1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1 or 4 or 5 oceans

Discussion in 'The OT' started by fluffybear, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,790
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    Paul Revere designed the crest for "Dummer Academy", America's oldest boarding school, which the father of a friend of mine attended in the 1940s. It took a court battle to finally change the name to The Governor's Academy. The Wall Street Journal lauded the change, in an article titled: The Dummer School gets a Smarter Name.
     
  2. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,399
    585
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    My "info" on CC comes from Samuel Eliot Morrison, a pre-eminent historian who's researched and written on all the great explorers. I don't think he had any reason to distort or make stuff up.

    But that's about it!
     
  3. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    That's how I remember it as well.

    I was in Junior High at the time. Our history teacher was out with Valley Fever for nearly the whole school year and the teacher they brought in as a sub liked to discuss how much of the history we are taught is nothing but a fraud.
     
  4. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

    5,858
    319
    Nov 2, 2007
    NE FL
    In Junior High at what time? Paul Revere's ride (1775) or Longfellow's poem (1860)? :D
     
  5. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

    4,567
    0
    Sep 3, 2004
    Laxguy, I'm not saying you made anything up or that the historian is wrong. I learned it that way, too. Columbus never hit the mainland of the Western Hemisphere on any of his voyages.

    First, my "Details, details..." reply was a typical, smart-ass one from me. My first reaction is to give a joking answer to most any post here. I don't always use smileys because often I think they are unnecessary. Maybe in this case they were.

    Second, my point remains: Columbus' voyages were crucial to the expansion of non-indigenous culture in the Americas whether he hit Hispaniola, Florida or New York City. It was his voyages which opened up the floodgates of exploration and settlers. Without him, it's hard to see how Cortes would have conquered the Aztecs and other tribes. Ponce de Leon, who was on Columbus' second voyage, lead this own trips to the New World starting in 1502, including exploring Puerto Rico and Florida (You want a direct connection between North America and Columbus? There it is, with one degree of separation.) Jamestown wouldn't have been settled a little over 100 years later. The Pilgrims wouldn't have arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620.

    Most importantly to me, John Neville, my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather, wouldn't have come over on the ship, Ark and the Dove, in 1634 and settled in Maryland.

    No matter where Columbus landed, he started all of this happening because of his four voyages to the New World. That's why I think he deserves the credit for discovering the Americas. Maybe he didn't land on the continents but was his foresight and determination that directly caused other people to make that step.
     
  6. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    when I heard the story about Paul Revere caving in to the British :p
     
  7. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,262
    133
    Jun 6, 2009
    The best I'll give him is that he popularized the shipping routes at a time of European greed and desire for expansion and domination. None of the indigenous peoples ended up being very happy about that.

    However, long before .....

    There is evidence that the Vikings made several trips and even started a few settlements up east.

    There is also discussion around Asians making trips to the west coasts of both the north and south continents. I'm not sure that's been proven yet to the satisfaction of the masses.
     
  8. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,262
    133
    Jun 6, 2009
    Next topic.

    What are they teaching today about Custer? Are they still teaching that he was some kind of hero worthy of statues and monuments? Or are they teaching the truth about him being a pompous, arrogant fool that cost the lives of his command?
     
  9. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,054
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    I was taught the "arrogant fool" angle back in High School in the 80's.

    And none of us know which is the truth, we weren't there.
     
  10. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,399
    585
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    RE: Custer

    The saga of Custer is noteworthy because it's an easily remembered snippet of history. At the same time, that isn't enough to repeat it. There's really no importance to the facts of the battle; it wasn't a turning point in anything.

    When the story was first told, there wasn't that much history in this nation. Now there is and it's time to forget the General.

    It did give rise to a fine song in the sixties, "Hey, Mr. Custer, I don't wanna go....."
     
  11. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

    4,567
    0
    Sep 3, 2004
    True.

    I think the truth about Custer lies somewhere between the martyr of my youth and the portrait of a fool that is popular today.

    I have real trouble reconciling the brilliant Civil War calvary officer I read about with the portrayal of an arrogant idiot recklessly leading his troops to their death a few years later at Little Big Horn.

    About the only part of everyone agrees on is George Armstrong Custer was very vain about his hair.
     
  12. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,399
    585
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    It could be as simple as Alzheimer's....
     
  13. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

    4,567
    0
    Sep 3, 2004
    Doubt it. He was 37 when he died.
     
  14. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,399
    585
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    Damn facts! Always getting in the way of otherwise good theories!

    How 'bout alcoholism, then??


    ** It was a woman who drove me to drink. I never wrote to thank her.

    ~ W.C. Fields
     
  15. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,345
    503
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    Of course back then, with the medicines of the day, you can have mercury, lead or arsenic poisoning
     
  16. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,054
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    Or untreated VD...
     

Share This Page