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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Triplexer vs Separator quality


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11 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   cutterzoo

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:26 PM

I currently own a DISH 625 receiver connected to a DPP Twin LNB  through the CATV splitter, via a triplexer. 

 

I'm going to be moving the receiver to a different location within the house, and also running some new cables while I'm at it.

 

Is there a signal quality benefit to homerunning the dish directly to the receiver via a separator, bypassing the CATV splitter, and then homerunning the Home Distribution output from the receiver directly to the input of the CATV splitter?

 

And if so, is there a benefit to using an actual separator, as opposed to just utilizing the triplexer as a separator-only without connecting the Home Distribution output to it?

 

Thanks in advance.



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#2 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 02:13 AM

I currently own a DISH 625 receiver connected to a DPP Twin LNB  through the CATV splitter, via a triplexer. 

 

I'm going to be moving the receiver to a different location within the house, and also running some new cables while I'm at it.

 

Is there a signal quality benefit to homerunning the dish directly to the receiver via a separator, bypassing the CATV splitter, and then homerunning the Home Distribution output from the receiver directly to the input of the CATV splitter?

 

And if so, is there a benefit to using an actual separator, as opposed to just utilizing the triplexer as a separator-only without connecting the Home Distribution output to it?

 

Thanks in advance.

Hey, DIRECTV customer here;

 

But from what I know about that type of Dish setup you shouldn't see any real difference. To begin with what you refer to as a "CATV splitter" is actually a "satellite/OTA diplexer" as indicated in the attachment which has no splitting losses beyond maybe the component's slight natural insertion loss of course.

 

And I can see no reason why a dedicated DPP band separator would perform any better than the triplexer's internal one.

 

But I'm curious, if you're thinking of running the dish feed passed the satellite/OTA dipexer and straight to the triplexer or other DPP separator, why don't you just remove the sat./OTA diplexer altogether and have the receiver's home distribution output connect directly to the rest of the TV2 back feed network with a simple F-to-F barrel connector?    

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#3 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:58 AM

remove the "CATV splitter" and never use it for sat lines !

 

If you don't know difference between sat/catv switches/splitters/diplexors/etc - DON'T USE IT


Edited by P Smith, 04 July 2013 - 10:59 AM.


#4 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:28 AM

A verbal description of what you're trying to accomplish (without mentioning specific devices) would be helpful.  Phrases like "combining OTA" or "backfeeding" rather than diplexer, etc.

 

It is too easy to get notted up in device nomenclature when all you really want to do is hook it up the way it needs to be hooked up.


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#5 OFFLINE   scooper

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 11:12 AM

I would want to to know what you're trying to do as well as what devices are already inplce.

 

If you do not know the differences between the various gadgets - you are not qualified to be making changes without hurting your equipment.


You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

#6 OFFLINE   cutterzoo

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 10:30 AM

Thanks to some of you for your constructive advice. . .?

 

My sincere apologies for using the term "CATV splitter", as opposed to "Digital 4-way splitter".  I could have blown up the entire house had I used the wrong device.

 

The project is finished, and no one died.



#7 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 10:48 AM

:up:


Edited by P Smith, 20 July 2013 - 10:48 AM.


#8 OFFLINE   gov

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 11:16 AM

And while we are on triplexers, every one I have ever seen has 3 jumpers attached to it and those jumpers have those cheap crimp on F connectors, that if they were ANYWHERE else in the system, the installer tech would have to replace them with his newfangled PPC fittings on PAIN OF DEATH.

 

Yet magically right behind the receiver, they are perfectly fine to use.

 

 

!rolling



#9 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:32 PM

And while we are on triplexers, every one I have ever seen has 3 jumpers attached to it and those jumpers have those cheap crimp on F connectors, that if they were ANYWHERE else in the system, the installer tech would have to replace them with his newfangled PPC fittings on PAIN OF DEATH.

 

Yet magically right behind the receiver, they are perfectly fine to use.

 

 

!rolling

Yeah;

 

For a long time I wondered about the same inconsistency on the DIRECTV side with their B Band Converters.

 

The pigtail on them used those same cheap hexagonal crimp-on F connectors. Unacceptable for install anywhere else in the coax plant, yet somehow acceptable right at satellite input(s) of the receiver.

 

Go figure ... :scratch:   


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#10 OFFLINE   eisberg

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 12:10 PM

 

And while we are on triplexers, every one I have ever seen has 3 jumpers attached to it and those jumpers have those cheap crimp on F connectors, that if they were ANYWHERE else in the system, the installer tech would have to replace them with his newfangled PPC fittings on PAIN OF DEATH.
 
Yet magically right behind the receiver, they are perfectly fine to use.
 
 
!rolling

 

I am a dish installer, and yeah, I know what you mean. We have to use the the Dish approved F Connectors every where on the system, but are not expected to replace them on seperators/triplexers. I have never asked why that is, but the only thing I can think of is that we know the quality of those crimp on F Connectors installation, where as we do not know the quality of install for ones prior to the Receiver inside someones home.

#11 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 12:23 PM

it's simple: these cables manufactured under close control of quality and passed all mechanical and electrical tests, so no worry - it's approved by the company



#12 OFFLINE   gov

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:46 PM

I've never had a problem with the Dish separator/triplexer cables, however, B-band converters in  the DirecTV world in my experience are very easy to break.  The connector that goes on the receiver is fine, but whatever is just inside the housing apparently is pretty fragile.

 

I always am careful with them, but I carry several spares at all times.

 

For older MDU setups, D* and E* techs are sometimes at the mercy of whatever level of quality was deemed acceptable when the building was put up.






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