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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Uninterrupted Power Supply UPS


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71 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 09:45 AM

there is no switcher over because the electronics devices are always running off the batteries.  so when the power goes out, it does not stop powering the devices but rather it stops charging the batteries.

Some UPS devices work this way, especially higher end models. Many lower cost consumer UPS devices do in fact switch over from mains to inverter power on loss of mains.



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#22 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 11:56 AM

Yep, I meant to say consistant voltage.

I should do a better job of proofreading what I write.

 

Everybody should do a better job of proofreading.  I do it with every post and I'm always surprised at how many mistakes I make. And I still see mistakes after I post.

 

While the cheaper UPS devices won't guarantee a constant voltage (should be around 117VAC), they do come pretty close.  He should have never told you that.  They simply aren't electricians (not that there are that many really good electricians out there either).  You did the right thing.

 

Rich



#23 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 11:59 AM

Ive run my DVR's (Dish and Directv) off UPS's for years, including the power inserter. I use APC and Cyberpower.

 

I've got all the networking devices on UPS, I just don't have all the HRs on them.  The instant I lose power, I start shutting down all my UPS devices.  I've got several APCs and one Tripplite.  

 

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#24 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:02 PM

Maybe he was thinking of the switchover time. But then if you always got consistent voltage out of the outlet, there would be no point in a line interactive UPS.

 

I think he just made a mistake out of ignorance.  Ignorance is forgivable, I think, but I hope the installer doesn't keep making that same mistake.  That would be stupidity.

 

Rich 



#25 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:05 PM

There's no "switchover time" in a UPS, at least if it's of any use. Any dropout when the mains is removed that would be enough to cause a SWM PI to completely power off would be way more than enough to cause an attached computer to reboot. Ever notice how if you unplug a SWM PI, the light stays on for a (very) short (or, if there's no LNB connected a very long) time? The way those transformers work there's probably enough residual power to get you over a few millisecond hump while it switches over. 

 

You'd have to look at a sine wave to see where the UPS jumps in.  You're correct in your assumption, I think.  But, I've never seen a transformer show any signs of "residual power".  They're either on or off.  Probably a capacitor that keeps things running for that very brief period where the switch occurs.

 

Rich



#26 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:09 PM

I think there are still quite a few standby UPS's. APC's back-ups line is one. There has to be a switchover time on those. Short yes, but they don't go to battery instantaneously.

 

I've worked on some huge UPS systems and I can tell you the switchover is so close to instantaneous that you can't really tell it's happening except for a very brief flicker of lights.  But, they were all very big and very expensive UPS systems.  I don't really know that much about the smaller, cheaper units except that mine seem to work quite well.

 

Rich



#27 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:10 PM

If there is a switchover time it is short enough for the DTV receiver not to reboot or my light to flicker or my computer and monitors to die.

 

It's kinda like a GFI.  Works so quickly it's almost impossible to measure.  

 

Rich



#28 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:21 PM

Some UPS devices work this way, especially higher end models. Many lower cost consumer UPS devices do in fact switch over from mains to inverter power on loss of mains.

 

Those big UPS systems I mentioned in a previous post not only had banks of batteries but also diesel generators so everything just kept working as if nothing happened.  In a chemical plant, making plastics, you simply cannot allow the briefest of stoppages of process equipment.  

 

The small cheap units, I dunno.  I agree, I don't see how they could make them and sell them that cheaply if they were always inducing voltage.  I know their output voltage varies with the voltage input to them.  I've put meters on them and I've always seen the voltage out vary.

 

Rich



#29 OFFLINE   jimmie57

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

It's kinda like a GFI.  Works so quickly it's almost impossible to measure.  

 

Rich

I do not know. I do know that they work very well for what we are doing.


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#30 OFFLINE   dminches

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 05:57 AM

Do the UPSes degrade video quality?  At one point I had my TV plugged into one and the video was pretty poor.  I wonder if that is true to DVRs too.



