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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Installer comin Wed!! Question!!


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7 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   patblue03

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 11:16 AM

Hey guys,
I have had DirecTV forever, but had to switch to cable for a while and now i'm comin back! I had a question though. I'm getting the 5LNB dish with the new mpeg-4 hd receiver. I have a 50" SXRD Sony, and a top of the line audioquest HDMI cable with a monster HTS-5100 power center. I'm trying to keep the picture quality at its best. Will it make a big difference if I run an upgraded coax cable straight from the dish to the box. (it's only about a 30 ft run).

What are some other pointers to get the best possible picture :)

Thanks!

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#2 OFFLINE   Earl Bonovich

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 11:31 AM

Won't make a difference.... but it won't hurt either.

It is a digital signal... either you "get it" or you don't "get it"...
It could imrove the signal strength so you won't get signal drops... but if you already have an RG-6 cable there... you probably won't see a difference.

And then there is that HDMI cable you have...
"Top Of the Line" again it is a digital signal... so you may have "marginal" (I mean VERY marginal) improvement in PQ because of it... but nothing worth spending $$$ over.

The best way to ensure you get the best picture possible....
Spend the money to have your TV/AUDIO professionally callibrated.
Earl - Gotta Love Karma

DIRECTV employee since April 2008.
All comments are my own. Unless specifically stated, my views do NOT represent the views of DIRECTV

#3 OFFLINE   HockeyKat

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 11:33 AM

In my completely uneducated taking a wild guess opinion, I'd say no, it won't make a difference. I have the same tv (LOVE it!!!), and a Denon receiver that all our components run through. All the feeds go from the dish (AT9) to a multiswitch before being connected to the receivers themselves and the picture still looks great.

#4 OFFLINE   scott T

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 12:01 PM

You have two options for cabling. RG6 or RG6 quad shielded. The only reason you would need quad is if your cable runs are near a lot of florescent lights. If there is any improvement, it will only be in your signal strength. And then the improvement may only be 1-2%.

As far as picture quality. That’s all up to your receiver and TV. Digital is nothing more that 1 and 0. They’re on or off. You either have them or you don’t.
Scott T

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#5 OFFLINE   carl6

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 06:22 PM

You have two options for cabling. RG6 or RG6 quad shielded.


Also RG6 with solid copper center conductor. Available in both regular and quad shield. This is recommended for use with the new AT9 dish. Regular RG6 (including quad) has a copper clad steel center conductor.

Difference in using solid copper is less DC voltage resistance for providing power out to the dish LNB assemblies. Doesn't really make any difference in the amount of signal you get back from the dish.

Carl

#6 OFFLINE   patblue03

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:31 AM

The installer is here. One more question. Is it proper to tip the guy if they are going to be putting up the new dish? It seems like it will tak about 2-3 hrs for the total job. Do they expect tips and if so how much?
Thanks!

Pat
Sony 50" SXRD TV :lol:
Energy 5.1 :grin:
XBOX 360 ;)
Yamaha Receiver :nono:
Monster Power HTS-5100 :hurah:
H20 Directv HD Receiver :)
Cables by Audioquest :D

#7 OFFLINE   Earl Bonovich

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:34 AM

You can Tip if you want...

I typically offer them a cold cola or something for the ride to their next job.
Earl - Gotta Love Karma

DIRECTV employee since April 2008.
All comments are my own. Unless specifically stated, my views do NOT represent the views of DIRECTV

#8 OFFLINE   Cap'n Preshoot

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 06:29 PM

I agree. Tipping is purely optional and they do not expect it except possibly in the very upscale neighborhoods. If it's DirectTech, based on Houston figures the guy is paid by the job, not by the hour and makes approx $45 per AT9 installed with a schedule goal of 4 systems per day. His uniform and "official" DirecTV truck are furnished to him and he has commuting use of it (meaning he gets to take it home at night). For concealed wiring (fished walls) the tech makes $50 per drop. The techs work from home and get their jobs via the Internet. They have to provide their own hand tools; ladders, safety equipment and specialized test equipment (the Sat alignment meter) and all consumables (cable, connectors, etc) are furnished. They work an average 10 hrs a day and 6 days a week. The 7th day is mandatory time off. I didn't ask about benefits, but the guy told me he gets a flat $30 monthly discount on his own Sat service. Like the rest of us he has to pay for everything else. For service calls (repairs) he makes a flat $15 per job.

So no, they're not getting rich, but they're off the welfare rolls and gainfully employed. I suppose the guy would appreciate being slipped an extra 10 or 20 bux.
The Cable and Satellite TV industry does not hold the patent on alienating its customers, but COMCAST in particular has succeeded in making an art form of it, garnering them the distinction of "Most Universally Despised" of all PAY-TV providers in the industry.




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