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Wired CCK specs (10/100/1000Tbase)?


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#1 OFFLINE   El Vato

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 03:56 PM

All,

 

I'm in need to some assistance.  I'm trying to find the wired CCK specs, specifically if what kind of wired ethernet connection a CCK can handle...is it 10, 100, or 1000 Tbase?

 

Reason is that I have a wireless router in the basement (Asus RT-AC66U) and another ( Linksys WRT120N) on the main floor, both in "access point mode" but want to find out what speeds a wired CCK and RG6 cable can handle. The linksys WRT120N on the main floor (purchased for $5 at a garage sale) is connected to a wired CCK, which connects to an RG6 wall connection, down to the basement where that connects to a SWM8 splitter, then through a SWM16 module to another wired CCK which then connects to my DSL modem.

 

I'd like to upgrade the WRT120N to another Asus RT-AC66U, but want to know if the D* CCK setup as I have it now can handle gigabit speeds/data flow.  Currently, the WRT120N seriously bogs down when the family and I are upstairs surfing.  Upgrading would be awesome not only for the new AC standard, but I noticed an impressive speed upgrade when using 5Ghz instead of 2.4Ghz in my neighborhood.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

El Vato


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#2 ONLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 04:10 PM

The wired CCK is probably a 100Mbs Ethernet and the entire DECA cloud is rated around 200 Mbs.

 

Remember, the CCK is only handling internet traffic from your DVRs so it's really not that critical (unless you have DVRs outside of the DECA cloud.



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#3 OFFLINE   peds48

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 04:48 PM

Yes, the wired CCK (DECA BB) and DirecTV receivers are all 100 BASE-T


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#4 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 06:09 PM

Remember, the CCK is only handling internet traffic from your DVRs so it's really not that critical (unless you have DVRs outside of the DECA cloud.

There may be at least two other products that aren't usually in the DECA cloud:

1. DIRECTV2PC
2. GenieGo

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#5 OFFLINE   TBoneit

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 08:06 PM

Snipped

Upgrading would be awesome not only for the new AC standard, but I noticed an impressive speed upgrade when using 5Ghz instead of 2.4Ghz in my neighborhood.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

El Vato

Shh.... If You tell them how much faster the 5Ghz and the new 802.11ac is than the 2.4 Ghz band everybody will jump on it and clutter it up. :)

 

3 times faster for me when I tested today FWIW.

 

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#6 ONLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 11:57 PM

Wait, are you saying you are using the deca cloud to move the Internet signal from your modem to the access point to furnish you house with wifi?


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#7 OFFLINE   El Vato

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 12:13 AM

That is correct.

 

The downstairs router is connected to the DSL modem directly via CAT5e cable, but the upstairs router is connected to a wired CCK, down through the RG6 into the basement where the RG6 connects to a SWM8 splitter, then into the SWM16 module, through a second CCK that provides the WH cloud with an internet connection, then to the DSL modem.

 

I've peaked at about 37Mbps via speedtest.net through the cheap $5 router I got at a garage sale, but that's only when no one else is trying to use it at the same time....that poor router can't handle more than one device before or it can't handle the traffic.

 

I'll take pictures tomorrow of my set up and post them.


Edited by El Vato, 17 September 2013 - 12:14 AM.

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#8 ONLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 12:26 AM

That is correct.

The downstairs router is connected to the DSL modem directly via CAT5e cable, but the upstairs router is connected to a wired CCK, down through the RG6 into the basement where the RG6 connects to a SWM8 splitter, then into the SWM16 module, through a second CCK that provides the WH cloud with an internet connection, then to the DSL modem.

I've peaked at about 37Mbps via speedtest.net through the cheap $5 router I got at a garage sale, but that's only when no one else is trying to use it at the same time....that poor router can't handle more than one device before or it can't handle the traffic.

I'll take pictures tomorrow of my set up and post them.



I would not run my whole wireless network if you have a lot of stuff through it, its just not the way to go. I'd pull a proper cat line up to it. Maybe even to a different place if need be. You aren't going to get gigabyte speeds. But then what's your Internet speed and how much is talking from one device to another too I suppose.

The issue I see is if everyone is pulling stuff of large quantity, it might lock up your Whole Home Service some.

With that said, yeah, sounds like your router up top is the bottle neck right now, it should probably move better speeds than that if your close to it, and it shouldn't crack under two things accessing it for simple stuff. I'd upgrade it then when you have the time, pull a new wire as well.

At the very least,if you have two coaxs already run by chance with one unused right now, I'd run a separate deca network just for the Internet feed to the router up stairs.wouldn't cost to much to get one extra deca which is all you would need. You didn't say, but I was also assuming there's a splitter next to the deca upstairs because there's also a box next to it, and that its not on a home run line just for the router. If so, I'd definetly at least pick up another deca as I just said. Very simple to isolate the DIRECTV stuff from the regular that way and maybe boost you a bit if your doing a lot of Whole Home Service sometimes. You can find decas on eBay pretty cheap.


