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Dish looking to debut Internet TV service this summer -Bloomberg


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#1 OFFLINE   Athlon646464

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 07:01 AM

Dish looking to debut Internet TV service this summer -Bloomberg
 
(Reuters) - Dish Network Corp, the No. 2 U.S. satellite TV provider, is looking to debut internet TV service this summer, Bloomberg News reported on Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter.
 
However, two of the people quoted by Bloomberg said content providers have placed several conditions on Dish's service before they will agree to deals.
 
At least two of the four major broadcast networks - ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC - must be included in the service, and at least 10 of the highest-rated cable networks must also be part of the package, Bloomberg said....
 
 
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#2 OFFLINE   sregener

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 08:05 PM

Those are stupid conditions.  I already get ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC perfectly from my antenna.  Why would I need them again?



#3 OFFLINE   mwdxer

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 02:52 AM

I wonder if they want to compete with Roku and other streaming units? Dish already has Internations services available on the Roku.



#4 OFFLINE   sregener

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 08:07 AM

I wonder if they want to compete with Roku and other streaming units? Dish already has Internations services available on the Roku.

 

I haven't seen anything about Dish launching a streaming player.  I would think such an effort would be doomed to failure.  Most likely, they're going to offer a streaming service much like Netflix does - hardware neutral.  I'm expecting their streaming service would be available on Roku.



#5 OFFLINE   Paul Secic

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 09:47 AM

Those are stupid conditions.  I already get ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC perfectly from my antenna.  Why would I need them again?

More money.


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#6 OFFLINE   mwdxer

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 12:21 PM

Dish already offers streaming with Dish World. Maybe they want to extend that. The Roku is an amazing little box.



#7 OFFLINE   brett_the_bomb

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 01:23 PM

I wonder if this relates to their new wireless venture. 


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#8 OFFLINE   sregener

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 01:30 PM

More money.

 

Oh, I understand how it benefits the networks.  The issue is that bundling is precisely what has driven so many people away from the pay TV industry.  Why repeat the mistakes of the past?  Otherwise, you're just dooming the whole idea to failure before it even starts.

 

I'd pay $10/month for an ESPN streaming package.  But I'm not paying $30/month to get ESPN and a bunch of channels I don't need or don't want.



#9 OFFLINE   mwdxer

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 11:26 PM

There would be one big advantage if Dish streamed their programming. No more need for dishes and LNBFs. You would guess steam the package you would want.



#10 OFFLINE   sregener

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 03:44 AM

There would be one big advantage if Dish streamed their programming. No more need for dishes and LNBFs. You would guess steam the package you would want.

I guess I hadn't looked at it that way.  If Dish offered the exact same programming in a streaming option, there'd be no installation costs and no hardware costs.  So, in theory, no significant setup fees to create or suspend an account, ending the need for a programming commitment.  Much like pay-as-you-go cell phone service.  But would we be looking at TMobile-like pricing or Ting?



#11 OFFLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:11 AM

I'd pay $10/month for an ESPN streaming package.  But I'm not paying $30/month to get ESPN and a bunch of channels I don't need or don't want.

As long as the rest of us no longer have to subsidize the channels devoted to jocks prancing around in their undies scratching and sniffing each other.


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#12 OFFLINE   Paul Secic

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 09:40 AM

As long as the rest of us no longer have to subsidize the channels devoted to jocks prancing around in their undies scratching and sniffing each other.

AMEN! The only sport event I  watch is the Superbowl..


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#13 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 02:56 PM

The "no dish or LNB" advantage is countered by the need to have a reliable high-speed broadband.  Many people who get Dish today don't have such a ISP that could support a quality streaming TV option.  And of course there is a cost associated with that internet connection too.


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#14 OFFLINE   James Long

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:07 PM

And of course there is a cost associated with that internet connection too.


On both ends ... people may mis-assume that a fully functional IPTV system will be cheaper than satellite or cable because they do not have to pay for satellite and cable's overhead. But even going IPTV there will be costs for the hosting of the content delivery network. The customer's fee for DISH IPTV will include the costs of the CDN as well as licensing the content. (Plus the mentioned payment for the customer to maintain an Internet connection.)
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#15 OFFLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:30 PM

There's another downside I see coming.

 

For those of you who delved into BUDs when they first became popular, you remember all the free content for all over everywhere.  All you had to have was the equipment and you could watch almost anything.

 

Then some started scrambling.  Enter the companies that sold packages of several channels for a monthly fee.  More companies came in to challenge.  There was a BIG book published every month with channel guides and package offerings.

 

Then came Ku and other variations.

 

Then Dish and DirecTV showed up and basically took over from Primestar to offer cable-like service to nearly everyone whether they could get cable or not.

 

Enter the internet.

 

At first, there was a lot of video content, more or less unregulated and unrestricted if you have the connection that could handle it, sort of like the BUD days.

 

Lather, rinse, repeat ...  here we are in the transitional days maybe comparable to Ku and the early satellite channel packages.  Now they're called Netflix, Amazon, PlayOn, etc. with specialty delivery devices called  Roku, AppleTV, ChromeCast, etc.

