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3D on D*

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by tacua, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

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    IMO the reason they are all going with shutter glasses is they think they will make more money that way. They will all try to come up with proprietary shutter glasses that you have to buy from them at big markups. They know that the glasses will be easily lost or broken and people will keep buying more and more of them.

    With polarized everyone could just go to Walmart and pick up 10 pairs for $20 or so if they were having a bunch of people over, or whenever they needed more.

    Why do you think they can't do 1080p with polarized? I thought there were a couple of them at CES?
     
  2. cartrivision

    cartrivision Hall Of Fame

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    That has nothing to do with "3D standards". Virtually any 3D standard can present something that appears to be in front of the screen plane as well as behind it. Avatar did both as do many other 3D movies.
     
  3. cartrivision

    cartrivision Hall Of Fame

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    According to recent news reports/press releases, 3D TV systems will be available in Best Buy stores this week at a cost of under $4000... which will include a Blu-ray player and the 3D glasses.
     
  4. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    The way the polarized screen works is by having alternating polarization filters on each line of the screen. So it's only possible for each eye to see 540 of the lines. The only way 1080 lines to each eye would be possible is if the resolution of the display panel were doubled to 3840x2160. And that's not happening in the near future. ;)
     
  5. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

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    I thought that's how RealD XLS works, but I thought Dolby3D and regular RealD just showed the polarized frames seperately. They would show one eye then the other. So for movies rather than 24p they would be run at 48p with one frame being the left, and one being the right. With a 240p TV that shouldn't be an issue (obviously for 60Hz and 120Hz TVs there could be judder issues).
     
  6. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    You're talking about theater technology, which is very different from what will be used in the home.

    AFAIK, there is no technology out there that can switch the polarization of an entire display panel that quickly. At least nothing that is close to consumer-level.
     
  7. Spoffo

    Spoffo Legend

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    The panasonic set (TC-P50VT20 or 25) uses full 1080P at 120 FPS, so you get a full 1080 at 60 fps for each eye using the shutter glasses, which are sync'd by an IR emitter on the bezel of the set. They are demo-ing it right now at selected Best Buys in major markets, and the folks over at AVS who have actually seen it say it looks terrific, though the content on the demo disk is pretty limited. The TV - - which is also Panny's top of the line 2D plasma for 2010 - - comes with one pair of shutter glasses in the box. They are powered by a watch battery in the frame, and additional pairs are $150 each. (Which is why you'll never see this technology, which is potentially better than polarization, at the movie house.)

    Those signal specs are for the 3D BluRay player Panasonic is introducing at the same time. It's not clear to me if there's a possibility for DirecTv to work with this set using some different video format, but I sorta doubt it. (And Direct is definitely promoting their 3D as a Panasonic tie-in, Just check their website.)

    My guess is that they'll cope with the humongous bandwidth need implied by 1080p/120fps with gobs of compression - - and it will probably work: a good 3D effect might cover for quite a bit of lost picture detail.

    It will be an interesting year, followed by a looooong wait for significant amounts of actual 3D content.
     
  8. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    Every set that uses active-shutter glasses, that I'm aware of, does full 1080p60 to each eye.
    There is no requirement that the STB output has to be 120 Hz, and it won't be from DirecTV.
    They'll cope with the bandwidth needed by 1080p/120 by not broadcasting 1080p/120. DirecTV's HD will not be 1080p to each eye, and I assume it'll be 24fps.
     
  9. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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  10. taz291819

    taz291819 Godfather

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    Theaters that use Xpand use shutter glasses. Very popular in Europe, and we have one here in Huntsville, at the NASA Marshall Space and Rocket Center.

    Directv will be using the SbS method, which is compatible with this display.

    Nope, 1080p24 for movies, 1080i60 for other material.
     
  11. taz291819

    taz291819 Godfather

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    Except for current and legacy DLPs. Mits has hinted that TI is working on a true 1080p chip for 3D and DLPs.
     
  12. wilbur_the_goose

    wilbur_the_goose Hall Of Fame

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    They just announced 3D's killer app.

    The Masters will be in HD 3D this year. Just heard the announcement on the Golf Channel.
     
  13. Spoffo

    Spoffo Legend

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    Jeremy -

    Enlighten me.

    As I understand what you're saying, all the satellite box has to do is decode an MPEG4 stream to provide a 1080px30fps multiplexed 3D signal to the display via HDMI 1.4. (According to several sources I did manage to find, such a signal only requires about 50% more bitstream than a 2D 1080p signal.) Then the display decodes this into separate 1080px30fps left and right images. Then it alternately displays the left and right images at 60fps each for a overall 120fps display.

    For film, the source signal would be multiplexed 1080x24fps. The display would decode these to left and right 1080x24fps images and display these at 120 fps using a 3:2 pulldown sequence. (There's no mention in the Panasonic material of 96fps film display for 3D, presumably because of flicker issues, or maybe just engineering simplicity.)

    Where can I find a decent tech write-up of the details of this?
     
  14. Rikinky

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    Instead of investing money into something that no one in America owns right now why not invest the bandwith and money into more HD Channels so all the folks that went out and bought new HDTV'S can enjoy this technology. Geez when does it ever end? Go ahead and drop $2500 to God only knows what for A TV and technology that has a great probability of flopping just MHO!
     
  15. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The big question here is what impact do those damn color wheels have for single chip DLPs.
     
  16. taz291819

    taz291819 Godfather

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    There are currently around 4 million 3D-Ready DLPs already in people's homes.
     
  17. oldfantom

    oldfantom Icon

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    Not even a slightly aggressive app. Golf in 3D? Really. When I think about 3D, I think about Jaws 3D and Friday the 13th 3D. I also think about the dang headache I had at the end of up. So maybe some three hundred dollar shutter glasses are the solution. Not for me. Of course, you can tell me that 3D is obviously the wave of the future because everyone is spending so much money to create 3D sets. I am not sure that the American consumer is ready to drink from this fountain.
     
  18. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

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    No, the set I watched 3D on at CES was a Mits DLP (72737, IIRC)
     
  19. wilbur_the_goose

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    oldfantom,
    I went to 2 practice rounds at Augusta in 2005. I don't think there would be a better course for 3D than Augusta. Unless you've been there, you have no idea how far downhill #10 and #11 go
     
  20. oldfantom

    oldfantom Icon

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    I will concede every point you made, and still contend that this is not a killer app. Lotus 1-2-3 was a killer app that brought PC's into the lives of average workers. That lead to a proliferation of computers at work and at home. I have used lotus 1-2-3, the masters is no Lotus 1-2-3.

    Sorry, I just had that Kennedy quote running through my head.

    I do not see the price point and the inconvenience of special equipment at a point where people are going to rush to best buy. Avatar made great money, but there is a huge difference in paying $10 per family member for a movie ticket and paying $3,000 plus $300 per view in the household for home viewing.
     

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