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#9 OFFLINE   El Vato

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 12:36 AM

Turns out that our house has two coax terminals per TV location. The bottom terminal is the one for the Genie in the living room while the top terminal is the one I'm using for my project router.

There is a prewired CAT5 terminal in the kitchen that I can place the router at, though the wife might consider it unsightly on the counter. The CAT5 connection works and is actually plugged in to the DSL modem in the basement.

I'm thinking of putting the new router upstairs and run some speed tests with multiple devices and see what happens.

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#10 ONLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 05:27 AM

There may be at least two other products that aren't usually in the DECA cloud:

1. DIRECTV2PC
2. GenieGo

 

And the bandwidth required on either (or both) of those is nowhere near 100 Mbs.



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#11 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 05:34 AM

And the bandwidth required on either (or both) of those is nowhere near 100 Mbs.

Indeed - spot on.


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#12 OFFLINE   tbolt

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 09:48 AM

There may be at least two other products that aren't usually in the DECA cloud:

1. DIRECTV2PC
2. GenieGo

 

harsh is correct.

 

Both of these solutions utilize the CCK (Broadband DECA) as the path

to your receivers.

 

So, to say that the CCK (Broadband DECA) only handles Internet traffic

is incorrect.

 

The CCK (Broadband DECA) also handles LAN Network traffic for the

GenieGo and Directv2pc applications.



#13 ONLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:41 AM

Excuse me for my error.  The OP has a bigger problem and didn't mention GG or D2PC.



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#14 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:02 AM

And to add to the myth :grin: I have a 6 system DECA cloud bridged to a 7 system Switched Ethernet fabric via the CCK. "Fast Ethernet" 10/100 full duplex works completely transparently between the fabrics.

 

That being said, I would not attempt to add wireless access points or other non DirectTV service traffic into your DECA cloud but you could buy the pieces and leverage the extra coax drops to create a separate one for those needs.

 

Don "my story and I'm sticking to it" Bolton

harsh is correct.

 

Both of these solutions utilize the CCK (Broadband DECA) as the path

to your receivers.

 

So, to say that the CCK (Broadband DECA) only handles Internet traffic

is incorrect.

 

The CCK (Broadband DECA) also handles LAN Network traffic for the

GenieGo and Directv2pc applications.


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#15 OFFLINE   El Vato

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 03:48 PM

Folks,

 

Here are the pictures I took.

 

One pictures shows the router with the yellow CAT5 cable connected to the CCK.

 

Second picture is of where the CCK connects to the top COAX wall connection (bottom COAX is for the HR44 in the living room).

 

Third picture shows the basement set up with two SWM16 modules (only one is powered on), DSL modem, Asus router, four SWM8 splitters (only two are in use right now).  You can see where an unused SWM16 power inserter and unused CCK are located (left SWM16 module is unused at the moment).

 

I'm thinking of employing the unused CCK for a direct connection to the COAX that feeds the upstairs router and plug that CCK directly to the DSL modem.

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Edited by El Vato, 17 September 2013 - 03:49 PM.

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#16 ONLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:01 PM


I'm thinking of employing the unused CCK for a direct connection to the COAX that feeds the upstairs router and plug that CCK directly to the DSL modem.


This is exactly what I'd do.


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#17 OFFLINE   mdavej

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 12:34 PM

This IS exactly what I do.

 

Even though I don't have DirecTV anymore, DECA is still the backbone of my home LAN since I have no wired ethernet but do have coax in most rooms. It's super cheap to do too, with the price per node running about $10 on ebay (sometimes as low as $3 if you buy in bulk). I think I have at least 8 DCA2PR0-01 kits in my house now, all for less than the cost of a single pair of MoCA adapters. It's a great, cheap networking solution if you can't or simply don't want to run cat5/6 everywhere. And it's far more reliable than wireless or my old power line ethernet system.



#18 OFFLINE   Diana C

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 06:36 AM

When trying to project performance you need to look at the slowest link. While a pair of DECAs will provide 100Mbit/sec performance across a segment of RG6, most wireless connections will top out at an average of 50 Mbits/sec or so. If you have multiple wireless devices contending for access to a LOCAL device on the other side of the coax link (like a NAS) then the coax might cause congestion.

On the other hand, if you are accessing the Internet, then unless your Internet service is 100mbit/sec or more (unlikely with DSL) that will be the point of congestion. Think of it like water through a pipe. All the pipes in your house could be 1 inch pipes, but if the main water feed is only 1/2 inch then you'll never get more water out of any faucet than a 1/2 inch pipe can carry, no matter how big you make your internal pipes.

Bottom line, if you are seeing the WRT120n bogging down during Internet access, the problem is unlikely to be contention on the coax. Even if you had a megabit connection between the WRT120n's location and the Asus, you would likely see little or no difference in overall performance.

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