25 most dangerous cities in US 2003

Discussion in 'The OT' started by John Corn, Jan 2, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Jan 2, 2004 #1 of 16
    John Corn

    John Corn Hall Of Fame

    5,046
    0
    Mar 21, 2002
    For the qualifications: The Morgan Quitno Safest City Award is based on a city’s rate for six basic crime categories: murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary and motor vehicle theft. All cities of 75,000+ populations that reported crime data to the FBI for the six crime categories were included in the rankings. Final 2002 statistics, released by the FBI on October 27, 2003, were used to determine the rankings.

    http://www.governmentguide.com/community_and_home/morganmostdangerouscities.adp
     
  2. Jan 2, 2004 #2 of 16
    Nick

    Nick Charter Gold Club Member DBSTalk Club

    22,054
    269
    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    Atlanta is #3. Forget southern hospitality. :rolleyes:

    Looks like I moved away from that cesspool of crime just in time. I watch Atlanta news from a distance. Multiple murders, rapes, daily carjackings, drive-bys, home invasions, child sexual abuse by teachers, coaches, even school administrators, stranger assaults and the like dominate the news every day. Drugs and prostitution flourish, 12-13 yr old girls forced to walk the streets, kids beaten to death by their parents, caretakers or even playmates; bodies found on the side of the roads and in vacant lots are almost a daily occurance. It's like an evil plague has engulfed Atlanta and the metro area in general. The influx of foreigners has only added to what was already a very bad cirme situation. Ethnic gangs flourish, terrorizing their own people. Gang graffitti tags, virtually unseen 10 years ago, now cover almost anything that doesn't move.

    Lock your doors, don't drive at night, watch your kids every second; women, don't park in isolated lots or decks; reinforce your doors and have a weapon at the ready to defend yourself and your family. Don't expect the police to help. They're too busy answering calls to multiple and serial traffic incidents or directing traffic around the latest street cave-in as the city's aging infrastructure collapses around its citizens.

    The city crime rankings don't tell the human story. It's all-out war on civilized society. Today, you're probably safer in Bahgdad than you are in Atlanta.

    Sad to say.
     
  3. Jan 2, 2004 #3 of 16
    Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

    21,331
    1
    Mar 25, 2002
    I am amazed that Ohio ranks highest in number of cities with four out of the 25. Very sad. John, it's time to move on.
     
  4. Jan 2, 2004 #4 of 16
    Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

    4,885
    0
    Jul 5, 2002
    The city crime rankings don't tell the human story. It's all-out war on civilized society. Today, you're probably safer in Bahgdad than you are in Atlanta.

    Wow, I have always felt very safe here.

    I used to walk from Ga. Tech to downtown (main library) once a week from 88-92, right through Techwood and never felt uncomfortable.

    When I lived next to a strip joint on Howell Mill Rd, I saw lots of drug deals going on, but I wouldn't worry about waiting at a bus stand nearby everday to go to work.

    When I was on Memorial Drive (just a mile from the prison), I never worried about being mugged or harmed.

    I move out to Mall of Georgia suburbs (30 miles outside Atlanta limits), and our car gets broken into and our CD changer is stolen.

    ;)
     
  5. Jan 2, 2004 #5 of 16
    Kevin

    Kevin Icon/Supporter

    873
    0
    Mar 26, 2002
    It's a disgrace to see our capitol city, Washington, DC, ranked so high on the list. It reflects poorly upon the country itself...

    However, it's nice to see that New York is nowhere to be found on that list. Amazing how they cleaned that city up from just a few decades ago, when it would have easily been placed in the Top 5.
     
  6. Jan 2, 2004 #6 of 16
    paulh

    paulh Godfather

    447
    0
    Mar 17, 2003
    DC has been on the top of crime lists for as long as I remember in my (short 29) years. I think you're OK in the mall (not shopping), but I've heard it's bad even a block behind the white house. It's really a shame.

    Of course look who gets elected mayor, and the city is not accountable to any state, and gets free voting rights to congress.... Plus why would any Rudy G type emerge in DC. You certaintly wouldn't be top dog there...
     
  7. Jan 2, 2004 #7 of 16
    lee635

    lee635 Hall Of Fame

    2,025
    2
    Apr 17, 2002
    Having actually lived in the District, I'd counter some of your comments with this: Whoever gets elected mayor works under the ever present eye of a congressional subcommittee that oversees the District. The Feds continue to meddle in the affairs of this small body of land usually to the detriment of the city.

    Their congressional representatives are NON-voting. So where are the free voting rights to congress?

    HEHE, it's not bad a block behind the White House or most anywhere near Federal buildings. The crime is centered in "southeast", literally the southest quarter of the city where there is rampant povery and delapidated housing, etc. like many big cities. There's some crime all over the city, but southeast is the problematic.
     
