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'Oh my gosh!' Raleigh woman's snow photo goes viral


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#1 OFFLINE   Mark Holtz

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 11:24 AM

From WRAL:

'Oh my gosh!' Raleigh woman's snow photo goes viral

Of the thousands of snow photos taken in North Carolina on Wednesday, one of the most talked about and shared shots came from a Raleigh woman who captured the chaos on Glenwood Avenue.

The photo, which shows a car on fire as vehicles struggle nearby to get up a snow-slicked hill on Glenwood Avenue, quickly spread across the Internet and was featured on several sites, including CNN, The Huffington Post, Gawker, Slate and Reddit.


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#2 OFFLINE   Cholly

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:10 PM

At the time those pictures were taken, less than 3 inches had fallen at Raleigh - Durham airport. Totals in the Triangle area this morning ranged from 3.6 inches to 8 inches. They;'re dealing with freezing rain now. Here in my town of Indian Trail, over 6 inches had fallen before turning to freezing rain. An additional 1 to 3 inches of snow are expected this afternoon before it all ends later today. Main roads are being cleared by NC Dept. of Transportation. Residential roads aren't so lucky.

 

Being a transplant  in 2005 from the hilly Southern Tier of New York, I'm somewhat bemused. Back there, storms of a foot or more were common. All roads where school buses traveled were plowed, not just main roads. After the plows went through, I'd be out with my snow blower and shovels, cleaning off our driveway, front walk and patio.


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#3 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

At the time those pictures were taken, less than 3 inches had fallen at Raleigh - Durham airport. Totals in the Triangle area this morning ranged from 3.6 inches to 8 inches. They;'re dealing with freezing rain now. Here in my town of Indian Trail, over 6 inches had fallen before turning to freezing rain. An additional 1 to 3 inches of snow are expected this afternoon before it all ends later today. Main roads are being cleared by NC Dept. of Transportation. Residential roads aren't so lucky.

 

Being a transplant  in 2005 from the hilly Southern Tier of New York, I'm somewhat bemused. Back there, storms of a foot or more were common. All roads where school buses traveled were plowed, not just main roads. After the plows went through, I'd be out with my snow blower and shovels, cleaning off our driveway, front walk and patio.

 

My ship was home-ported in Norfolk, VA.  They used to close the schools when the snow started to stick on the roads.  Many times those schools closed and we never had more than an inch or so of snow.  At the time, Norfolk didn't have much in the way of snow removal equipment or supplies and the Navy sent their vehicles and supplies into the city to clear the streets.  Of an inch (maybe) of snow.

 

Rich



#4 OFFLINE   Drucifer

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 02:31 PM

Snow chains seem to have disappeared from the roadways with this generation of drivers.

 

Drive unprepared. Die unprepared.


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#5 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:12 PM

This storm and last week's had more to do with ice than snow.


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#6 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:34 PM

Today's cars offer traction control systems, anti lock brakes and all sorts of other detraction from a person's having to actually learn to drive a car under most conditions. We rarely drive just to drive about, instead we are herded en mass by schedules. Always in a hurry, rarely understanding our vehicles

 

Add to this, that getting a drivers license means proving you can "operate" a motor vehicle but in no way validates you understand car control, where you should focus when driving, THAT you should focus when driving. Instead you have to take a test about enforced rules the most of which are designed to dumb down driving enough so virtually anyone can "earn" the privilege to drive. Even the insurance industry has admitted a large number of licensed drivers shouldn't be on the road. And this is under the best of conditions.

 

Don "if but for several centuries time and the industrial revolution this would be natural selection at work here" Bolton

 

Snow chains seem to have disappeared from the roadways with this generation of drivers.

 

Drive unprepared. Die unprepared.


What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#7 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 11:59 PM

Full disclosure...  I was born and have lived all of my life in NC.  There are multiple balls in the air here...

 

Driving on snow is completely different than driving on ice.  People from the north seem to be no better at understanding this distinction than people in the south.  I have zero issues driving on the snow, but I try and stay off the roads when they are covered in ice.  Chains do nothing for you on ice.  Four wheel drive does little to nothing for you on ice.

 

In most of NC there is very little average snowfall for the winter... and usually not "big" storms to speak of most years.  We certainly could pay and have a lot of road-clearing equipment that sits around most of the winter and most years... but that would normally be a waste of money for the rare times we do wish we had more equipment to clear the roads.  It is a judgement call that pays off most years.  It isn't like in the north where you can depend on routinely needing to clear lots of snow.

 

Also... in the larger cities to the north, people are closer together... so you don't have to clear nearly as much road to get the city going again.  Things are spread out more here... so we need to clear more roads in a shorter period of time to get things going.  In a city like New York, for example, there are lots of things in walking distance for a lot of people... so people can get out and get around much more quickly in those areas.

