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DirecTV 4K UHD plans

DirecTV DTV 4k UHD

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1749 replies to this topic

#1726 ONLINE   jimmie57

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 10:18 AM

 
 
 
Did anybody notice the actual announcements were dated April 1st???  :)

Here is another article with much more detail about Perseus and the company that is producing it.

http://www.prweb.com...web12622879.htm


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#1727 OFFLINE   studechip

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 01:09 PM

 
 
 
Did anybody notice the actual announcements were dated April 1st???  :)

I noticed it said April 10th.



#1728 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 10:44 AM

I noticed it said April 10th.

The V-Nova press release is dated April 1st.

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#1729 OFFLINE   Diana C

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 03:52 PM

It is certainly possible to get UHD that small, but I question the "higher picture quality" statement. Every compression technology advance since Lempel-Ziv has been lossy (i.e. when decompressed, some information is missing). The advances from MPEG-2 to AVC to HEVC have all been based on getting smarter about what can be lost without it hurting the perceived picture quality. However, any original video compressed with HEVC will have lost information compared to one compressed with AVC which will have lost more than one compressed with MPEG-2.

If we assume a color depth of 12 bits per pixel (the largest color depth support by 4:2:2) an uncompressed 2160p/60 stream consists of almost 6 gigabits per second (5,971,968,000 to be exact). Getting that down to 7 or 8 megabits per second is a compression ratio of roughly 700:1 or a compressed stream that is 0.14% of the original. I just don't see how you can get down to that without losing enormous amounts of information.

The only way I can see it being even remotely possible is to require a LOT more processing power at the decompression end of the process. So, it may be possible, but you'll need a dedicated, high power, CPU which would add several hundred dollars to the cost of display equipment and make its use in mobile devices impractical for many years (i.e. until Moore's law gets Atom processors upto the level of an i7).

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#1730 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 11:07 PM

If we assume a color depth of 12 bits per pixel (the largest color depth support by 4:2:2) an uncompressed 2160p/60 stream consists of almost 6 gigabits per second (5,971,968,000 to be exact). Getting that down to 7 or 8 megabits per second is a compression ratio of roughly 700:1 or a compressed stream that is 0.14% of the original. I just don't see how you can get down to that without losing enormous amounts of information.

 

You sure about that math? I calculate 17.9 Gbps for 12 bit 4:4:4 4Kp60, even dropping all the way to 4:2:0 only cuts that in half. So it is even worse than what you say :)

 

I'm not quite 100% ready to write these guys off since they've at least made it sound like they have some real players working with them, but if they're for real they should be able to provide a simple downloadable viewer app that can run on a smartphone and play some sample HD at a suitably tiny bit rate as a demonstration. Claims like this in the technology world come around several times a year, only once a decade are they for real. Put up or shut up. If they want to claim "but we're not trying to market this at consumers, we're selling it to the video providers" then why the press release? Lotta red flags so far.


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#1731 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 07:46 AM

Evaluating HD on a tiny screen? I don't think that'd tell us much at all. 


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#1732 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 08:17 AM

Evaluating HD on a tiny screen? I don't think that'd tell us much at all. 

 

I was thinking in terms of an app to prove that it doesn't need much CPU (i.e. better run on older stuff like an iPhone 4 and Galaxy S2) I would assume if they did an app, they could do a version for a PC that would give you a full sized picture, but having it able to run the decoder on any PC made in the last decade plus isn't going to tell us whether it is suitable to be included in set tops.


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#1733 OFFLINE   Diana C

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 04:50 PM

You sure about that math? I calculate 17.9 Gbps for 12 bit 4:4:4 4Kp60, even dropping all the way to 4:2:0 only cuts that in half. So it is even worse than what you say :)

I'm not quite 100% ready to write these guys off since they've at least made it sound like they have some real players working with them, but if they're for real they should be able to provide a simple downloadable viewer app that can run on a smartphone and play some sample HD at a suitably tiny bit rate as a demonstration. Claims like this in the technology world come around several times a year, only once a decade are they for real. Put up or shut up. If they want to claim "but we're not trying to market this at consumers, we're selling it to the video providers" then why the press release? Lotta red flags so far.

