4k HDR on DirecTV. Saw it last night, and it's great!

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by wilbur_the_goose, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. Dec 28, 2017 #81 of 119
    wilbur_the_goose

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    Yeah - the D* GUI is quite dim when an HDR program is on. Clears right up when you switch to non-HDR content.
     
  2. Dec 28, 2017 #82 of 119
    wilbur_the_goose

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    @je4755 - no issues with the client. I'm using a Genie 2 (HS-17)
     
  3. Dec 29, 2017 #83 of 119
    je4755

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    Thanks very much, sir!

    I looked at a C7 + LG sound bar combo yesterday but will wait to see if there are any material technical improvements in the 2018 models (my understanding is manufacturers may assign a new rubric to a given performance spec in an effort at masking the fact it constitutes a minor upgrade at best).

    In this regard, I hope information about 2018 sets appears next month, so I can reach a decision shortly. Should I ultimately wait for a 2018 LG OLED, with a presumed purchase availability around May, it would constitute a tolerable delay in enjoying DirecTV’s 4k/HDR offerings.
     
  4. Dec 29, 2017 #84 of 119
    wilbur_the_goose

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    Personally, I'd go for the best price you can get, whichever year (almost certainly a 2017 model). Take the money you save and get an ISF calibration.
     
  5. Dec 29, 2017 #85 of 119
    je4755

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    Thanks again! I also assume prices for 2017 sets will decline upon the arrival of the 2018s.

    In the interim I am swimming in acronyms, some (or none) of which may be relevant to 2018 LGs, instanced by HDMI 2.1, HFR and QFT. Fortunately, LG’s media day event at CES will be held during the morning of January 8th, with the assumption this presentation will trumpet any novel technical capabilities associated with their 2018 OLEDs.
     
  6. Dec 30, 2017 #86 of 119
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    The prices for 2017 OLEDs probably won't decline much since LG is able to sell as many as they make. Some retailers who are in an overstock condition might knock the price down a bit to make way for 2018 models but I wouldn't count on much savings.

    Particularly if the 2018 model is HDMI 2.1 and HFR it would be worth paying a little extra for to get the future proofing. Otherwise when 120 fps 4K arrives you'll be left behind.
     
  7. Dec 30, 2017 #87 of 119
    wilbur_the_goose

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    @slice1900 is right. But if you really want 4k, I'd get a '17, get it calibrated, and get yourself an Oppo UDP-203. The LG apps are pretty darn good - I have a Roku 4k ultra that I like, but the native LG apps are great. They even have Netflix with Dolby Vision!
     
  8. Dec 30, 2017 #88 of 119
    compnurd

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    I would wait until CES. Because if LG does release a host of features that people will want. Then you will see the 17’s decline in price possibly a lot as people won’t want the 17’s anymore.
     
  9. Dec 30, 2017 #89 of 119
    je4755

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    Thank to everyone for their helpful comments and hope you all enjoy an outstanding New Year holiday!

    Evidently HDMI 2.1 underpins most, if not all, new features of interest such as HFR. Multiple websites state hardware incorporating HDMI 2.1 likely will not prove available until late 2018 or 2019. This assessment rests in part on the HDMI Forum generating compliance tests over the first three quarters of 2018, a process that apparently constitutes a necessary predicate for the shipment of HDMI 2.1 products.

    In any case, we’ll see what LG has to say at CES on January 8th.

    Another question is how rapidly DirecTV and Comcast (my other provider) will take advantage of these new technologies when they appear.

    Given I have reached my 70s, my horizon for futureproofing rapidly is contracting. Nevertheless, it now seems TVs are approaching computers in the need to upgrade every few years. I remember when purchasing a TV set was a once in a decade undertaking. The “revolutionary” advances that now occur regularly were rare events in the past, such as screens large enough not to require a magnifying glass (as occurred in the early 1950s), remote controls and color.

    BTW, I also remember horse-drawn wagons delivering milk to homes in Philly so I really am dating myself!
     
  10. Dec 30, 2017 #90 of 119
    slice1900

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    You only need to buy a new TV every couple of years if you must have every advance the moment it is available, even when there is little or no content to take advantage of it. If you bought one of the early 4K TVs, it didn't have HDMI 2.0 / HDCP 2.2 and is effectively obsolete already. If you bought one of the first HDMI 2.0 / HDCP 2.2 models you missed out on HDR so you're kicking yourself today now that Directv is starting HDR broadcasts. IMHO WCG and HDR were always the real 'must have' features that UHD would bring, much more so than the resolution. If you buy today you'll get HDR but miss out on HDMI 2.1 / HFR which in a few years will be important to anyone who watches sports.

    I can't get 4K from my cable company and don't have a 4K streaming box so I'm perfectly happy with my 1080p plasma for now. I've been waiting for HFR support because I've known all along that's the endgame when the feature list will stabilize as far as matching up with what we'll conceivably ever see in broadcasts. 8K TVs will eventually be sold - because marketers will have to have something to try to push on the sort of gullible folks who have to buy anything new - but 4K is it as far as content. Well maybe other than some tiny videophile niche the equivalent of the audiophile niche for DVD-A.
     
