1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1080P

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by 325xia, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. Jun 14, 2009 #1 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    I have a 1080P Samsung HDTV. Yet, when I try and Test the 1080P from my DirecTV HD DVR, it says "This TV does not support the DirecTV 1080P Signal". Is there something I need to do in order to get the two to communicate correctly? I have a Samsung LN-S4695D TV and a HR20/700 DirecTV Receiver.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jun 14, 2009 #2 of 146
    sarfdawg

    sarfdawg Legend

    191
    0
    Jan 21, 2007
    Your TV may not support 1080p/24fps. You may only get 1080p/60fps. I'm in that boat as well. If you try to view 1080p content via DirecTV, chances are you will only be able to see about 1/4 of the picture you should. If you turn 1080p off of your settings on your DirecTV receiver, you will notice that your 1080i picture of what should be 1080p programming will look exceptionally sharp. Not 1080p, but it may be the best you can do.
     
  3. Jun 14, 2009 #3 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    Okay. Thanks. I sure wonder why I was told I was getting a TV that would support 1080P in the future. What a joke. Why did I spend the extra cash for something I can't use through DirecTV. I guess Blue Ray is all my 1080P is good for. I also wonder why DirecTV chose to go with this method of 1080P? I'm sure a lot of people are experiencing the same thing you and I are.
     
  4. Jun 14, 2009 #4 of 146
    LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

    4,290
    1
    Sep 22, 2006
    As the production year for this set dates from 2005, it is unlikely to support 1080p/24.

    1080P/24 most closely represents the frame rate that movies are produced in. Most sets built now fully support the frame rate and a majority have since around 2007.



     
  5. Jun 14, 2009 #5 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    I understand what you are saying. I bought my HDTV back in the Fall of '06. I'm not about to buy another one just to utilize 1080P24.
     
  6. Jun 14, 2009 #6 of 146
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,684
    349
    Dec 9, 2006
    Sony screwed me also by not disclosing "which" 1080p.
    BluRay is also 1080p/24, but the player upconverts this to 1080p/60.
    The chips in the STB can't convert/output 1080p/60.
     
  7. Jun 14, 2009 #7 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    ^^^Good to know. Thanks.
     
  8. Jun 14, 2009 #8 of 146
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,684
    349
    Dec 9, 2006
    1080p programs are still a "plus" for us though. The bit-rate can be better used for PQ [ranges from 2-16 Mb/s] and the STB converting this to 1080i has given [me] some great looking images.
     
  9. Jun 14, 2009 #9 of 146
    Kojo62

    Kojo62 AllStar

    70
    2
    Aug 9, 2007
    PA, USA
    Sadly, I have the same issue. My Sharp LCD does not support 1080p/24, only 1080p/60. So I know how you feel 325xia.

    I didn't even know to look for 24fps support when I bought my TV back in 2007. I thought I had really done my HDTV homework, too.

    So it was quite a shock when my set failed D*'s "Incredible Hulk" 1080p test video last year. It had always been able to handle the 1080p signals from my Xbox 360 and upconverting DVD player, so I never knew it was lacking in anything.

    Hopefully, downconverted 1080i programs won't look too bad on it, although I can't verify that since I haven't bought any of the 1080p content from D* yet.
     
  10. Jun 14, 2009 #10 of 146
    barryb

    barryb New Member

    2,937
    3
    Aug 26, 2007
    Here you will see the specs on your TV, along with refresh rates (on the left):

    http://www.hdtvexpert.com/pages_b/Samsung_LN-S4695D.html

    As others have pointed out.... 1080p/60 is the culprit.

    I have a Sony similar to what veryoldschool has, so I am in the same boat with you guys.
     
  11. Jun 14, 2009 #11 of 146
    thekochs

    thekochs DirecTV 10yr+ Customer

    1,009
    2
    Oct 7, 2006
    I was wondering how DirecTV was able to firmware upgrade to 1080P support...guess this now makes sense....1080P/24...not 60. Too bad, but hey I'm still on WXGA (1368x768) TVs with 720P running.
     
  12. Jun 14, 2009 #12 of 146
    BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    In 2005, exactly ZERO TVs from any manufacturer supported 1080/24p, and in 2006, exactly ONE TV did (a single high-end Pioneer Pro model). It wasn't until 2007 that 1080/24p support was added by most (but not all) manufacturers. It isn't brand-specific.

    Most HD content (both video and film transfers) is shot at 24 frames per second, which is the speed that pro film cameras have always used. Blu-Rays are virtually all mastered at 1080/24p, as is all "1080p" VoD content. It's the best format for most content. The issue is that no manufacturer wanted to pay to include 1080/24p support until there were source devices that could output in that format, and that didn't happen until Toshiba released their first HD-DVD player in 2006.
     
  13. Jun 14, 2009 #13 of 146
    sarfdawg

    sarfdawg Legend

    191
    0
    Jan 21, 2007
    I hate to be a DirecTV party pooper (I LOVE my DirecTV). That said, I don't even think about purchasing a movie on DirecTV now. I have the lowest priced Netflix plan with Blu-Ray, and it comes to about $11/mo. At $6/movie on DirecTV, it is pointless. If you don't like only one movie at a time, 2 and 3 at a time are not much more expensive. The picture on Blu-Ray is 1080p no matter what, and I'm getting way more bang for the buck.

    Again, I LOVE DirecTV, but I don't get terribly worked up about not having a 1080p/24 set.
     
  14. Jun 14, 2009 #14 of 146
    dcowboy7

    dcowboy7 Hall Of Fame

    4,756
    26
    May 22, 2008
    Pequannock, NJ
    Technology just cant be kept up with.

    hdtvs had a 60hz refresh rate....then 120hz....now even thats old....the new models out now have 240hz.

    Its impossible to keep up with the latest/greatest stuff.
     
  15. Jun 14, 2009 #15 of 146
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,684
    349
    Dec 9, 2006
    120 is used because it works for both 1080/60 [2x] & 1080/24 [5x] and 240 is just "must be better" than 120.
     
  16. Jun 15, 2009 #16 of 146
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    14,040
    94
    Jan 24, 2007
    Of course it's better...it's a bigger number.... :lol:

    It is odd how some people have problems, even though they have TVs that are supposed to display1080p/24.

    When I go my new TV I went into Setup and added in the 1080p under the resolutions tab. Other then me selecting 1080p does the HR2x have any idea what the TV is capable of?

    Mike
     
  17. Jun 15, 2009 #17 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    Thanks for the input and especially the info on my TV! So, does anything offer 1080p 60??? (ie., X-Box, Blue Ray, Dish, etc.). From what I'm hearing hear, there is nothing.
     
  18. Jun 15, 2009 #18 of 146
    DogLover

    DogLover Hall Of Fame

    2,510
    0
    Mar 18, 2007
    If you are connected with HDMI, that information is transmitted back to the DVR.
     
  19. Jun 15, 2009 #19 of 146
    Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

    37,060
    287
    Jun 18, 2006
    As far as I know there's nothing that is really encoded in 1080p/60, no.
     
  20. Jun 15, 2009 #20 of 146
    325xia

    325xia AllStar

    55
    0
    Oct 28, 2006
    ^^^ Ok. Thanks. I guess there is no way to see how well my TV can look. Ha!
     

Share This Page