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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Massive fresh water source found in Kenya


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19 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   dpeters11

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:06 PM

There is enough water to serve the entire country for 70 years, 200 billion cubic meters, 62 by 40 square miles.

 

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#2 OFFLINE   yosoyellobo

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:17 PM

This is indeed good news. Water and the lack of is going to one of the major problems of the twenty-first century even in this country.

#3 OFFLINE   dpeters11

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:36 PM

Right, as long as the government uses it properly. I'm not sure about Kenya, but there are some countries where a resource like that can give a government a lot of power over the people.



#4 OFFLINE   houskamp

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:37 PM

definately nice to live in area with one of the largest freshwater supplies :)


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#5 ONLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 04:50 AM

Coming to a Walmart near you soon, Kenyan Liquid Gold, in convenient 24 bottle cases.


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#6 OFFLINE   djlong

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 04:54 AM

What I didn't read in any of the articles on the subject was the effects of starting to drain that aquifier.



#7 OFFLINE   yosoyellobo

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 06:48 AM

What I didn't read in any of the articles on the subject was the effects of starting to drain that aquifier.


"But just as importantly the aquifer is replenished from distant mountains. So it should never run dry, assuming it is managed properly."

#8 OFFLINE   dpeters11

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 07:44 AM

Makes you wonder what other kind of reserves are out there, even ones not that hard to get to.



#9 ONLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 08:47 AM

^  You'd think with all the IR satellites, ground penetrating radar and holes we've poked in the Earth there wouldn't be too many more surprises.


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#10 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 10:49 AM

definately nice to live in area with one of the largest freshwater supplies :)

 

Uh, where would that be? 


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#11 ONLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 11:47 AM

Uh, where would that be? 

Wild guess would be near the Great Lakes region.


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#12 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 01:45 PM

Excellent guess, but could be a number of other places. 


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#13 OFFLINE   phrelin

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 02:14 PM

Yeah, sure, "enough water to serve the entire country for 70 years." Yes, it offers some hope, but they shouldn't drink it all in 70 years.  I hate stories reflecting no big picture view of the subject, in this case "groundwater." We already know about groundwater pumping problems and I hope these folks in their desperation also don't have to learn the hard way. From this USGS page:
 

 

land-subsidence-poland-calif.jpg

 

This photo shows the approximate location of maximum subsidence in the United States, identified by research efforts of Dr. Joseph F. Poland (pictured). The site is in the San Joaquin Valley southwest of Mendota, California. Signs on pole show approximate altitude of land surface in 1925, 1955, and 1977.

 

In this case, excessive groundwater pumping allowed the upper soil layers to dry out and compress and compact, which is by far the single largest cause of subsidence. Soil compaction results in a reduction of the pore sizes between soil particles, resulting in essentially a permanent condition—rewetting of the underground soil and rock does not cause the land to go back up in altitude. This results in a lessening of the total storage capacity of the aquifer system. Here, the term "groundwater mining" is really true.

 

And since 1977 it has gotten worse. From another USGS page:
 

Subsidence is a global problem and, in the United States, more than 17,000 square miles in 45 States, an area roughly the size of New Hampshire and Vermont combined, have been directly affected by subsidence. More than 80 percent of the identified subsidence in the Nation has occurred because of exploitation of undergroundwater, and the increasing development of land and water resources threatens to exacerbate existing land-subsidence problems and initiate new ones. In many areas of the arid Southwest, and in more humid areas underlain by soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, or salt, land subsidence is an often-overlooked environmental consequence of our land- and water-use practices.

 

mapsubsidence.gif

 

Map of the U.S. showing some of the areas where subsidence has been attributed to the compaction of aquifer systems caused by groundwater pumpage. From "Land Subsidence in the United States", USGS Fact Sheet-165-00, December 2000.

 


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#14 OFFLINE   ronton3

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 02:53 PM

Multinationals will take over, bribe the politicians, sell it to the highest bidders, local Kenyans get nothing.  Such a sad world we live in.



#15 OFFLINE   AntAltMike

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 03:32 PM

They'll be smuggling it out by drinking it while working and then urinating...



#16 OFFLINE   AntAltMike

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 03:34 PM

If they don't find some underground water in Egypt before the Nile gets dammed, there'll be a war there.



#17 OFFLINE   Nick

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 08:44 PM

North Floridan Aquifer

 

Centered under coastal Georgia, the North Floridan Aquifer (NFA) extends south from just west of the Atlantic at about Hilton Head Island, SC to about St. Augustine, FL. It fills during rainy seasons, but during dry seasons the level of the aquifer drops and it tends to draw in salt water from the Atlantic by osmosis. My town of Brunswick, GA sits right on top of the aquifer and our private community well, serving about 21 homes, draws from it. The pumping, filtration and storage of our water is maintained by a professional water management firm.

 

Without doing the research, I have no idea the theoretical capacity or current size of the NFA pool. The USGS is the place to start for detailed and specific information about your local water supply


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#18 OFFLINE   AntAltMike

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 05:21 AM

Then one da

 

Makes you wonder what other kind of reserves are out there, even ones not that hard to get to.

The one day,

he was shootin' for some food...



#19 OFFLINE   phrelin

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:53 AM

Here's the best example of how not to manage an aquifer explained in an article headlined How long before the Great Plains runs out of water? It explains:

 

The sprawling Ogallala Aquifer in the Great Plains provides freshwater for roughly one-fifth of the wheat, corn, cattle and cotton in the United States. But key parts of the underwater aquifer are being depleted faster than they can be recharged by rain (see map).

 

300px-Ogallala_changes_1980-1995.svg_.pn

 

Regions where the water level has declined in the period

1980-1995 are shown in yellow and red; regions where it

has increased are shown in shades of blue. Data from the

USGS (Wikipedia)

 

That raises a question: How long before those areas in decline run out of groundwater for farming?

 

A recent study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences tried to come up with an answer for the crucial Kansas section of the aquifer. At current rates of use, farming in that area is likely to peak by 2040 or so due to water depletion.

 

As the article notes, pumping would have to drop by 80% for a sustainable water supply. It also notes that won't happen. The reason is not stated. I would guess it is hidden in this from the Kansas Department of Agriculture:
 

Agriculture is the largest industry in the state of Kansas. In 2010, Kansas produced more than $2.7 billion in agriculture exports. Kansas farmers provide food for Americans and people in 102 different countries around the world.

 

Nicknamed the Wheat State and the Sunflower State for its high production of these crops, Kansas is also the top grain sorghum-producing state in the nation and third in beef production. There are more than twice as many cattle in Kansas than people.

 

At 28.2 million acres, Kansas has the second-most cropland of any state and the most cropland of any state by percentage. These fertile soils are tended by hardworking, ingenuitive Kansans. In 1940, one Kansas farmer fed 19 people. Today, one Kansas farmer feeds 155 people. Through advancements of technology and research, Kansas farmers will continue to feed more people with fewer resources in the future.

 

Most certainly there are some "hardworking, ingenuitive Kansans" who can be seen at sunrise in their coveralls working their farms. But "$2.7 billion in agriculture exports" means corporate suits manipulating farm subsidies. Those folks use up resources and move on. Let's hope the Kenyan's learn from our failures.


Edited by phrelin, 18 September 2013 - 09:55 AM.

"In a hundred years there'll be a whole new set of people."
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#20 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 01:14 PM

ingenuitive??  resourceful, creative? An ingenious fabrication!

 

Good article. 


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