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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Install in a house pre-wired for cable with cable internet


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15 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   arw547

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 03:51 PM

It's been a few years since I was last with DirecTV and I had some questions about installation.  Since then I have moved to a newer house that has cable outlets in all bedrooms plus the living room and office.  I currently have Cox cable for TV, internet, and phone.  Since Cox is the only option here for internet other than DSL and their service is expensive, I've been thinking about switching back to DirecTV for TV and just keeping the cable internet.  Right now I have a single cable that comes in from the outside to a small access panel in my master bedroom closet.  From there it is split and goes back up through the attic to each bedroom, the living room, and office.  I have a Tivo with cable card in the livng room and master bedroom and the office has the cable modem/router.  The 3 other bedrooms just have basic cable without cable boxes.  What I want to do is keep the cable internet in the office and get DirecTV in the 4 bedrooms and living room.  I was thinking about getting the Genie in the living room and genie mini's in each of the 4 bedrooms.  I understand that only 3 minis can be active at once but the 4th bedroom is just a guest room and wouldn't get much use.  Am I missing something or would this work well?  What if I was recording 2 or 3 things and wanted to use the 3 minis?  Would it be better to get an HD-DVR along with the mini?

 

When I was last with DirecTV a long time ago, I had to have 2 lines run to each DVR which created a mess of cabling in my last house.  If I switch back to DirecTV, I was hoping that the installer could just run a single new line from the dish outside to the access panel in my closet and then use the existing lines that go to the other rooms are currently used for cable TV.  However, I would like to keep one line for the cable modem in the office.  Is this possible, or am I looking at more than one line entering the house from the dish?  Is this a simple install or is there a chance I could end up with more holes drilled in my walls and cabling everywhere?  The wife will not be happy if I have a messy install and holes in the ceilings/walls so I'm trying to get as much info as possible.  Another question I had is if I don't have a power outlet in my master bedroom closet, how would the power inserter be installed near the access panel.  Finally, is the protection plan worth it?  Thanks in advance for any responses.

 



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#2 ONLINE   peds48

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 03:56 PM

Since you will be getting SWM, only one cable is needed per receiver, regardless of type.  the tech should be able to use the pre existing cables.


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#3 OFFLINE   samrs

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:15 PM

The protection plan is worth it, sign up with the Tech.


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#4 OFFLINE   longrider

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:53 PM

The power inserter is also not an issue, it can be placed by one of the receivers inline with the receiver coax and that line gets hooked to the power passing port of the splitter


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#5 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:24 PM

As long as you are don't need the coax serving your internet, you'll be fine. A single coax from the dish can support up to 8 tuners. That can be a Genie plus clients, a Genie plus other DVRs and receivers, or just a mix of DVRs and receivers, whatever works for you as long as it doesn't exceed 8 tuners.

 

If you go over 8 tuners, then you need four coax from the dish to an external SWM16 multiswitch. From that you need one coax for each 8 tuners, so two coax to support 16 tuners.



#6 OFFLINE   trh

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:57 PM

He said he wants to keep the cable internet in his office. So a simple barrel connector in the closet for the cable, but how does he tie the internet back into his DirecTV setup?



#7 ONLINE   peds48

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 07:40 PM

He said he wants to keep the cable internet in his office. So a simple barrel connector in the closet for the cable, but how does he tie the internet back into his DirecTV setup?

options are 

 

1. run an ethernet cable to Genie

2. run another coax to office from closet or any DirecTV receiver location

3. less preferred, wireless


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#8 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 07:53 PM

As long as you are don't need the coax serving your internet, you'll be fine. ...

 

 

He said he wants to keep the cable internet in his office. So a simple barrel connector in the closet for the cable, but how does he tie the internet back into his DirecTV setup?

Yes, I probably could have worded my response better. What I meant was: As long as the coax being used for his internet connection isn't needed for the DirecTV installation, he'll be fine.