I could be off (I did the multiplication pretty quickly using Windows Calculator...I may have forgotten one factor).

As far as the press release goes, that was probably designed to recruit investors. :)

But, math aside, it IS possible to reach these compression levels IF you have some hefty CPU power at decompression. All the existing video compression technologies have been specifically designed to be very lightweight at display time (that's how a smartphone can decode a h.265 video stream). If you have sufficient processing power at the receiver you can embed hints in the data to allow it to be reconstructed. For example, you might take a gradually shaded surface and send just the code for the base color, along with a formula that describes the shading effect. That could reduce hundreds of thousands of bits in the source into a few dozen. But as I said, it would require so much processing power that the video processor in a DVR would be considerably more powerful than the CPU. Imagine adding the cost of a 3 GHz, 4 core, CPU and a couple of gigabytes of RAM to the exisiting build cost of a DVR or STB. It would be prohibitively expensive.

Something like this might be useful for back haul tasks, as it would certainly save on satellite space, but the real challenge is getting UHD the "last mile" to the viewer.

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#1734 OFFLINE   slice1900

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 10:46 AM

Smartphones are pretty powerful now, especially if you dedicate DSP resources to a problem instead of trying to use a general purpose CPU. The iPhone 6/6S do real time HEVC video encoding for Facetime over cellular via a dedicated block on the SoC - I think only 720p but whether that is limited by the encoding complexity or the resolution of the front camera I'm not sure.

 

Not comparing that to real time 4K encoding of course, nor does it have to do the greatest job only be "better than h.264" to be a win for Apple and their customers. That it can do HEVC encoding at all shows that smartphones would be up to the task of decoding a stream that required more resources than HEVC decoding.

 

Of course, smartphone SoCs (at least in high end devices like iPhones, Galaxy S6 and so forth) cost quite a bit more than those in set tops, and that's unlikely to change as everyone goes to a client/server model and tries to further drive down the cost of the clients that will be saddled with the grunt work of decoding. Adding the block to do decoding of 'whatever' just costs silicon area and makes the SoC cost more so it becomes a cost/benefit decision. Dish might be more interested in making the Joeys more expensive if it made 4K delivery more efficient since they don't have the ample bandwidth set aside for 4K that Directv does.


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#1735 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 12:08 AM

You sure about that math? I calculate 17.9 Gbps for 12 bit 4:4:4 4Kp60, even dropping all the way to 4:2:0 only cuts that in half. So it is even worse than what you say :)

 

I'm not quite 100% ready to write these guys off since they've at least made it sound like they have some real players working with them, but if they're for real they should be able to provide a simple downloadable viewer app that can run on a smartphone and play some sample HD at a suitably tiny bit rate as a demonstration. Claims like this in the technology world come around several times a year, only once a decade are they for real. Put up or shut up. If they want to claim "but we're not trying to market this at consumers, we're selling it to the video providers" then why the press release? Lotta red flags so far.

 

They have put up. It was very well received at the NAB.

 

I was at their debut presentation at the Mandarin Oriental in Las Vegas on Saturday.

 

It was also demonstrated on the NAB Exhibt floor in 4 Booths including the Hitachi Booth where it is was used in an ultra HD ecosystem composed of Hitachi’s 4K SK-UHD4000 camera and their Data Systems servers.

 

Sky Italia is now implementing the Perseus compression technology for commercial distribution of content.

 

They claim to be able to add 1 Mb/s -2 Mb/s on top of an existing MPEG-2 signal and achieve UHD with Perseus. Claims are for a greater than 50% compression improvement over existing techniques.

 

Clearly, one could not put test equipment on the demos, but considering Sky Italia and Hitachi are actually using/demoing them, it certainly has passed their internal tests.