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#31 OFFLINE   peds48

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:29 AM

Do the UPSes degrade video quality?  At one point I had my TV plugged into one and the video was pretty poor.  I wonder if that is true to DVRs too.

Nope, as a matter of fact, most retailers will want to sell you one when you buy a TV by telling you it will improve picture quality, which I don't agree.


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#32 OFFLINE   Jim Manis

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 08:42 AM

We had a storm last Friday morning that knocked out my HR44, 55 inch LED TV, cable modem and router that were all plugged in to a APC 750G.  The UPS appears to be fine so I assume the damage came through either the dish or the cable feeding my modem.  Our bedroom TV also lost both HDMI ports.

 

As I am piecing things back together I am considering a different UPS.  On the models that have coax connections, can you/should you run the Directv coax through it? Or if I ran the coax for my cable modem through it, would it affect internet speed?  I want the best protection I can get so I don't lose all my recordings again as well as the insurance deductible.



#33 OFFLINE   peds48

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 09:56 AM

you never want to connect the satellites cables through these devices, it is not recommended.  pretty sure your cable modem will be OK


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#34 OFFLINE   HoTat2

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 10:56 AM

As for the cable modem, it really shouldn't be necessary either;

 

As any incoming CATV lines should be run through at least a single barrel grounding block at the home's POE.

 

And no, it should have have no effect upon internet speed 


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#35 OFFLINE   Jim Manis

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 11:02 AM

Thanks to both of you above



#36 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 11:37 AM

Do the UPSes degrade video quality?  At one point I had my TV plugged into one and the video was pretty poor.  I wonder if that is true to DVRs too.

 

I don't see any difference in PQ and I don't have all my HRs on UPS.  

 

Rich



#37 ONLINE   P Smith

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 12:11 PM

Do the UPSes degrade video quality?  At one point I had my TV plugged into one and the video was pretty poor.  I wonder if that is true to DVRs too.

 

Yes, it could.

If its output voltage is low (on an edge of tolerance your device's power supply) or/and has high level non-sinusoidal conformity and its frequency.



#38 OFFLINE   peds48

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 01:08 PM

Yes, it could.

If its output voltage is low (on an edge of tolerance your device's power supply) or/and has high level non-sinusoidal conformity and its frequency.

so in other words, if its broken!  !rolling


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#39 ONLINE   P Smith

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 01:37 PM

so in other words, if its broken!  !rolling

yeah, LOL, you never seen almost working devices ? kiddo ...



#40 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 02:50 PM

We had a storm last Friday morning that knocked out my HR44, 55 inch LED TV, cable modem and router that were all plugged in to a APC 750G.  The UPS appears to be fine so I assume the damage came through either the dish or the cable feeding my modem.  Our bedroom TV also lost both HDMI ports.

 

As I am piecing things back together I am considering a different UPS.  On the models that have coax connections, can you/should you run the Directv coax through it? Or if I ran the coax for my cable modem through it, would it affect internet speed?  I want the best protection I can get so I don't lose all my recordings again as well as the insurance deductible.

 

If nothing else was damaged it probably did come via cable modem or Directv. You can use the coax protection on the UPS for your cable modem, but unless the specs on the UPS say it is designed for satellite it may filter out the higher frequencies Directv uses. I'm not aware of a UPS with coax protection that's rated for satellite, but there may be some out there.

 

If you want protection for satellite, first of all I'd make sure your dish is properly grounded. Many aren't. That does nothing against a direct or nearly direct strike, but there's a certain range of "near misses" where it'll protect against that, though it is primarily done to protect against AC power getting on the line (power line falling on dish, nail gun accident piercing a power line and coax with one nail, etc.)

 

If your dish is properly grounded and you want a bit of additional protection, you can use this: http://www.summitsou...art-p-7624.html. I use them on mine (four since I have a legacy dish) but some will say they are worthless. For $2.95 plus shipping, it is cheap even if the benefit is limited :) It should be the first thing connected once the satellite line enters the house (i.e. on the "dish side" of any splitters or the PI)


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