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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Wiring house for DISH maybe DIRECTV..dual coax??

dual coax DishNetwork DirecTV

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13 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   pitterpat

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 12:40 PM

I will be wiring my house soon for DishNetwork (maybe DirectV but like Dish better).  I am going to use RG6, this is a one story 1950's house with an open ceiling in the basement, so I won't have to go through the attic.  I am wondering is there any scenario where I would need the Dual coax cable?  When I got Dish in my other house the installer put in Dual coax but that was in like 2004.

 

Thanks in advance.



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#2 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 01:00 PM

For over the air possible. It never hurts to run extra wire. I sure would. I'd run cat6 to all the spots too just in case.

#3 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 01:01 PM

We gave given advice in other threads regarding new home construction... but it applies whenever you have relatively easy access to run cables.  Given that the cost of the cable itself is relatively cheap... and the "cost" is in the labor of running the coax...  I always recommend running several to any room you are considering running one.

 

Most of the modern Dish receivers will only need one run of coax to each room.  That run should go back to a central location where the Dish outside (or switch connected to the dish) can be connected.

 

So you definitely need one run to any room.  I recommend a 2nd run for possible OTA in case you decide to put up an outdoor (or attic) antenna and want OTA in multiple locations in the home.  I also would recommend a 3rd run "just because" while you are doing the work, running 3 cables is only marginally more difficult than running 2.

 

Anything beyond that is gravy.  If it were me, and I was running cables of any kind... I would also run some wiring for possible home-network-ethernet as well... again, just because it is easier to run multiple things at the same time.

 

Note... inkahauts posted the same advice more succinctly as I was typing this one!


-- Respect the S.H.I.E.L.D.


#4 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 01:24 PM

Actually, I'd also run phone lines to all the spots to. I like my caller id on screen. ;)

#5 OFFLINE   pitterpat

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 03:06 PM

We gave given advice in other threads regarding new home construction... but it applies whenever you have relatively easy access to run cables.  Given that the cost of the cable itself is relatively cheap... and the "cost" is in the labor of running the coax...  I always recommend running several to any room you are considering running one.

 

Most of the modern Dish receivers will only need one run of coax to each room.  That run should go back to a central location where the Dish outside (or switch connected to the dish) can be connected.

 

So you definitely need one run to any room.  I recommend a 2nd run for possible OTA in case you decide to put up an outdoor (or attic) antenna and want OTA in multiple locations in the home.  I also would recommend a 3rd run "just because" while you are doing the work, running 3 cables is only marginally more difficult than running 2.

 

Anything beyond that is gravy.  If it were me, and I was running cables of any kind... I would also run some wiring for possible home-network-ethernet as well... again, just because it is easier to run multiple things at the same time.

 

Note... inkahauts posted the same advice more succinctly as I was typing this one!

 

 

When I type "Dual coax" what I really meant was the type of coax is already 2 cables fused together like this :), not really the number of drops (think that's what they call it?)

$_12.JPG



#6 OFFLINE   pitterpat

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 03:08 PM

Also, is there any book or tutorial that I could use to guide me in:

1. Location of box

2. What I might want to do as in coax, ethernet, maybe what type of lan, patch cords etc?

 

Thank!



#7 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:25 PM

Ok, you are asking a bit to vague a question to be honest.

Cable itself, coax should be solid copper core shielded and so forth. I'd use directvs rated cable from solid signal, works great for anyone and everything.

As for Ethernet, I buy the bulk from mono price, cat6 line. It's real fun putting it together though, so be ware of that part,it's a learning experience in tediousness...

Always do home runs to a central point in the home. If you can, make that central point the center of the house. If not, then at least make sure you run one Ethernet cord to a fairly centrally located point in your home, so you could put a wireless access point there and possibly have good coverage all around the entire house with it. You will want your router and modem where all the runs end. Run yourself coax to that point as well, you never know when you might go with a wireless client someday.

As for box location, what exactly do you mean? Can you paint us a picture of your home?

#8 ONLINE   Rduce

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 03:40 AM

Ok, you are asking a bit to vague a question to be honest.

Cable itself, coax should be solid copper core shielded and so forth. I'd use directvs rated cable from solid signal, works great for anyone and everything.

As for Ethernet, I buy the bulk from mono price, cat6 line. It's real fun putting it together though, so be ware of that part,it's a learning experience in tediousness...

Always do home runs to a central point in the home. If you can, make that central point the center of the house. If not, then at least make sure you run one Ethernet cord to a fairly centrally located point in your home, so you could put a wireless access point there and possibly have good coverage all around the entire house with it. You will want your router and modem where all the runs end. Run yourself coax to that point as well, you never know when you might go with a wireless client someday.

