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Repossessing a late model car


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#1 OFFLINE   AntAltMike

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:06 PM

An acquaintance of mine told me about a week ago that he was behind on his monthly car payments and that the lender was threatening to repossess it.  He said he was not overly concerned because it is registered at his previous address, about a thousand miles away, and that he hasn't updated his driver's license, which was also issued there.

 

I haven't seen his car parked in his driveway for three days now, and when I drove out early this afternoon, I saw him walking in the direction of his residence, which was about a mile or more away, with no more convenient public transportation drop off point.  Guess what I just figured out?

 

His car is a late model Ford 500, maybe two or three years old, at the most.  Might that model car have GPS or Lojack as standard equipment?  One other way that a repo man might have a line on where he lives is that his car was involved in a collision (not his fault) that took a few return trips to the body shop (front end damage: always a potential challenge to restore to like-new precision) and since car lenders mandate collision insurance over the life of the loan, it could be that the insurance claim details, including his local address, were forwarded to the lender.  The insurance company also paid for his replacement car rentals, so Enterprise might even have entered his local address in their invoice.


Edited by AntAltMike, 31 May 2013 - 03:22 PM.


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#2 OFFLINE   BattleScott

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:14 PM

An aquaintance of mine told me about a week ago that he was behind on his monthly car payments and that the lender was threatening to repossess it.  He said he was not overly concerned because it is registered at his previous address, about a thousand miles away, and that he hasn't updated his driver's license, which was also issued there.

 

I haven't seen his car parked in his driveway for three days now, and when I drove out early this afternoon, I saw him walking in the direction of his residence, which was about a mile or more away, with no more convenient public transportation drop off point.  Guess what I just figured out?

 

His car is a late model Ford 500, maybe two or three years old, at the most.  Might that model car have GPS or Lojack as standard equipment?  One other way that a repo man might have a line on where he lives is that his car was involved in a colission (not his fault) that took a few return trips to the body shop (front end damage: always a potential challenge to restore to like-new precision) and since car lenders mandate collission insurance over the life of the loan, it could be that the insurance claim details, including his local address, were forwarded to the lender.  The insurance company also paid for his replacement car rentals, so Enterprise might even have entered his local address in their invoice

 

I would suspect that the lender was able to track down his new address easy enough. Unless he completely went off the grid and didn't establish any type of presence in the new location (bank account, utilities, credit cards etc.), it would be pretty easy for them to track down his new address.

 

Lojack is also another very good possibility.


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#3 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:15 PM

Busted !



#4 OFFLINE   fluffybear

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:30 PM

I would suspect that the lender was able to track down his new address easy enough. Unless he completely went off the grid and didn't establish any type of presence in the new location (bank account, utilities, credit cards etc.), it would be pretty easy for them to track down his new address.

 

Lojack is also another very good possibility.

 

l worked debt collection back in college and was amazed at how easy it was to locate someone.  Something has simple as filing a 'change of address' or your income taxes.  Also surprising was how quick former neighbors, landlords, co-workers, etc.  would sell you out. 


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#5 ONLINE   klang

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:36 PM

Wouldn't a credit check show your current address as well?



#6 OFFLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:49 PM

There are tracking systems, but LoJack isn't one that will help debt collectors.  Receivers are only available to law enforcement and the transmitter only works after the VIN is entered by police as stolen.

 

That is, unless they've begun to offer a skip tracers version.


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#7 OFFLINE   Mark Holtz

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 05:50 PM

A repossession will remain on your credit history for seven years from the delinquency date of the first missed payment leading up to the status of repossession. (Source: http://www.experian....entire-time.html). Also see this article from the FTC


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#8 OFFLINE   dpeters11

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 07:59 PM

If it were as easy as not updating the registration address or license, a lot more people would probably try that. They have GPS systems that are sold specifically to car dealers.They also can do starter interrupt. A few years ago, an employee had been laid off from a dealer and disabled over 100 cars.

 

http://www.rmtrackin...-dealer-gps.php

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#9 OFFLINE   Mark Holtz

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 01:54 AM

Your buddy just joined the ranks of high-risk borrowers which means that unless he pays cash on the spot, he'll pay higher interest rates, plus the lender may insist on a tracking device or a disablement device during the term of the loan. See GPS devices help dealerships keep an eye on vehiclesand Car Payment Or Else: Engine Shut Off Systems.


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#10 OFFLINE   SamC

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 04:41 AM

Your friend is very lucky they only repoed the car.  His actions constitute Grand Theft-Auto.  He could just as easily been an episode of COPS as one of Operacion Repo.



#11 OFFLINE   James Long

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 06:38 AM

He said he was not overly concerned because it is registered at his previous address, about a thousand miles away, and that he hasn't updated his driver's license, which was also issued there.

 

Where I live that could be a violation of state law.  One must change their address within 30 days of moving.


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#12 OFFLINE   The Merg

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 06:35 PM

Your friend is very lucky they only repoed the car. His actions constitute Grand Theft-Auto. He could just as easily been an episode of COPS as one of Operacion Repo.