 

As this adds on a layer to MPEG-2 to achieve 4K UHD, I am not exactly sure where this plays out with so many plans for HEVC in place.

 

But they claim they can achieve similar results with other techniques besides MPEG-2.

 

Again, very late to the game which may make them odd man out, but it is certainly NOT vaporware.


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#1736 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 12:14 AM

That's nice, but being involved in testing doesn't mean they will deploy it, or that if they do it will be anytime soon or that it will be in all their markets instead of just a handful.

 

Right now their testing isn't costing much, and can be easily justified to management as being ready for 4K. When it comes time to actually do it, and they either need a second broadcast license and second transmitter in every market, or they must shut down their existing broadcasts and cut off any viewer who doesn't have ATSC 3.0 equipment. Management may not be so eager to green light either plan.

 

I have a feeling the broadcasters will lobby the FCC to give away ATSC 3.0 set tops, and we won't see any movement on 4K broadcasts while they try to make that happen. There will be further delays from lawsuits filed by people who have marginal reception today who will be unable to receive the ATSC 3.0 broadcasts due to the required 10 db greater SNR to provide the increased bit rate.

 

You clearly are unaware of Sinclair's testing, probably the most advanced of ANY Television Group.

 

They fought and fought up through ~2005 not to go with 8VSB because of the issues we all know to well. Mobile HDTV and tiny indoor antennas would be mainstream today if the FCC had listened to them 10+ years ago.

 

Broadcasters and the FCC know this in retrospect.

 

Many might not like their Corporate Political stance, but Sinclair will be on the technological forefront and your dismissal of them is very naive, showing you out of the loop in that area.

 

 

EDIT: By the way, Broadcasters have no illusion of the FCC doing another ill fated ATSC 3.0 Set top giveaway. That, btw, was paid for the money the FCC made by taking back channels and selling off the frequencies. In the forthcoming auction, $1.8B is going to pay stations who remain on the air to move/repack the spectrum.

 

In all likelihood, the move to ATSC 3.0 will be done the day the stations move to their new "home".


Edited by SomeRandomIdiot, Yesterday, 12:35 AM.

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#1737 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 12:24 AM

I think we, and DirecTV, should be thinking more about HDR than 4K, now.  Samsung, LG, and Sony premium sets all advertise HDR, the UHD Blu-ray players when they get here early next year will be HDR capable, an extension to HDMI 2.0 for HDR extensions was just approved a few days ago (http://www.hdmi.org/...e.aspx?prid=138) .  The world keeps changing faster.

 

I have had a 2014 Samsung 4K set (50HU8550) for several months now, and I like it okay.  But the change in picture quality going from 2K to 4K is rather subtle -- some people claim not to even notice it at normal viewing distances.  I've had a 2015 Samsung 4K HDR-capable set (65JS9000) for just a few days, and the improvement in picture quality for DirecTV 1080i channels is dramatic, in my opinion.  True HDR will have expanded brightness range in the video source as well as display devices, and I haven't seen that yet, but even just the faked HDR that I have seen so far is very good.

 

 

Where to start on this one....
 
As i said a long time ago, I have been a fan of Dolby Vision HDR since I first saw it in early 2009. I am amazed it has taken this long for it to be seriously considered.
 
That said, what you want will not happen for multiple reasons.
 
First, there are 4 different HDR formats (and several additional homebrewed systems TVs have put together) which the market is considering right now. BBC, Dolby Vision, Philips, Technicolor, 
 
For the most part, these formats are INCOMPATIBLE (Think competing 3D Standards/Glasses). 
 
Dolby Vision HDR may already be the winner though, as in the last 90 days, Netflix, Amazon, Vudu and Warner Brothers announced they will support Dolby Vision HDR. Brands supporting Dolby Vision are Hisen, Philips, Sharp, TCL and Vizio with their just announced Reference line 65" and 120" series. However, there are NO Dolby Vision HDR UHD actually available for purchase today in the USA. The Vizio will most likely be ther first.
 