  11. Dec 30, 2017 #91 of 119
    seern

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    Has anyone else noticed that the hdr icon is missing from shows in the guide that D* says are being broadcast in it? I had this along with 4K in the guide up until several days ago and now it is now longer there.
     
  12. Dec 30, 2017 #92 of 119
    WestDC

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    It's Still shows up on mine -Reminder NOT all all 4k Shows in the guide are 4H +HDR -maybe that's why your not seeing it
     
  13. Dec 30, 2017 #93 of 119
    seern

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    No I am looking at the shows advertised by D* as being hdr like the Rose Parade on Monday and this band concert that has been on since last week.
     
  14. Jan 1, 2018 #94 of 119
    seern

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    Just watched the 4K HDR broadcast of the Rose Parade and the picture and colours were amazing. Because my setup has the HR54-200 and C61K going into my AVR through separate inputs, I was able to do an A - B comparison of the 4K vs HD pictures on HGTV since it was the same feed as the D* broadcast. I was able to notice a marked difference between the 2 pictures, as would be expected.
     
  15. Jan 1, 2018 #95 of 119
    RobertDeckman

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    I felt that the first hour had super-saturated colors, making it way less than amazing. Maybe it was my Vizio P65-C1.
     
  16. Jan 1, 2018 #96 of 119
    seern

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    Now that you mention it, some colours like red were really popping in the first part of the broadcast. Have to remember, a work in progress as they attempt to get it right. Thought that that music broadcast was overly dark so they are attempting to learn how to broadcast hdr.
     
  17. Jan 2, 2018 #97 of 119
    slice1900

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    Gotta remember what is being referred to as "HDR" is really two things. HDR = high dynamic range which has nothing to do with colors that "pop" more. Think of it like having a volume control that goes from 5-50 in steps of 5, and you replace it with a volume control that goes from 1-100 in steps of 1 - HDR does basically the same thing for brightness.

    The other half of HDR is WCG = wide color gamut. This is where you get colors that were impossible to display in rec.709 color map used by HD. Some HDR uses the DCI-P3 color map which is what Hollywood uses, others use the rec.2020 color map is massively expanded over DCI-P3 but is more of a "someday that'll be awesome" thing because TVs you can buy today can almost but not quite hit the whole DCI-P3 gamut, but none even in labs come remotely close to the rec.2020 gamut.

    When you have problems with stuff being overly dark, you are seeing issues with the high dynamic range part of it. Since TVs differ in maximum brightness, minimum brightness, and the number of steps between the two what the studio thinks looks good may not be what looks good on your particular TV. You may need to do some tweaking, but they are surely tweaking on their end so what looks good on one broadcast might not on the next.

    Personally I don't think high dynamic range is going to be all that useful. Think about what high dynamic range does for sound - it lets you have music where you might have a quiet whisper in some parts and very loud sounds in other parts. Many people don't want to have to strain to listen to quiet parts, or turn it up so they can hear the quiet parts and then be deafened by the loud parts. Thus most sound systems offer an option for dynamic range compression - though that's really not necessary for most modern music since producers compress the dynamic range these days (the main exception being classical) which pisses off a lot of audiophiles who want the full range.

    I personally have no interest in having dark scenes that are so dark you can't tell what is going on, and then a scene showing a sunrise that hurts my eyes because my TV is showing so much brightness (nothing like the real sun of course, but if you are watching in a darkened room having your TV go to max brightness - especially future TVs that will be able to hit much higher max brightness levels - is not going to be pleasant) So I think many will disable the high dynamic range and want only the wide color gamut. That's what makes colors pop and things look closer to real life.
     
  18. Jan 2, 2018 #98 of 119
    je4755

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    Today LG issued a lengthy press release regarding its 2018 TVs. Of particular interest is the “Alpha 9” image processor, which evidently will offer some degree of future proofing, to wit:

    “α (Alpha) 9 is ready to support next generation high frame rate (HFR) content created at 120 frames per second for better rendering of fast-action content with smoother and clearer motion such as sports and action movies.”
     
  19. Jan 3, 2018 #99 of 119
    slice1900

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    Its only future proof if the TVs include an HDMI 2.1 port. If it is HDMI 2.0 then it will never support HFR content because that can't later be upgraded to HDMI 2.1. The "ready to support generation HFR content" statement could mean that they intend to use the alpha 9 for several generations of TVs.
     
  20. Jan 3, 2018 #100 of 119
    slice1900

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    Just saw an article about LG's 2018 OLEDs. They don't have HDMI 2.1, and will NOT support HFR via HDMI as a result. They will support via the internal apps or OTA - that latter is interesting...I wonder if that means it will include an ATSC 3.0 tuner? Maybe only the models sold in South Korea will though, guess we'll find out soon enough.

    Looks like I will have to wait one more year before replacing my plasma.
     

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