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1 or 4 or 5 oceans

Discussion in 'The OT' started by fluffybear, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Funny ... How it could be "discovered" when Native Americans lived here for many centuries ?
    I'm would think it's mean to unknown to anyone. Or you think Europeans was superior to Natives so those cannot be treated as humans with discovering abilities ?
    BTW, wasn't maps before Columbo charted the Americas ?
     
  2. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    There is some evidence that humans from the area of Europe came to North America about 10,000 years before anyone came from Siberia.
     
  3. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    That would be much difficult to prove - if travel over Bering "bridge" easy to imagine (adding genetic expertise) , but over Atlantic ? Any link to the research ? Or it's just someone's self proclaimed theory to receive a grant ?
     
  4. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Well, I've never been to Philadelphia, so maybe I should go there and 'discover' it despite the fact that there are millions already there.

    Columbus didn't 'discover' anything either with or without his rumpled trenchcoat. I'm not sure he ever set foot on 'America', unless you consider some island several hundred miles off shore to qualify.

    Aside from that, there's pretty solid evidence that the Norse had been here many times before and had started a few settlements in the northeast.
     
  5. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Not before Asians, nor dpeters11 "humans from the area of Europe came to North America about 10,000 years before anyone came from Siberia"; you should study what ships was build in Europe 10,000 years ago. And genes of Native Americans.
     
  6. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Heck, I just discovered a new butterfly around my house - I'm sure folks have seen them before, but for me it was a "discovery." I don't plan to trap and move them, however.;)
     
  7. armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    I have a real urge to re-watch Waterworld
     
  8. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Put down that remote, Sir! Please back away from the remote! Slowly put the remote on the floor and back away slowly.
     
  9. armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    ALRIGHT!! I have had enough of the Waterworld bashing!! It was a fine movie with some real great keeper lines. I am getting sick and tired of defending this under rated classic. I owned it on VHS, DVD, and now Blu-ray. The man lived on urine for crying out loud!
     
  10. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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  11. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Try more like 14,000 years ago. Assuming these Eskimos were the ancestors of Native American people all over North and South America, it needs to be at least that long ago.

    The Clovis people, who left very identifiable pointed rock artifacts far south of Alaska in North America, were originally dated to 11,000 years ago. Lately, that has been pushed back to more like 13,500 years. There is mounting evidence that will take human habitation of the Western Hemisphere back to maybe 18-20,000 years ago.

    And I'm OK saying these folks discovered America. My cat discovers mice out in the yard. She wasn't on an adventure; she was looking for food. How fine do you want to parse the word "discovery"?
     
  12. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    If you're not a "historian", the correct word, or a genetic researcher then maybe you shouldn't go around acting as if you are one.

    What I do or do not believe has nothing to do with it. The information I have is in black and white and can be found all over.
     
  13. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you should just stop acting like you know everything...
     
  14. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    So what is your point, RunnerFL? Outside of disagreeing with some of the posts here, and stating that the Eskimos in Alaska are indigenous, I don't see your position. How and when do you think human beings came to North America?

    I realize I ask this without stating mine. I take the standard view. The oldest evidence of humans in the Western Hemisphere is found in Alaska and dates back to about 30,000 years ago. I assume those people eventually migrated south to all parts of North and South America. There is becoming too much evidence from separate sites to not think this happened at least 18-20,000 years ago although the scientific community still says 13,500 to 11,200 is the right figure. Puzzling anomalies remain. One, there is a unique genetic link of Native Americans to indigenous tribes in Southeast Asia. Whether these folks came over the Bering land bridge or by boat across the Pacific, I have no idea. Two, every time we look, we find people coming from Europe in earlier and earlier periods. Who knows when Europeans first made the trip? I've always liked the romantic notion of the Phoenicians making the journey but of course, that's my wish, not fact.
     
  15. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    I've discovered that this thread has deteriorated beyond redemption..... :nono:

    Edit: Now brought back to the plus side by Dr. Spock....
     
  16. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    That is my position, so I guess you do see it.

    In the grand scheme of things does it really matter?
     
  17. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Silly me. I thought this was a discussion group.
     
  18. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    For me, its the same thing as other historical events that don't necessarily affect every day life or the various explorations of science (Mars, quarks etc.) It may not actually mean much to everyday life (though who knows about the future in terms of scientific discovery), but I don't think we should forget or not find out where we have been as a planet.
     
  19. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    I don't mean it doesn't matter to science or history, I mean it doesn't matter in regards to the way I was attacked for someone thinking I didn't have a point.
     
  20. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    The question remains..........

    How would a grade school history teacher answer it?
     

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