the other subnet is connected to?

Just want to be clear that the LAN ports of a router are more than just an ethernet switch that can "switch" packets between physical ports, but only for hosts on the same network. Not between networks which falls into the area of "routing."


If host1 talks to host2 through the switch of the router, the router has no involvement whatsoever in the communication, except that the switch fabric simply sends the data to the destination port... only in cases where host1 has to talk to google which is on the other side of the router, that's where the translation and hop count comes into play

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