 

We are generally prepared for a much smaller storm.. so if you're being fair... you'd have to compare say when 30-40+ inches get dumped in the north... and you'll note it takes them a while to dig out of that if it is over a large enough area... so they too can be overwhelmed when a storm larger than what they normally budget for hits.

 

And again, to revisit the ice vs snow...   freezing rain and ice tends to collect on trees and power lines... and it makes stuff fall... and creates a lot of havoc beyond the unsafe roads... and here in NC we have a much more likelihood of an ice storm than they do in the north typically.  There also isn't much you can do to prepare for an ice storm really... you can only react to it.


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#8 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 01:08 AM

Full disclosure... 

 

Chains do nothing for you on ice.  Four wheel drive does little to nothing for you on ice.

Four New England winters in the USAF gave me "some insight" into snow & ice.

Three of them was with a four wheel drive.

There was one ice storm and four wheel drive has "zero effect".

Chains have "some effect" and studded tires maybe slightly more, but they need to be on all four wheels with a four wheel drive.

Anything less than chaining/studding all four corners and you have "zero chance" of being under any kind of control.


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#9 OFFLINE   Mark Holtz

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 07:16 AM

Driving on snow is completely different than driving on ice.  People from the north seem to be no better at understanding this distinction than people in the south.  I have zero issues driving on the snow, but I try and stay off the roads when they are covered in ice.  Chains do nothing for you on ice.  Four wheel drive does little to nothing for you on ice.
 
In most of NC there is very little average snowfall for the winter... and usually not "big" storms to speak of most years.  We certainly could pay and have a lot of road-clearing equipment that sits around most of the winter and most years... but that would normally be a waste of money for the rare times we do wish we had more equipment to clear the roads.  It is a judgement call that pays off most years.  It isn't like in the north where you can depend on routinely needing to clear lots of snow.


So, how are you on hurricanes? Because, to me, that is more likely to hit your area than this recent severe weather. IIRC, even if you aren't hit by a hurricane and it's high winds, heavy rainfall is still very likely.

To me, the weather as depicted in the photo above (icy roads, heavier than expected snowfall) is the key reason why I accumulate lots of PTO so that I only feel a pang of guilt in calling in and saying "I'm not coming in" instead of panicking.
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#10 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 09:37 AM

"the only winning move is not to play" From Wargames :)

 

Snow is tractable until incompetent motorists spin and polish it down to ice. Ice actually is tractable to a point until incompetent motorists polish it down to a wet  smooth finish. A car with properly sized tires for its mass operates well under either condition with a competent driver. Proper tires being narrower than the typical "performance" tires most gravitate to. Like a hull, tires displace snow/sand/ice/water with respect to speed and weight.

 

Using (releasing) the brake pedal like a clutch (auto trans here) will gain starting traction even on sheet ice, braking application works the same it must be smooth and subtle. It all comes down to feel and tire sizing to vehicle mass play a large part in this. I had  Geo Metro at one point an I could drive it on ice just like a wet road more or less. My next car a Saturn wagon was outright scary on snow/ice at any speed.

 

My Volvo XC70 is a dream to buzz about on the backroads in the slop but I avoid the chaos in town. For me the snow and ice out here is an exercise as to how hard I can drive the car and not activate the traction control or antilocks. Skills I try to keep fresh as I age. (my excuse for still playing like that) :)

 

I always tell people if you aren't confident doing it DON'T. The damage you may incur on going out on that one day to work could inhibit going to work for  months.

 

Don "IMO all drivers should take a local race organizations driver training course to learn car control and how to pay attention" Bolton

So, how are you on hurricanes? Because, to me, that is more likely to hit your area than this recent severe weather. IIRC, even if you aren't hit by a hurricane and it's high winds, heavy rainfall is still very likely.

To me, the weather as depicted in the photo above (icy roads, heavier than expected snowfall) is the key reason why I accumulate lots of PTO so that I only feel a pang of guilt in calling in and saying "I'm not coming in" instead of panicking.


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What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#11 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 11:32 AM

Ice actually is tractable to a point.

 

Don "IMO all drivers should take a local race organizations driver training course to learn car control and how to pay attention" Bolton

And "the point" came having to turn in the black ice storm I posted above.

My "first clue" was falling on my ass walking to the truck. :lol:

I understand "car control" quite well.

I could get my Bronco "pointed" the right direction, but finished each turn against the outside curb.


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#12 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 12:57 PM

Snow chains seem to have disappeared from the roadways with this generation of drivers.

 

Drive unprepared. Die unprepared.

 

My postman uses them.  I think they all do.  

 

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#13 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 01:09 PM

So, how are you on hurricanes? Because, to me, that is more likely to hit your area than this recent severe weather. IIRC, even if you aren't hit by a hurricane and it's high winds, heavy rainfall is still very likely.

To me, the weather as depicted in the photo above (icy roads, heavier than expected snowfall) is the key reason why I accumulate lots of PTO so that I only feel a pang of guilt in calling in and saying "I'm not coming in" instead of panicking.