Dolby Vision wants TVs to do 1000+ NITS (really at least to 1400-1600 NITS) and the format can actually do 4000 NITS (1 NIT = 0.29 FL / 100 NITS = 29.18 FL / 1000 NITS = 291.86). This would give Dolby Vision a Contrast Ratio of roughly 21 Million :1.
 
For comparison, most HDTV used to have roughly 100 NITS. Over the past several years, the normal HDTV has 400 NITS, although a few jumped to roughly 750 NITS over the past 9-12 months.
 
However, the Vizio Reference will only do 800 NIT - not even 1000 NIT, much less 1400-1600 (or even 4000 NIT). It appears the first generation, none of which are on the market, will probably not go past 1000 NIT either, meaning the full scope of Dolby Vision HDR will not be able to be seen in your home even in at least the next 12+ months.
 
Now, further confuse things, Netflix announced at CES that they would work with Sony and LG to stream HDR content. However, the LG UHD and Sony UHD (X930C/X940C) shown at CES that demonstrated "HDR" are not Dolby Vision HDR, but their homebrewed HDR scheme. 
 
There has been no clarification if Netflix will support the homebrewed Sony and LG HDR, or if they will infact force Sony and LG to adopt Dolby Vision for HDR viewing, a change from their CES models just 100 days ago.
 
To confuse things even more, OLED cannot produce the brightness that LCDs can. In the LG OLED that was demo'd at a private suite at the Bellagio (not the CES floor), they were able to increase the OLED from 500 NITS to 800 NITS, but as explained above, Dolby Vision wants roughly twice that as a minimum.
 
Even though Philips says they are supporting Dolby Vision, they only demoed their "LCD Laser" HDR system at CES.
 
Panasonic was calling their homebrew system "Dynamic Range Remaster" in it's CX850 series.
 
And Samsung has put their homebrewed HDR into their SUHD series such as the JS9500 while not calling it HDR, although it has double the brightness of a typical LCD at around 1000 NIT (But of course cannot produce 0 NIT as an OLED can). 
 
Sony's X940C has their homebrewed "X-tended Dynamic Rango Pro" while the X930C has their homebrewed "X-tended Dynamic Range".
 
And as for Sharp and real "Dolby Vision", Sharp is essentially in Bankruptcy -only announcing a $2 Billion Bailout 48 hours ago - and part of that involves shutting down a large portion of the North American Television Operation - so who knows if we EVER see a Sharp Dolby Vision set in the USA?
 
What's the word.....Clusterf.....
 
Think of the "homebrewed" HDR systems that Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, et al are using are basically the Samsung producing Quasi-3D on their sets from 2D programming several years ago.
 
So besides the real HDR formats being incompatible,  they are not BACKWARDS COMPATIBLE - Dolby Vision encoded content is NOT viewable on non-Dolby Vision Systems. At the very least, it would look VERY flat and bland.
 
If you are still actually reading this, this leaves Samsung out alone on an island. HDR is supposed to be available through their M-GO secure locker system - and it most likely will.
 
So to review thus far....
 
There are NO Dolby Vision HDR Monitors actually available on the market in the USA today.
 
There IS a Samsung available (obviously), but it is off on its own with no support except for their own streaming.
 
Clearly, there are LESS HDR Monitors in Living Rooms today than UHD Sets. In fact, less than 1% than of the UHDs on the market today have "simulated" HDR and 0% have one of the 4 "real" HDR techniques.
 
And we have yet to talk the added payload. At minimum, HDR will add 10% to the payload - but in reality adds 25%-30% to the payload (bitrate/size).
 
As thus, a full UHD at 100/120fps and Dolby Vision HDR et al will need at MINIMUM 25Mbps.
 
And circling back around...
 
Between all that and incompatibility, DirecTV has no reason to do 1080 HDR. Only the newer UHD sets will have HDR - and Samsung, the only way to watch DirecTV UHD, is incompatible with the system that Netflix, Vudu, Amazon et al look to now behind.
 