  8. Jan 2, 2004 #8 of 16
    Nick

    Nick Charter Gold Club Member DBSTalk Club

    22,054
    269
    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    Actually, immediately south of the WH is the Ellipse, then Constitution Ave and the National Park area including the Reflecting Pool that lies between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. You may be thinking of what has been said about the decaying residential area a few blocks SE of the Capitol Building.
     
  9. Jan 2, 2004 #9 of 16
    jwwahly

    jwwahly Legend/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

    189
    0
    Dec 21, 2003
    Wow! Reading Pa. over Philly.
     
  10. Bogy

    Bogy Hall Of Fame

    13,242
    1
    Mar 23, 2002
    Second most dangerous city in the U.S., St. Louis. I used to live in St. Louis County, which is a whole different place. My daughter was living in St. Louis City itself, just a few miles from the arch, until Tuesday when we moved her. She is now living about five miles further west, just over the city/county line in Shrewsberry.

    St. Louis is a city where the difference between safe and dangerous, beautifully kept and burned out boarded over hulk is often a matter of a couple of blocks. My wife used to work in north St. Louis City, in one of the most dangerous areas, visiting her clients in their homes. She would call me to let me know where she would be and for how long. If I had not heard from her I would have made the appropriate calls. Fortunately I never had to, she never had a problem. She also made sure she was never there after dark.
     
  11. Cyclone

    Cyclone Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

    2,425
    0
    Jul 1, 2002
    DC is pretty safe if you stay out of South East.

    I'm just surprised that Newark NJ is nowhere on the list.
     
  12. BobMurdoch

    BobMurdoch Hall Of Fame

    4,009
    0
    Apr 24, 2002
    Hmmm. Camden and Trenton are Jersey's trouble spots. No fight outta me on Camden. That town is a sinkhole for money that lines the pockets of local political bosses but doesn't affect any real change. Trenton is a little surprising. The capitol of NJ has a few trouble spots, but I didn't think it was bad enough to merit national scorn.

    More important is the lack of OTHER NJ cities on this list. Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Red Bank, Atlantic City, and Asbury Park.

    All of these were dicey places (pardon the pun for AC) that have really bounced back due to a combination of good civic planning and yuppies coming in and driving up the housing values. Red Bank, Jersey City, and Hoboken are model cities that have undergone a transformation equal in scope to Times Square. They were all just decaying old towns past their prime in the early 80's and are now local magnets for higher income households, with the resulting drop in crime rates.

    Even Asbury Park, perennial failed reclamation project looks to be the next city to bounce back based on the number of people spending mucho dinero to bring it back. I never understood how an oceanfront community could stay down for so long, especially with other towns in Monmouth County doubling in value over the last few years.
     
  13. Kevin

    Kevin Icon/Supporter

    873
    0
    Mar 26, 2002
    I was visiting Asbury Park for a concert several years ago. The town looked like it was a popular vacation spot many years ago, and then everyone packed their bags and deserted the place. It's a shame to see such a nice area being wasted, it definately could have been as nice as other areas like Point Pleasant. Have they fixed it up since then?
     
  14. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

    21,331
    1
    Mar 25, 2002
    Many years ago (1962-64?) I lived in Levittown, Pa and delivered the Trenton Times newspaper to customers in Levittown. It was a smaller paper, but competition to the Phil. Enquirer. Trenton at that time was a typical mid sized industrial city. I recall a bridge connecting Trenton to Pa. (Bristol?) with a very large sign on it that said "Trenton Makes, The World Takes" as sort of a salute to the industries of Trenton. Is that sign still there.

    I notice not a mention of Minneapolis or St. Paul. Must be too cold there to have the riff raff who cause such problems. :D Actually I drove cab in my college days, something I would never attempt to do today. I would go into the "worst" areas of the city without fears, even areas where other drivers refused to go (yea, I was slightly crazy).
     
  15. Bogy

    Bogy Hall Of Fame

    13,242
    1
    Mar 23, 2002
    Omaha, as well as Minneapolis and St. Paul are all missing from both the top and bottom of the safest/most dangerous lists.
    http://www.morganquitno.com/cit04pop.htm
    They are obviously somewhere inbetween, but after paying to support this site I can't afford the $3 for the entire list. :D
     
  16. BobMurdoch

    BobMurdoch Hall Of Fame

    4,009
    0
    Apr 24, 2002
    Due to a plethora of political shenanigans, renewal efforts stalled for three decades. The huge runup in local housing prices, and the rebirth of former downtrodden cities such as Red Bank and Brick have convinced a number of investors to take another crack at fixing the area. It is beginning to see the rumbles of the economy, but like the national economy, skeptics want to see a sustained recovery before they will fully commit to the area. Once again, I can't see how a city surrounded by Ocean Grove, Deal, Sea Girt, and Spring Lake (all high money towns) can't get back on its feet.

    Plus you've got people like Bruce Springsteen, Danny Devito, and The Sopranos cast pumping star power into the area. I'm surprised Danny hasn't hooked his old roommate, Michael Douglas into helping more. Ditto for Jack Nicholson, who is a graduate of Manasquan High School nearby.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

spam firewall