As for box location, what exactly do you mean? Can you paint us a picture of your home?

 That is odd. I just had a Dish Tech out a week ago and he told me that they do not use solid copper cable. He said the Hopper Systems do not like solid copper cable...


Edited by Rduce, 04 August 2014 - 03:40 AM.


#9 OFFLINE   david_jr

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 07:49 AM

Funny, I have solid copper core coax and neither of my Hoppers has ever complained.



#10 OFFLINE   Jim5506

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 10:44 AM

I would not use dual coaxial cable, it makes replacing one or the other problematic.

 

Just run 2 separate coaxial cables to each location and label ALL of the ends.


Tuners: Hopper 2000; Hopper w/Sling; 3 Joeys; Samsung SIR-T351; Accurian 6000;2 X HD TiVo; 2 X TiVo Series 2 Stand alone; Panasonic Showstopper 2000
Dish 1000.2 @ 110, 119, 129; dish 500 @ 61.5
Antennas - CM4228; RS U75-R; coathanger; Funke PSP.1922 (stillin the box); paperclip
Displays: Sony VPH D50Q with HD Fury HDMI input; Hitachi 57F59; Sony Bravia LCD;Sanyo 32" LCD; Panasonic 42" plasma
Sony 80GB PS3; Toshiba HD-DVD

Give me a Finco colinear array and I'll rule the world - HA-HA-HA-HA!

#11 OFFLINE   DoyleS

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 11:41 AM

Take a look at the structured Wiring Panels on Smarthome.

http://www.smarthome.../v/1P3/nav.aspx

This will give you a good idea of what you will need and how to set it up. 

All wiring goes to the structured panel.  You have power available there so that any Ethernet switches or other devices that require power can be connected.

Clearly label and number each cable.  Use the proper boxes and jumper panels at the central location and wall connectors in each room. 

If unsure as to the location in a specific room, drop multiple locations to that room.  If routers and other items will be in an office then make sure you have multiple drops in that office.

Go the extra mile to do it right and you will not regret it. 

For instance, your router may be located in an office and you send a connection from that router to the central panel from the office.  Then you have a Gigabit Ethernet switch located in the panel that in turn distributes that Ethernet connection to each room via the patch panel. 


Edited by DoyleS, 04 August 2014 - 11:44 AM.

Receivers= 722K, 722, 211K,
Dishes=Dish1000.2
Sling Adapter

#12 OFFLINE   Stewart Vernon

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 01:03 PM

I would not use dual coaxial cable, it makes replacing one or the other problematic.

 

Just run 2 separate coaxial cables to each location and label ALL of the ends.

 

Agreed.  Was just about to post that.  It's cool when you're running it and all... but if one cable develops a problem, you have to replace them both.  Makes everything potentially more difficult later.  Unless you are talking very short runs (like maybe from outside the house to a junction box just inside the wall on the other side) I wouldn't run dual coax either.

 

Regarding inkahauts "run all cables to a central location" suggestion. I modify that a bit for myself... I don't necessarily run to a central location within the home... I run to a common location. A good place for a common location is wherever your power comes into the home.  It's a place where you already have cables coming in from outside, and you should have a good grounding point there as well.  I typically make my "central" location as close to where the utilities come into the home as I can.


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#13 OFFLINE   Papa J

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 09:44 PM

I visited a local Dish installation center today and was told Dish does not install solid core copper. There coax core is steel clad in copper. I assume this is to save money. I was told the signal only travels in a spiral motion around the outside on the coper cladding.

#14 OFFLINE   Jim5506

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 08:16 AM

Solid copper is only needed where you need ample current to operate the lnbs, ie, long runs.

 

The current, even with electricity does run on the surface, thus power companies use braided wire for more surface area.


Tuners: Hopper 2000; Hopper w/Sling; 3 Joeys; Samsung SIR-T351; Accurian 6000;2 X HD TiVo; 2 X TiVo Series 2 Stand alone; Panasonic Showstopper 2000
Dish 1000.2 @ 110, 119, 129; dish 500 @ 61.5
Antennas - CM4228; RS U75-R; coathanger; Funke PSP.1922 (stillin the box); paperclip
Displays: Sony VPH D50Q with HD Fury HDMI input; Hitachi 57F59; Sony Bravia LCD;Sanyo 32" LCD; Panasonic 42" plasma
Sony 80GB PS3; Toshiba HD-DVD

Give me a Finco colinear array and I'll rule the world - HA-HA-HA-HA!





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