If DirecTV is going to do it, they might as well go UHD with Dolby Vision when they have an actual IRD that can output the proper format.
 
While I agree that the homebrew systems that Samsung, Panasonic and Sony have put together in the interim look nice, there is no reason for DirecTV to enter a dead-end technology and further confuse consumers - especially with 1080 HDR.

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#1738 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 12:27 AM

Everyone should read this that has any interest in 4K.

 

http://www.residenti...=90&EntryId=970

 

And anyone who was critical of 3D clearly never saw the Masters in 3D.


Edited by SomeRandomIdiot, Yesterday, 12:36 AM.

4 Warning Points and Climbing.....

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And The Hits just Keep On Coming!


#1739 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted Yesterday, 10:20 AM

Everyone should read this that has any interest in 4K.

 

http://www.residenti...=90&EntryId=970

 

And anyone who was critical of 3D clearly never saw the Masters in 3D.

 

Read it and was happy to see that the writer saw the same thing I did when I was doing comparisons.  

 

Rich



#1740 OFFLINE   Rich

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Posted Yesterday, 10:22 AM

 

Where to start on this one....
 
As i said a long time ago, I have been a fan of Dolby Vision HDR since I first saw it in early 2009. I am amazed it has taken this long for it to be seriously considered.
 
That said, what you want will not happen for multiple reasons.
 
First, there are 4 different HDR formats (and several additional homebrewed systems TVs have put together) which the market is considering right now. BBC, Dolby Vision, Philips, Technicolor, 
 
For the most part, these formats are INCOMPATIBLE (Think competing 3D Standards/Glasses). 
 
Dolby Vision HDR may already be the winner though, as in the last 90 days, Netflix, Amazon, Vudu and Warner Brothers announced they will support Dolby Vision HDR. Brands supporting Dolby Vision are Hisen, Philips, Sharp, TCL and Vizio with their just announced Reference line 65" and 120" series. However, there are NO Dolby Vision HDR UHD actually available for purchase today in the USA. The Vizio will most likely be ther first.
 
Dolby Vision wants TVs to do 1000+ NITS (really at least to 1400-1600 NITS) and the format can actually do 4000 NITS (1 NIT = 0.29 FL / 100 NITS = 29.18 FL / 1000 NITS = 291.86). This would give Dolby Vision a Contrast Ratio of roughly 21 Million :1.
 
For comparison, most HDTV used to have roughly 100 NITS. Over the past several years, the normal HDTV has 400 NITS, although a few jumped to roughly 750 NITS over the past 9-12 months.
 
However, the Vizio Reference will only do 800 NIT - not even 1000 NIT, much less 1400-1600 (or even 4000 NIT). It appears the first generation, none of which are on the market, will probably not go past 1000 NIT either, meaning the full scope of Dolby Vision HDR will not be able to be seen in your home even in at least the next 12+ months.
 
Now, further confuse things, Netflix announced at CES that they would work with Sony and LG to stream HDR content. However, the LG UHD and Sony UHD (X930C/X940C) shown at CES that demonstrated "HDR" are not Dolby Vision HDR, but their homebrewed HDR scheme. 
 
There has been no clarification if Netflix will support the homebrewed Sony and LG HDR, or if they will infact force Sony and LG to adopt Dolby Vision for HDR viewing, a change from their CES models just 100 days ago.
 
To confuse things even more, OLED cannot produce the brightness that LCDs can. In the LG OLED that was demo'd at a private suite at the Bellagio (not the CES floor), they were able to increase the OLED from 500 NITS to 800 NITS, but as explained above, Dolby Vision wants roughly twice that as a minimum.
 
Even though Philips says they are supporting Dolby Vision, they only demoed their "LCD Laser" HDR system at CES.
 
Panasonic was calling their homebrew system "Dynamic Range Remaster" in it's CX850 series.
 
