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Guest Message by DevFuse

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OnDemand content a bandwidth hog


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30 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   sdk009

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:57 AM

Since we have Hughesnet, we can't waste any of monthly allowance of 20gbs on any OnDemand program.



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#22 OFFLINE   lokar

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:10 AM

It seems the FCC doesn't care about any of this anymore.

They never have.  Every ownership cap that was ever in place has been eroded or done away with in the last 20 years.  They have always been an agency that will shut down a pirate radio station someone runs out of their attic within days but they have not done anything about all the mergers that are terrible for consumers and this country.



#23 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 12:44 PM

Since we have Hughesnet, we can't waste any of monthly allowance of 20gbs on any OnDemand program.


Doesn't the limit go away in the middle in the night? Maybe only download during that time frame?

#24 OFFLINE   Beerstalker

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 02:04 PM

Doesn't the limit go away in the middle in the night? Maybe only download during that time frame?

 

I don't think that is the case anymore with their new plans/speeds.

 

With the old daily allowances there was a timeframe (between 2 and 6 CST if I remember right) when you could download anything you want.  Now their plans have switched to a monthly allowance.  I believe with the new plans it is more like you have 10GB you can use any time of day for the whole month, and 10GB you can use at night during the BonusBytes time or something like that.  I'm not 100% sure though as I dropped HughesNet a couple years ago as soon as WISP was available.  Now I have no caps and similar speeds to my old HughesNet (2Meg down) for half the cost.  The new plans did interest me at first since they now have much better speeds, but with the caps and the much higher price I have decided to stay with my WISP.


Edited by Beerstalker, 26 February 2014 - 02:05 PM.

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#25 OFFLINE   GregLee

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 10:10 AM

My local telco, Hawaiian Telcom, also does not enforce data caps for my DSL service, but it has them.  They are there in the contract (which I actually read).  If lots of its customers "cut the cable" and started getting all their TV over the internet via DSL, it's hard to imagine that the telcos would pass up the chance for extra revenue by continuing to let people stream TV over their lines without charging more.

 

With the advent of 4k TV, soon we will need to supply more bandwidth into homes -- more than broadcast TV or blu-ray can currently handle.  This is even more the case if the new UHD standard is exploited by using 10 bit color  (and I hope that happens).  So how is that all going to work?  The TV people are saying, oh, we'll get the extra data to people over the internet.  Netflix, or something.  But how can they do that if homes are still so limited in the internet bandwidth they can receive?

 

The answer to that, I'm afraid, is going to be lots more data compression, with a concomitant loss of picture quality.  The only way to avoid that, so long as cable and telco don't want to spend the money to build optical fiber out to individual homes, is for DirecTV to find a way to use the high bandwidth route they have into people's homes to carry the new UHD TV signals.


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#26 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 01:12 PM

They have to be careful when not enforcing and then suddenly befor ing a rule years latter. They could get used for that I believe and lose. It will be interesting.

#27 ONLINE   LameLefty

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 02:03 PM

In my area, Comcast most definitely enforces them, to the point that if you exceed it they charge you a set amount in 10 GB chunks as you exceed it. 

 

Due to a change in my work circumstances in late January, I ended up being at home quite a bit through February and hit the limit a few days ago after watching the entire series run of HOMELAND and buying a couple movies through iTunes.


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#28 OFFLINE   WB4CS

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:09 PM

My local telco, Hawaiian Telcom, also does not enforce data caps for my DSL service, but it has them.  They are there in the contract (which I actually read).  If lots of its customers "cut the cable" and started getting all their TV over the internet via DSL, it's hard to imagine that the telcos would pass up the chance for extra revenue by continuing to let people stream TV over their lines without charging more.

 

With the advent of 4k TV, soon we will need to supply more bandwidth into homes -- more than broadcast TV or blu-ray can currently handle.  This is even more the case if the new UHD standard is exploited by using 10 bit color  (and I hope that happens).  So how is that all going to work?  The TV people are saying, oh, we'll get the extra data to people over the internet.  Netflix, or something.  But how can they do that if homes are still so limited in the internet bandwidth they can receive?

 

The answer to that, I'm afraid, is going to be lots more data compression, with a concomitant loss of picture quality.  The only way to avoid that, so long as cable and telco don't want to spend the money to build optical fiber out to individual homes, is for DirecTV to find a way to use the high bandwidth route they have into people's homes to carry the new UHD TV signals.

 

 

4K ?! What a joke :)  

 

We're years away from 4K being anything more than a novelty item. And even then it's doubtful that 4K will be used for broadcast TV. At MOST we may see home movies (like Blu Ray) go to 4K. It will take years for 4K TVs to come out of the several thousand dollar range, and growth for 4K is moving slow because there's no content available for it. 

 

I imagine if broadcast TV does start to use 4K, satellite providers would have to launch more satellites. DirecTV could do it if they dropped ALL SD channels to free up some bandwidth but with the thousands of SD receivers out there that's not likely going to happen. What we'd probably see is DirecTV launch a new set of satellites for 4K and you choose between either a SD/HD setup like you have now, or a different dish to view the 4K satellites. Cable companies would have to move to IPTV and update their infrastructure considerably in order to pipe out that much bandwidth for 4K channels. Even if all this happens, again, it's years away. 

 

I wouldn't hold my breath on 4K becoming the next standard in home TV. 



#29 OFFLINE   fleckrj

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:43 PM

I agree that 4K is a long way away.  We are 18 years on since the acceptance of the ATSC standard by the FCC, and we are only as far along as we are becaue of a government mandate that forced the switch.  There were advantages to the government of forcing everyone to switch from NTSC to ATSC in the form of getting more information into less bandwith, thereby freeing part of the RF spectrum for other uses.  There are no such advantages for 4K, so I do not see any reason for government intervention, and therefore, there is no reason for broadcasters to make another expensive switch.

 

If DirecTV shuts down their SD transmissions, I do not think they will recover enough bandwith to make a dent in the demand if everything went to 4K.  Doesn't one 4K channel require about 16 times the bandwidth of one SD channel?



#30 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:01 PM

I think we will see 4k ppv channels in the next couple years.

And that depends on the compression type and level flexkrj.

#31 OFFLINE   mika911

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:02 AM

AT&T doesn't enforce it.

 

I left AT&T DSL because they charged $10 extra per month when you'd go over 150 GB.  Cable I have no cap now (for time being).

However, my HR22 is so slow, I wouldn't even think of fussing with on demand content. 


Edited by mika911, 06 March 2014 - 02:03 AM.





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