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Guest Message by DevFuse

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what fittings do you use?


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26 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Nabisco

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 07:55 PM

i was wanting to know what is better, i get regular compression fittings given to me. i have notice that the snap and seal fittings seem to work better. i have never used them but compared to my regular fittings with the rubber bushing that i have to use to keep the water out compared to the regular snap and seal the snap and seal works better. a lot of service calls i go to i see that the fittings we use are bad.
is it the snap and seal are they better?

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#2 OFFLINE   HDTVsportsfan

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 07:57 PM

I've had good success with the compression fittings. Of course, I'm sure, quality comes into play. As it would for anything for that matter.
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#3 OFFLINE   DTV Tech

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 08:39 PM

Keep a few things in mind regarding my answer (or anyone's opinion):

1. Opinions are like ....(you can fill in that blank, I'm sure! :D )
2. Make sure you are comparing apples-to-apples, ie. indoor vs outdoor usage
3. Looking for quality/top shelf parts or trying to save a few bucks
4. Installation completed by exp. tech/installer or newbie with little or no training (yes, it does happen!! :eek2: )

With that said...

My first question to you would be... "Snap and Seal" sounds more like a sandwich bag than a connector. Are you talking about BNC connections commonly used with network switches and fiber?

I can only relate based on what experiences I see DAILY with the Service Calls that I go on. I would have to say that AT LEAST 50% of the service calls I attend to end up being fittings related. What that means is that whether they are crimp-on or compression fittings, were they even installed correctly for the type used? Was it stripped and installed INTO the fitting correctly AND completely? Were connectors used selectively, ie. using fittings with the rubber seat next to the threads for outdoor use to keep out moisture and liquids? Did the installer re-use old wire pulled off a previous job that has been outdoors already possibly beyond it's life cycle? Blah, blah, blah.

I could go on and on, but I think you get the point. Many variables and choices and of course, does it relate to your wallet? Only you can decide. And a good question to ask yourself is... What would I use on MY OWN HOME?

In a nutshell... I'd go for F-Connector compression fittings by PPC every day of the week. (Oh, I already to that, :lol: and coincidentally, it does relate to my own wallet since it is an expense I am responsible for providing! :) )

Hope that helps ya!!

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#4 OFFLINE   TigersFanJJ

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 12:23 AM

My first question to you would be... "Snap and Seal" sounds more like a sandwich bag than a connector. Are you talking about BNC connections commonly used with network switches and fiber?


Regardless of what they sound like, snap and seal are indeed compression fittings. And excellent fittings at that. T&B does make a snap and seal bnc connector, however, I'm pretty sure it is the f connector that jdogg is referring to based on the fact that he is posting about his service calls in the D* forum. :D


And a good question to ask yourself is... What would I use on MY OWN HOME?


Yes, I did use snap and seal fittings on my own home (on all 24 cable drops and the 7 lines coming into my media panel from the outside).

#5 OFFLINE   HarleyD

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 08:31 AM

Mastec uses snap and seal, so obviously a top-tier professional installation operation thinks they are professional grade.

The Mastec installer also left me about a dozen extra snap and seal F connectors for my own use (I told them I would be doing some additional custom cable runs) and I went to Lowes and picked up a snap and seal crimper/installer along with a coax stripper.

Once I got the stripper adjusted properly for RG6 these things are great. I can fab a custom RG6 cable in a couple of minutes and they are rock solid reliable...or at least they haven't failed on me yet.
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#6 OFFLINE   SledDog

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 10:43 AM

I agree. Mastec did my install also. Snap and seal are the only way to go. It would appear many Mastec's installers have the same view on leaving extras. Mine left me a dozen of them for future use also.

#7 OFFLINE   HDTVsportsfan

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 10:55 AM

I'm not sure where the "snap" descritpion comes into play. The compression hand tool I use doesn't make any noises/sound when i put the compression fittings on.

Are compression fittings really referred too as "snap and seal"? If not we should just go back to "compression fittings" if that's what we are all referring too.
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#8 OFFLINE   HarleyD

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:03 AM

I'm not sure where the "snap" descritpion comes into play. The compression hand tool I use doesn't make any noises/sound when i put the compression fittings on.

Are compression fittings really referred too as "snap and seal"? If not we should just go back to "compression fittings" if that's what we are all referring too.

Nope. Different from the old school compression fittings.

This is what they look like...

Posted Image


The crimper presses the blue sleeve into the fitting and the collar of the fitting squeezes that collar around the cable making a secure, watertight seal. And no, mine don't "snap" either. They kind of press into place...pretty smoothly.
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#9 OFFLINE   Jason Nipp

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:07 AM

I use Skywalker compress & seal fittings.