And Samsung has put their homebrewed HDR into their SUHD series such as the JS9500 while not calling it HDR, although it has double the brightness of a typical LCD at around 1000 NIT (But of course cannot produce 0 NIT as an OLED can). 
 
Sony's X940C has their homebrewed "X-tended Dynamic Rango Pro" while the X930C has their homebrewed "X-tended Dynamic Range".
 
And as for Sharp and real "Dolby Vision", Sharp is essentially in Bankruptcy -only announcing a $2 Billion Bailout 48 hours ago - and part of that involves shutting down a large portion of the North American Television Operation - so who knows if we EVER see a Sharp Dolby Vision set in the USA?
 
What's the word.....Clusterf.....
 
Think of the "homebrewed" HDR systems that Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, et al are using are basically the Samsung producing Quasi-3D on their sets from 2D programming several years ago.
 
So besides the real HDR formats being incompatible,  they are not BACKWARDS COMPATIBLE - Dolby Vision encoded content is NOT viewable on non-Dolby Vision Systems. At the very least, it would look VERY flat and bland.
 
If you are still actually reading this, this leaves Samsung out alone on an island. HDR is supposed to be available through their M-GO secure locker system - and it most likely will.
 
So to review thus far....
 
There are NO Dolby Vision HDR Monitors actually available on the market in the USA today.
 
There IS a Samsung available (obviously), but it is off on its own with no support except for their own streaming.
 
Clearly, there are LESS HDR Monitors in Living Rooms today than UHD Sets. In fact, less than 1% than of the UHDs on the market today have "simulated" HDR and 0% have one of the 4 "real" HDR techniques.
 
And we have yet to talk the added payload. At minimum, HDR will add 10% to the payload - but in reality adds 25%-30% to the payload (bitrate/size).
 
As thus, a full UHD at 100/120fps and Dolby Vision HDR et al will need at MINIMUM 25Mbps.
 
And circling back around...
 
Between all that and incompatibility, DirecTV has no reason to do 1080 HDR. Only the newer UHD sets will have HDR - and Samsung, the only way to watch DirecTV UHD, is incompatible with the system that Netflix, Vudu, Amazon et al look to now behind.
 
If DirecTV is going to do it, they might as well go UHD with Dolby Vision when they have an actual IRD that can output the proper format.
 
While I agree that the homebrew systems that Samsung, Panasonic and Sony have put together in the interim look nice, there is no reason for DirecTV to enter a dead-end technology and further confuse consumers - especially with 1080 HDR.

 

 

So, for the sake of brevity (and my sanity), this is just like the fiasco with the BD operating systems?  Did I boil that down correctly?

 

Rich



#1741 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 01:41 PM

So, for the sake of brevity (and my sanity), this is just like the fiasco with the BD operating systems?  Did I boil that down correctly?
 
Rich


In a nutshell, it is what every new format goes through.

The problem is EVERYONE is using or inferring the term HDR, when unlike Blu-Ray and HD-DVD, no one used one technology as a term (Xerox) for both of them, as is being done with HDR.

I original used the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray as the example in line 5, but the better is example is 3D, where Mitsubishi/Samsung 3D glasses would not work with Panasonic etc.

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#1742 OFFLINE   GregLee

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Posted Yesterday, 01:44 PM

 

However, the Vizio Reference will only do 800 NIT - not even 1000 NIT, much less 1400-1600 (or even 4000 NIT). It appears the first generation, none of which are on the market, will probably not go past 1000 NIT either, meaning the full scope of Dolby Vision HDR will not be able to be seen in your home even in at least the next 12+ months.

 

 

It's not all about the nits.  A year or so ago, Dolby was saying that the limited brightness of current displays was not really a problem, and that Dolby Vision could do a good job on current devices.  I think the bit depth of current display panels is a bigger difficulty.  The current TVs that have some claim to be HDR capable have 10 bit panels, but Dolby has said they want at least 12 bit color depth.