 

I think we do ok with hurricanes.  There's not a lot you can do, though...  the low areas and coastal areas are going to have some flooding... but the areas inland and high areas usually do not.  Some structures can be built to withstand the high winds, others it isn't cost-effective to do so... but it seems like it is older structures that fall when we have a hurricane blow through.


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#14 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:15 PM

Narrower width tires would actually have helped but when the surface of the ice is wet as black ice usually is grip is only found in your hands (and perhaps butt cheeks) :( We get some nasty ice storms here from time to time.

 

I recall getting a take and bake pizza once during one of these ice storms and did an instant butt flop as I walked behind the car. Saved the pizza but my tailbone hurt something fierce.

 

Got caught out on an early AM bicycle ride up in the local foothills once where the road had an ice dusting from likely a freezing fog. I stuck to the road edge where cars hadn't ventured riding on the white and still tacky to the touch ice for about five miles before I was out of it. I wouldn't recommend this, nonetheless it was tractable enough that an even smooth pedal stroke and a soft handed handlebar grip for corrections that I got through it without problems.

 

Don "Ice itself bad, wet ice VERY BAD! you go first :) " Bolton

And "the point" came having to turn in the black ice storm I posted above.

My "first clue" was falling on my ass walking to the truck. :lol:

I understand "car control" quite well.

I could get my Bronco "pointed" the right direction, but finished each turn against the outside curb.


What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#15 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:32 PM

Narrower width tires would actually have helped but...

 

Don "Ice itself bad, wet ice VERY BAD! you go first :) " Bolton

While they might have, it was nice to have enough tire to cushion the impacts with the curbs, as no matter what I tried, they always were "the finish" of my turns.

Think things "might have been" better if I had studs on all four corners.
.


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#16 OFFLINE   lugnutathome

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:42 PM

Yeah but those poor guys on the corners would have gotten beaten up so that they wouldn't be "studs" anymore. OH studded tires :)

 

Don "Nevermind" Bolton

 

While they might have, it was nice to have enough tire to cushion the impacts with the curbs, as no matter what I tried, they always were "the finish" of my turns.

Think things "might have been" better if I had studs on all four corners.
.


What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?


#17 OFFLINE   James Long

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:14 PM

The photo, which shows a car on fire as vehicles struggle nearby to get up a snow-slicked hill on Glenwood Avenue, quickly spread across the Internet and was featured on several sites, including CNN, The Huffington Post, Gawker, Slate and Reddit.


I carry fire extinguishers in my van. I needed one once when I was out driving and was fortunate enough to smother an engine fire without one. So I have carried ever since. Catch the fire early and the car might be salvageable - if not drivable.

My second car fire was in winter where I burned up a starter - literally. I used both extinguishers to kill the flames before the fire department arrived. They confirmed that there was evidence of a fire and left. The car was only worth a couple hundred dollars so we replaced it.

I learned to drive in Michigan ... in mid summer of course. But most of my early driving experience was in Michigan and Indiana. I've always used all weather tires and have not had a problem ... but I don't buy the cheapest tires and I replace them when they are worn. No chains. I remember going up a hill similar to the one pictured and passing cars that were not making it up as they rolled back down. That hill was closed during the most recent set of storms.

Take it easy.
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#18 OFFLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 08:04 PM

You'll realize that you have NO control when you're stopped on a bridge and your car/ truck / van starts sliding in some direction that you absolutely have no control.

 

And you hope there's not a lot of room to slide so the damage is minimized.



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#19 OFFLINE   James Long

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 09:08 PM

You'll realize that you have NO control when you're stopped on a bridge and your car/ truck / van starts sliding in some direction that you absolutely have no control.
 
And you hope there's not a lot of room to slide so the damage is minimized.


I realize that you have absolutely no control over my vehicle ... unless of course you hit me (or you are a traffic officer). There are always situations where there is no control - in my experience the biggest threat has been the other driver. That jerk who thinks they can drive the speed limit (or faster) despite the road being covered in 8" of slush. People who follow too close or drive like it is sunny and dry.

Many years, lots of snow. One snow/ice related accident back when I was young.

Perhaps your comment wasn't specifically aimed at me. But it is possible to drive in the worst weather. And I agree, part of that is knowing where to drive (which roads and bridges to avoid and which will be passable) and knowing when not to drive (there are times where it is just too dangerous).
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#20 OFFLINE   dennisj00

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 11:26 PM

No, it wasn't aimed at you or anyone in particular.  It's just a fact that sometimes the weather overtakes you and you're SOL.

 

We were commuting into Charlotte one morning (before everyone got minute (detailed) weather forecasts), sitting in traffic and literally watched the bridge freeze over when cars just started to slide into each other.

 

In those days, we went to work, hell or high water.  Today, we can do more work by staying home!



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