It's a civil issue. It is not Auto Theft. As mentioned in the next post, the only crime is that his license and registration were not updated.

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#13 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 06:43 AM

Where I live that could be a violation of state law.  One must change their address within 30 days of moving.

 

We have that too in NJ.  You'd be amazed at how many cars are registered in PA and never seem to get caught.   

 

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#14 OFFLINE   tsmacro

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:33 AM

Where I live that could be a violation of state law.  One must change their address within 30 days of moving.

I remember that when I first moved to Indiana. Originally the idea was I was going to not change my license and registration until they were about to expire in NY. I mean I figured that hey I had paid for it and had something like a year on them why would I change it? well anyway on day 29 or something like that I did update it and got my Indiana plates and license. I was also a little surprised that they insisted on confiscating my old NY license. In NY they always let you keep your old licenses and I had kept them around as kind of retrospective of my driving life, plus they were always good for a laugh to pull them out and show people all my bad driver photos over the years. So the fact that I wasn't going to have my last NY license for my collection made my first trip to the Indiana BMV (Not DMV as in NY) even that much more special. I've often wondered about the car in my company parking lot that's had an Alaskan license plate for years, I'm pretty sure they don't commute!




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#15 OFFLINE   scooper

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:44 PM

An Active Duty member of our armed forces can register their vehicles in either their Home of record state or their current state. Same goes for driver's license. However, this doesnot apply to the other family members. You can also designate whatever state as your home of record (this can have income tax implications as well as where your household goods the government will move them to when you leave active duty ).

 

At least that was the law while I was on Active duty. (1984-1995) It may have changed since then.


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#16 OFFLINE   AntAltMike

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:01 AM

It appears that's how they got him.  or how he got himself.  I gave him a ride a couple of days ago and I asked him what the terms were for getting his car back, and he said he didn't bother to look into it because he owed about $6,000 but the car was only "worth" about $2,000.  It turns out that the car was a little older than I had guessed, and its trade in value is about $4,500 and its average dealer resale price about $6,500 to $6,800, but realistically, it isn't worth that much to him, even if he could come up with the money, which he can't, which is why he is still walking.

 

I asked him how they found the car.  He said they didn't.  He said the car developed an ignition problem so he had it towed to the dealer but the dealer then said they wouldn't work on the car or release it until he got caught up on the payments.  He said that he had had that electrical problem before and that anyone could fix it but it was just his bad luck that he brought it to a dealer.  I believe his conclusions are in error, but since he was resigned to not getting the car back, I didn't attempt to elucidate him regarding the likelihood that this ignition failure was induced by the lender/lienholder.


Edited by AntAltMike, 25 August 2013 - 07:14 AM.


#17 OFFLINE   SamC

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:18 PM

It's a civil issue. It is not Auto Theft.

 

 

Incorrect, at least in my jurisdiction.

 

2) c) (1) If a person removes any of his or her property out of any county with the intent to prevent the same from being levied upon by any execution;...(or)

3) If a person receives the property of another with the intent to defraud any creditor or to prevent the property from being made liable for the payment of debts

The person is guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than two thousand five hundred dollars and be confined in jail not more than one year.

 

http://www.legis.sta...hap=61&art=3#03



#18 OFFLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:34 PM

I don't see where either of those clauses would apply.


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#19 OFFLINE   SamC

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:34 PM

An Active Duty member of our armed forces can register their vehicles in either their Home of record state or their current state. Same goes for driver's license. However, this doesnot apply to the other family members. You can also designate whatever state as your home of record (this can have income tax implications as well as where your household goods the government will move them to when you leave active duty ).

 

 

The only two exceptions are active duty military and bona fide college students at a residential college.  Both should always carry their military or college IDs along with their DL and registrations.  Other than that the law in every state is that one automatically establishes residency by any of a variety of simple actions, such as signing a lease, working for wages, applying for welfare, getting utility services, almost any thing.  Depending on the state you have between 30 and 90 days to change your DL and registration (and normalize your insurance, if you do not have coverage from a national company).  Failure to do so renders you DL and registration void, and subjects you to summary arrest and you car to seizure.  Depending on the jurisdiction, your insurance can disclaim coverage, as most states do not allow coverage for illegal acts, and driving with no DL and no registration is illegal.

 

Buddy of mine's daughter is an MD.  Finished school and went to residency in Alabama.  Woke up one morning to find her car gone.  Called cops.  Cops had confiscated her car from the parking lot of her apartment, because she was an Alabama resident (medical residency is employment, not school) with a WV registered car.   She had to pay triple what she would have plus a $200 fine for the registration, then had to go to the insurance company and get an Alabama insurance proof card, and then get an Alabama DL to get her car out of impound. 



#20 OFFLINE   The Merg

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:37 PM

Incorrect, at least in my jurisdiction.


http://www.legis.sta...hap=61&art=3#03


What's the full code section? Your link provided is not correct.


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