 

I don't think we know that Samsung has foreclosed Dolby Vision for their current sets.  Perhaps they've just chosen the SMPTE HDR system as an expedient to be first to market with TVs that can display some sort of HDR source.  They might be able to do Dolby Vision on their current sets, with a system software update, or at worst a new $500 or so One Connect Box.


Greg

#1743 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 01:46 PM

The V-Nova press release is dated April 1st.


V-Nova PERSEUS was award a NewBay Publishing / TV Technology's 2015 NAB Best of Show Award.

If you think it is an April Fool's joke, the joke is on you.

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#1744 OFFLINE   Diana C

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Posted Yesterday, 01:52 PM

...They claim to be able to add 1 Mb/s -2 Mb/s on top of an existing MPEG-2 signal and achieve UHD with Perseus. Claims are for a greater than 50% compression improvement over existing techniques...

 

Interesting...that would seem to indicate that it IS working outside of the standard raster processing that has been the basis of all video compression for decades. There were a bunch of proposals early in the MPEG-4 design about using differential and/or vector analysis to achieve better quality over comparable bandwidth, but they were rejected because of the radically greater decoding load (although "sprites" did make it into the spec, they were not really useful for general video use).  Processing power has gotten a lot cheaper since then, obviously.

 

Maybe these guys should change their name to "Pied Piper."   :)  (Kudos to those who get THAT reference!)


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#1745 OFFLINE   GregLee

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Posted Yesterday, 01:57 PM

Everyone should read this that has any interest in 4K.

 

http://www.residenti...=90&EntryId=970

 

 

Yes, I watched several hours of the Masters on DirecTV, using my new Samsung JS9000.  It looked great.  Samsung has made strides in their upconversion to 4K -- the resolution looked to me like first rate 1080p, quite a bit better than I ever saw on DirecTV with my old 2013 plasma TV.  Good brightness, too, of course, but also very good color.  The next generation of TVs will have better resolution (4K), better brightness (HDR), and better colors (WCG+HDR).  Probably better motion display, too.


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#1746 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 01:59 PM

It's not all about the nits.  A year or so ago, Dolby was saying that the limited brightness of current displays was not really a problem, and that Dolby Vision could do a good job on current devices.  I think the bit depth of current display panels is a bigger difficulty.  The current TVs that have some claim to be HDR capable have 10 bit panels, but Dolby has said they want at least 12 bit color depth.

Actually, it is about the NITS to get the contrast ratio.

 

NITS-35.JPG


Edited by SomeRandomIdiot, Yesterday, 02:00 PM.

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#1747 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 06:48 PM

Really too bad the Vizio Reference Series does not currently work within the DirecTV UHD framework

 

 

 

VIZIO Reference Series Redefines Picture and Audio Quality

 

http://www.residenti...-quality-/86961

 

 

 

Vizio HDR Display at NAB, Teamed with DolbyVision

http://www.avnetwork...lbyvision/94889


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#1748 OFFLINE   SomeRandomIdiot

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Posted Yesterday, 06:49 PM

The first Linear 4K/UHD channel....

 

Dutch media company Bravia launches world's first 4K/Ultra HD channel

 

http://www.fiercecab...nnel/2015-04-17


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#1749 OFFLINE   Drucifer

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Posted Yesterday, 08:09 PM

Really too bad the Vizio Reference Series does not currently work within the DirecTV UHD framework

 

 

 

VIZIO Reference Series Redefines Picture and Audio Quality

 

http://www.residenti...-quality-/86961

 

 

 

Vizio HDR Display at NAB, Teamed with DolbyVision

http://www.avnetwork...lbyvision/94889

 

That's why everyone purchasing an UHD set should wait until every company gets their specs under the UHD Alliance umbrella.


Edited by Drucifer, Yesterday, 08:10 PM.

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#1750 OFFLINE   Laxguy

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Posted Yesterday, 09:41 PM

Every company? That might be forever.....


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