Jump to content


Welcome to DBSTalk


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to DBSTalk. Our community covers all aspects of video delivery solutions including: Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS), Cable Television, and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). We also have forums to discuss popular television programs, home theater equipment, and internet streaming service providers. Members of our community include experts who can help you solve technical problems, industry professionals, company representatives, and novices who are here to learn.

Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community. Sign-up is a free and simple process that requires minimal information. Be a part of our community by signing in or creating an account. The Digital Bit Stream starts here!
  • Reply to existing topics or start a discussion of your own
  • Subscribe to topics and forums and get email updates
  • Send private personal messages (PM) to other forum members
  • Customize your profile page and make new friends
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Photo

Google rumored to launch its own TV set-top box under the Nexus brand next year


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Athlon646464

Athlon646464

    Hall Of Fame

  • News Hound
  • 2,862 posts
  • LocationUxbridge, MA
Joined: Feb 23, 2007

Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:08 AM

Google rumored to launch its own TV set-top box under the Nexus brand next year
 
We haven't even seen the latest iteration of Google TV yet -- oops, sorry, that's "Android with Google services for TV" these days -- but a new rumor from The Information's Amir Efrati points to a Nexus-branded set-top box directly from Google in the first half of 2014. 
 
Previous rumors have noted TV-connected hardware focused on videoconferencing and gaming, and this new rumor also focuses on the latter, indicating that at this stage it runs Android game apps with a touchscreen controller, but doesn't carry live TV. The suggestion is that an "aggressively priced" gaming box (that also plays streaming internet video and is controlled by phone or tablet) would give Google the advertising foothold it's looking for on your family's TV screen.
 
 
8-26-2011google-tv-logo3-l.jpg

1 HR34-700, 1 C31-700, 1 HR24-500
Original install on April 20, 2008 - HR34 & C31 installed on August 24, 2013 - HR24 installed on July 23, 2010

Press any key to continue, or any other key to cancel.


...Ads Help To Support This SIte...

#2 OFFLINE   fireponcoal

fireponcoal

    Icon

  • Registered
  • 724 posts
Joined: Sep 26, 2009

Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:45 AM

So we'll be able to to play awful tablet/smart phone games on a TV? So unbelievably unappealing. Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk

Edited by fireponcoal, 07 December 2013 - 06:46 AM.


#3 OFFLINE   dualsub2006

dualsub2006

    Icon

  • Registered
  • 868 posts
Joined: Aug 28, 2007

Posted 07 December 2013 - 08:50 AM

So we'll be able to to play awful tablet/smart phone games on a TV? So unbelievably unappealing.Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk

I want to start this by saying that first and foremost, I'm a Nintendo Gamer. After that, I'm a PS3 gamer.

Now, I also have an Ouya, and it's an Android based console that goes beyond touch games. It's not teeming with quality games, but the list grows constantly.

If Google does this (and I remain unconvinced that they will) this Google box will have the Google Play Store behind it, and Android fans far and wide will buy it.

Ouya lacks buyers and killer games, which are both things that Google could have an easier time overcoming given their reach with consumers and developers alike.
  • fireponcoal likes this

#4 OFFLINE   fireponcoal

fireponcoal

    Icon

  • Registered
  • 724 posts
Joined: Sep 26, 2009

Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:16 AM

Ouya is ok in that I'm pretty sure it would make a pretty nice MAME box. Now that they sell them in Target perhaps more punters will take the plunge. It's sort of a hidden item even when one is shopping in the electronics department of Target. It's not garnering a whole lot of shelf space either. Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk

#5 OFFLINE   dualsub2006

dualsub2006

    Icon

  • Registered
  • 868 posts
Joined: Aug 28, 2007

Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:32 AM

I knew about Ouya, but I just happened upon it on the bottom shelf in Target. Ouya is supposed to be putting shelf displays in Target nationwide, and some locations have them. I do believe it includes a demo station too. Google has great distribution with both Amazon and Best Buy as well as Staples. People would get the chance to see this instead of just stumbling upon it in the castoff aisle at Target.

#6 OFFLINE   peds48

peds48

    🙈🙉🙊📡

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 12,281 posts
  • LocationLong Island, NY
Joined: Jan 10, 2008

Posted 08 December 2013 - 08:34 AM

Ouya lacks buyers and killer games, which are both things that Google could have an easier time overcoming given their reach with consumers and developers alike.

The problem with Android, has been proven time and time again, is that while they love to download apps, they hate paying for them

 

http://appleinsider....ad-than-android

 

http://www.theguardi...oogle-play-apps


Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits. The rebels.
The the troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.

The ones who see things different.
They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.


Think Differently 

#7 OFFLINE   dualsub2006

dualsub2006

    Icon

  • Registered
  • 868 posts
Joined: Aug 28, 2007

Posted 08 December 2013 - 09:21 AM

The problem with Android, has been proven time and time again, is that while they love to download apps, they hate paying for them

 

Yep, there is a huge disparity in revenue between the App Store and the Play Store, but if you look at who is making money on Google Play, and then consider that we're talking about gaming here, the point is pointless. As I'm sure one or maybe even both of those articles that you linked points out, free-to-play and ad supported games on Android have huge payouts.

 

The developers making money on Google Play publish games, and those high grossing games are all low cost with heavy in-game purchasing opportunities, or they are straight free-to-play, or as I like to call them, pay-to-win. You can go to the Play Store on the web and see it for yourself. Every single top grossing game will be listed as "free".

 

Games do exceedingly well on all platforms, even Windows Phone 8. You can't look only at the bottom line for the entire store and say that there is no contest. There are a lot of game developers cleaning up on Google Play. Even the lowly little Ouya employs a free-to-try angle for every single game, and a good number of those are free-to-play.

 

Apple used to lead both in apps available, app downloads and revenue generated. They no longer lead in apps available or app downloads, and whether either of your two articles points this out or not, the revenue gap is closing, albeit at a slower pace. I don't know that the gap ever closes entirely, but I do think that like every other lead that Apple has had, this one will evaporate as well.






Protected By... spam firewall...And...