 

You have Dish, Direct, the cable companies and a few other trying to break open the IPTV market and most, if not all of the 'free' content is either gone, or will soon be.

 

Free IPTV is going the way of free satellite TV and before long, you'll be left with not much more than what you find on FTA satellite.

 

You can't even buy real international service any more.  I'd love to be able to get real streaming TV from England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other places, but the lawyers have screwed that up.


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#16 OFFLINE   SayWhat?

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:54 PM

See whut I mean, Vern?
 
 

Hulu Begins to Block VPNs from Accessing Streaming Content
http://www.pcmag.com...,2457170,00.asp


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#17 OFFLINE   mwdxer

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 09:44 PM

There will always be free stuff on streaming. I expect more Roku services to charge for their service down the road, but of course many have already added commercials and may stay free. With the BUD, there are still hundreds of of FTA channels, but they are digital and often on KU as well as C Band. We have to change systems sometimes. Windows 95 is no longer useable so why should anything else stay the same? It is a changing World. I have seen so much in my 65 years on this earth. From the days of B&W TV with only a couple channels in cities, so digital HD streaming with thousands of channels. By the way, I still use my BUD, but not as much as I once did. One nice thing about streaming is you do not get rainfade.



#18 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 10:12 PM

On both ends ... people may mis-assume that a fully functional IPTV system will be cheaper than satellite or cable because they do not have to pay for satellite and cable's overhead. But even going IPTV there will be costs for the hosting of the content delivery network. The customer's fee for DISH IPTV will include the costs of the CDN as well as licensing the content. (Plus the mentioned payment for the customer to maintain an Internet connection.)

 

Yeah... I usually tend to think as a consumer... as to what my costs are...

 

But... from the Dish side of things... launching a satellite is expensive BUT it at least provides virtually unlimited bandwidth... by which I mean, no matter how many of us watch the satellite channels it doesn't "run low" on signal :)

 

But... they will have to continually upgrade and update to stay ahead of the bandwidth crunch as they add subscribers to the IPTV service... so whereas adding satellite customers eventually overcomes cost of doing business by exceeding the initial investment... the cost of adding IPTV customers will inevitably create the need to spend more money on that infrastructure to be able to provide the service.

 

I'm thinking it still ought to be cheaper than launching satellites into orbit... but it's hard to say.  Satellite service is one HUGE payout for the satellite followed by moderate costs to operate the uplink.  IPTV service would be substantially smaller payout to launch the service but increasing costs of operating the service as they add customers.  There could be a point at which IPTV customers (if the model succeeds) exceeds cost of a satellite-delivered service.


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#19 OFFLINE   James Long

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 12:21 AM

Yeah... I usually tend to think as a consumer... as to what my costs are...


My costs as a consumer tend to be their costs as a provider ... plus profit.

DISH does not make that much in profit. ($4.79 per subscriber per month at last report - about 6% of the average revenue per subscriber. That other satellite company makes $18.29 per subscriber per month or 17.8% of average revenue per subscriber.) If IPTV is cheaper than via satellite then perhaps customers will get a break ... or DISH will make more money.

But as you note, there are fixed costs of providing satellite service to millions of customers that do not change based on whether they have 14 million customers or one customer in each television market. Individual streams increase based on the number of active customers and active streams to multiple receivers.

While I suspect there will be a "BYOD" (bring your own device) aspect to DISH IPTV for smartphones, iProducts and possibly other devices such as Roku and PlayStation I wonder if DISH will offer satellite receivers modified for IPTV?

There are two major impacts from DISH's new service ... one is reaching people without line of sight - which is something they have been doing for years with their international channel IPTV service. And the second is reaching portable devices - which is something they have been moving into over the past few years with the companion websites and the general industry push for streamed content authenticated by having a satellite/cable subscription.

DISH has been losing out on customers who cannot get their satellite service due to LOS or other issues. This opens another door.
Welcome to DBS Talk - Let's talk about DBS! (The Digital Bit Stream)
DISH Network vs DirecTV: HD Channel List - DISH Network HD Capacity, HD Conversion and more.
DISH Network complete channel lists and lists by satellite location are in The Uplink Activity Center.
Unless otherwise noted, I speak for myself. Content is not controlled by DISH Network, DirecTV or any other company.

#20 OFFLINE   sregener

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 05:55 AM

The "no dish or LNB" advantage is countered by the need to have a reliable high-speed broadband.  Many people who get Dish today don't have such a ISP that could support a quality streaming TV option.  And of course there is a cost associated with that internet connection too.

 

If you look at the trend for young people, they don't have pay TV service.  They have high-speed Internet instead.  Dish's streaming package is an attempt to tap into that market.  But if the issue is not availability but simply that young people don't like paying high fees, and the alternatives are Amazon Prime and Netflix, Dish is going to have to keep their packages small and prices low to be competitive.  I know streaming doesn't work for everyone.






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