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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Plasma screen care, help


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8 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   MrFooks

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 07:56 PM

I bought a Panasonic HD Plasma two weeks ago and my wife wiped the screen with a swiffer cloth to remove the dust.
It left some marks in the screen that I thought windex would clear.
It seems to have made it ten times worse. Any ideas on how to get the glass back to pristine condition?
Thanks

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#2 OFFLINE   JohnGfun

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 08:37 PM

I bought a Panasonic HD Plasma two weeks ago and my wife wiped the screen with a swiffer cloth to remove the dust.
It left some marks in the screen that I thought windex would clear.
It seems to have made it ten times worse. Any ideas on how to get the glass back to pristine condition?
Thanks

Hmmmmm...A swiffer pad should not do that. That is strange.

#3 OFFLINE   MrFooks

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 08:58 PM

I've been doing some research and it would seem that these screens are caoted with some kind of coating. I don't know what it is or what it does.
Seems to me there should have been some kind of warning label about possible damage to the glass and it's coating.
There is a mention of it though buried in the owners manual.

#4 OFFLINE   JohnGfun

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 10:08 PM

I've been doing some research and it would seem that these screens are caoted with some kind of coating. I don't know what it is or what it does.
Seems to me there should have been some kind of warning label about possible damage to the glass and it's coating.
There is a mention of it though buried in the owners manual.

I've always wiped mine with swiffer pads...Are they just regular Swiffer Pads or the scented kind...They WILL leave streaks!

#5 OFFLINE   Nick

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 08:36 AM

Unlike CRT-based direct-view tv sets, most, if not all of the 'flat-panel type display screens are not made of tempered glass, but usually some softer, plastic-like material.

It's always best to follow mfr's instructions for screen care, even if that wisdom is buried deep in the user manual. It just does not make sense for you to invest hundreds or thousands of dollars to get the best picture quality possible only to mess up the screen by using artificial Swiffer-type products composed of thousands of hard-plastic fibers , or indiscriminately spraying-on of cleaning solutions such as Windex or other such harsh, chemical-based products.

Personally, I use a clean dry soft cotton cloth to carefull dust my 53" lenticular screen. The cotton fibers of the cotton cloth are softer and, if clean, will not scratch the plastic surface of the screen. Periodically I use the same cloth, cleaned and slightly dampened with filtered water, with just a drop of mild dishwashing liquid mixed in as a surfactant emulsifier. This cloth gets laundered with my whites and is not used for general cleaning.

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#6 OFFLINE   Bogy

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 10:51 AM

I use a microfiber cloth, designed for cleaning plastic lenses, along with the cleaning fluid for the same purpose.

#7 OFFLINE   KingLoop

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Posted 31 May 2005 - 08:11 AM

I use a microfiber cloth, designed for cleaning plastic lenses, along with the cleaning fluid for the same purpose.

Exactly, When it comes to a more costly investment it never makes sense to try to cut corners on cost of accessories.
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#8 OFFLINE   olgeezer

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 04:10 PM

And squirt the microfabric, not the screen with the lens cleaner. As these screens don't attract dust, like CRTs, as long as there are no rug rats or smokers in the house, this may be done as little as once a year and sometimes less.

#9 OFFLINE   ntexasdude

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 07:09 PM

I have told my crew (bowling ball and rugrats) to NEVER but NEVER touch my lcd computer monitor under penealty of severe beatings!!!! No reason why human fingers should ever touch my various monitor screens! ;)
My time walkin' the blue globe is sparse. Hopefully, see ya'll on the flipside.




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