I find they work well as I haven't had any of the fittings fail in the several years that I have been using them. I also find them to be at a very favorable price point.

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#10 OFFLINE   HDTVsportsfan

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:12 AM

Harley,

I consider the picture you provided plain jane compression fittings. Which is what i use.
Maybe we (me/I) have a termionolgy gap going here. When you say old style, I think the crimp style, ratched hand tool that "crimps" the connector in the shape of an octagon/pentagon or similiar.

I guess I'm just trying to figure out where the "snap and seal" description came from. I thought maybe yet a newer tool and connector came out over the last year that I missed.
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#11 OFFLINE   mn_sniper

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:16 AM

PPC EX6-XL are a quality fitting, however they will run a bit more than the T&B Snap and Seal. (I am fairly sure that the Snap & Seal name comes from the fact that the rear compression plastic was once attached to the side of the fitting, snapped off the fitting while it was over the cable and then "Sealed" with a compression tool.) I know that this is a BNC fitting but the F-Conns once came like this too.

Posted Image

#12 OFFLINE   bobnielsen

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:22 AM

I found Snap-N-Seal connectors in the Thomas & Betts catalog http://www-public.tn...s/snapnseal.pdf. The term is a registered trademark. They look very similar to the DataShark compression connectors I bought at Home Depot, but come in various colors and connector types. T&B is a well-known brand which has been around for quite a while.

#13 OFFLINE   HarleyD

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:22 AM

Harley,

I consider the picture you provided plain jane compression fittings. Which is what i use.
Maybe we (me/I) have a terminolgy gap going here. When you say old style, I think the crimp style, racthed hand tool that "crimps" the connector in the shape of an octagon/pentagon or similiar.

I guess I'm just trying to figure out where the "snap and seal" description came from. I thought maybe yet a newer tool and connector came out over the last year that I missed.

The tool for the snap and seals holds the entire fitting within the lever of the tool.

The pre-stripped coax is inserted into the end of the blue collar until it seats completely with the center conductor sticking out.

When the connector tool is squeezed by hand, it presses on the rim of the blue collar in the same direction as the cable is inserted, forcing the blue plastic collar up inside of the metal colar part of the fitting rather than the tool wrapping around the outside of the fitting and compressing it against the coax insulation when squeezed.

It is the snug fit of the blue plastic within the metal collar portion of the fitting that actually compresses the plastic collar against the coax and not the installation tool crushing the fitting against the coax.
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#14 OFFLINE   Tgrim1

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:22 AM

I'm pretty sure that "Snap-N-Seal" is a compression fitting, "crimp" is the old style.
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#15 OFFLINE   HarleyD

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:26 AM

Maybe that's where I'm creating confusion.
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#16 OFFLINE   HDTVsportsfan

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:31 AM

Harley,

Nice description and that is what I have been using over the last couple of years.
Data-Shark or Ideal work fine for me.

Bobnielson provided a nice piece of information. I didn't know Snap-and-Seal was a trademark branded name. I just got hung up on the description of "snap". Mine have never made a "snap" noise. :grin:
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#17 OFFLINE   Nabisco

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 12:59 PM

thanks for the good advice

#18 OFFLINE   stogie5150

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 09:37 PM

I use Skywalker compress & seal fittings.

I find they work well as I haven't had any of the fittings fail in the several years that I have been using them. I also find them to be at a very favorable price point.



I use those too. No issues. :)
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#19 OFFLINE   Tom Robertson

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:28 PM

I have some older snap and seals on some jumper cables that the connectors have fallen off/loosened. They are the red plastic models, I hope the blue are better! I have a ton of the PCT-DRS-6 fittings. (When you install the cables, dish, and receivers for they installers they tend to leave you extras...) :)

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#20 OFFLINE   funhouse69

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 11:55 PM

Snap & Seal is a Brand Name as mentioned elsewhere but people usually refer to them as the type of connector as well. I've had tremendous luck with them since the day I switched to them from some no name compression fitting.

Some of the compression tools are very expensive however I found this one a few years ago and it works absolutely perfect with the Snap and Seal RG6 "F" Connectors and its stripper is set by default for RG6 Quad. I buy the connectors in bags of 100 at my local electronics store.

To be fair the only time I've had any issue with other brand fittings is when you mismatch the cable with the fitting. I know it might sound like a no-brainer but there are a few different flavors of RG6 cable. The most commonly used now is RG6 Quad which is all that I use now. I get rolls of 500' of the double also from my local supplier.

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