#9 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:00 AM

If you want to keep your cable modem you could diplex the cable company line to the Directv line outside the house so you use only the one existing coax entering your house, then have a second diplexer inside the house near your access panel that splits the two signals back out over separate cables. The SAT side goes to the SWM splitter (which replaces the cable splitter you have there now) from which it is then distributed around your house via the access panel. The ANT/CATV side goes to your cable modem.

 

This won't interfere with whole home in this case because all the whole home communication would take place via the splitter, it does not use those frequencies to communicate with the dish. It works fine with the power inserter because diplexers are designed to pass current on the SAT side but not the ANT/CATV side.

 

There are some diplexers made specifically to work with Directv SWM that could be used for this purpose. The NAS 9501 is probably the one you want, you could pick up two of them for about $10 or so. If you have Directv do the install, don't even mention the diplexer, they'll tell you it won't work. Just let them do the install and then add the diplexers later.


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#10 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:13 AM

If you want to keep your cable modem you could diplex the cable company line to the Directv line outside the house so you use only the one existing coax entering your house, then have a second diplexer inside the house near your access panel that splits the two signals back out over separate cables.

This doesn't always work as some cable systems have moved internet into the 800-1000 MHz range.


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#11 OFFLINE   arw547

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:56 AM

Thanks everyone for the replies, I've ordered and hopefully the install goes well.



#12 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 06:01 PM

This doesn't always work as some cable systems have moved internet into the 800-1000 MHz range.

More specifically, DOCSIS 3.0 ranges from 5-85MHz on the uplink side and from 108MHz to 1002MHz on the downlink side.

Now that I think about it, it may occupy pretty much everything but the FM radio station band (that some cable systems forward).

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#13 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 06:16 PM

More specifically, DOCSIS 3.0 ranges from 5-85MHz on the uplink side and from 108MHz to 1002MHz on the downlink side.

Now that I think about it, it may occupy pretty much everything but the FM radio station band (that some cable systems forward).

The only part that matters is above 900 MHz which causes problems with SWiM.


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#14 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:20 AM

The only part that matters is above 900 MHz which causes problems with SWiM.

DECA is well below 900MHz and that's drop-dead critical as we're talking about how to ferry TCP/IP packets from the office to the DECA cloud.

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#15 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:24 PM

DECA is well below 900MHz and that's drop-dead critical as we're talking about how to ferry TCP/IP packets from the office to the DECA cloud.

 

 

If you read back in the thread, we were discussing diplexing CATV to avoid needing a second cable going through the outside wall, to serve a cable modem. DECA is irrelevant in that case since it doesn't need to travel beyond the SWM splitter (unless you have a SWM16 mounted outside, which OP does not)

 

What VOS was talking about in the comment you quoted is how cable modems using DOCSIS 3.0 may utilitize frequencies over 900 MHz, which would be a problem for diplexing. If OP's cable system doesn't use those frequencies, then diplexing would work for him - though there's a risk if they change something it might cause problems with his internet.

 

DSL is smart enough to only use those frequencies it is able to use, which it discovers during the connection setup training phase, but I have no idea if DOCSIS 3.0 works the same way. It is probably more important for DSL to do this because most copper phone lines have impairments at certain frequencies due to bridge taps. If DOCSIS 3.0 works the same way, it would detect the diplexer blocking frequencies above 900 MHz during connection setup and configure to use only those frequencies the diplexer allows to pass.

 

If someone out there has a cable modem they know uses frequencies above 900 MHz, I'd be curious to know what happens if you put a diplexer in line with it....is it smart enough to detect that impairment and work around it, or does your internet grind to a halt?


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#16 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:18 AM

If you read back in the thread, we were discussing diplexing CATV to avoid needing a second cable going through the outside wall, to serve a cable modem.

If you read some of the more recent posts, there was discussion about how to get the cloud connected to the Internet in the office and that could make DECA a big issue for those who are determined to use it in its "wired" incarnation.

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