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Guest Message by DevFuse

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When are HDTVs going down in price?


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25 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   Paul Secic

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 03:37 PM

Prices have already dropped big time and will drop some more but there is a low point for everything before you will see more in the way of improvement in the product instead of lowering of the prices. I do not expect the prices to drop much less if any less than what the SD televisions were the same size and until the SD television that same size is phased out and only HD available.

Until they stop making SD CRTS allltogether HD sets will remain high, and average joe won't bother.

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#22 OFFLINE   Jacob S

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 07:55 PM

The companies do not have an incentive to make the digital televisions for a higher price vs. an analog television for a lower price which may generate more sales.

#23 OFFLINE   Cholly

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Posted 22 May 2005 - 02:40 PM

Paul -- simple fact of life: HDTV receivers cost more to make, even in huge quantities, especially if an ATSC tuner is included. The FCC is being very slow in mandating ATSC tuners in all TV's. So yes, there is a fairly sizable difference in price between NTSC only receivers and both "HD Ready" sets and HD sets.
For the present, the broadcasters and the receiver manufacturers share the blame for the lack of HD content and the apparent high price of HD receivers.

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#24 OFFLINE   Larry Caldwell

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Posted 22 May 2005 - 09:21 PM

Until they stop making SD CRTS allltogether HD sets will remain high, and average joe won't bother.


If you adjust for inflation, HD sets cost less than color sets cost when they were introduced. B&W sets were compatible with color broadcast, so adoption was very slow. I was lower on the income scale back then, so didn't buy my first color set until about 18 years after color broadcast started. At that, it was a 19" set that cost over $800 in today's dollars.

#25 OFFLINE   RLMesq

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 06:34 PM

If you adjust for inflation, HD sets cost less than color sets cost when they were introduced. B&W sets were compatible with color broadcast, so adoption was very slow. I was lower on the income scale back then, so didn't buy my first color set until about 18 years after color broadcast started. At that, it was a 19" set that cost over $800 in today's dollars.


I sold TVs and VCRs at a superstore during the Christmas season in 1984. The top of the line Panasonic VCR, with newly-released H-Fi sound, sold for about $800. (Stereo broadcast tuners didn't come out until the following year.) There was also a gee-whiz 20" Toshiba CRT set with PIP with a list price of $1200.

Those prices sound pretty outrageous now, even without adjusting for inflation!

#26 OFFLINE   Jacob S

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 03:55 PM

Electronics go down in price over a period of time to where they should be, at an affordable price for the average American. This reminds me of the discussion about gas prices where it is cheaper now than then because it did not inflate like other goods have. Perhaps another way of looking at it just like electronics is that the price then was too high and that it is at a more affordable reasonable cost now.




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