4K Shmore K

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by Rob37, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. Oct 30, 2016 #1 of 119
    Rob37

    Rob37 Active Member

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    4K sucks. A buddy of mine has it and it is not all it is cracked up to be. HD is plenty viewable. 4K in my opinion is a waste. That is all.
     
  2. Oct 30, 2016 #2 of 119
    RBA

    RBA Well-Known Member

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    To each their own opinion, maybe your friend needs to replace his 4K. I am happy with mine.
     
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  3. Oct 30, 2016 #3 of 119
    dpeters11

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    Or bad settings, bad config etc. Hopefully it's not something simpler, I remember in early days at least, people on cable said they didn't get the big deal, but they weren't on the HD channel number.
     
  4. Oct 30, 2016 #4 of 119
    KyL416

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    Can you provide some detail on what you watched? Was it actual true 4K with HDR or just a player upconverting a 1080p Bluray? Or was it Netflix where unless you turn on the diagnostic display you don't know if you're watching 4K, "Super HD" or less.

    What was the screensize of the TV and was it even hooked up and configured right? Too many people get a 4K TV, hook up their 4K "capable" device, not realizing that only one of the ports on their TV support all of the HDMI and HDCP requirements, or that the HDMI ports are configurable and by default some TVs only set it to HDMI 1.4 instead of HDMI 2.0, or that they have to go into the settings of the device and manually turn on support for HDR and HDCP 2.2.
     
  5. Oct 30, 2016 #5 of 119
    dod1450

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    I just got mine yesterday and after pushing the red button on the side it did an flash update. There is no date that indicated it was today. Channel 104 has some nice videos. And the 4k icon in browse has some free documentaries. I was watching one on Van Gough. As far as the movies I am avoiding them since I have Netflix. Yes I know the movies there are not current, but I did see LukeCage in 4k.
     
  6. Oct 30, 2016 #6 of 119
    peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    I wouldn't say "it sucks" but what I would say is that is not the huge leap like when we went from SD to HD. This is like going from an iPhone 6s ti an iPhone 7 or its Android counterpart. That there is an improvement, absolutely. Is that improvement worth throwing out you good working 1080p set over it, absolutely not!


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  7. Oct 30, 2016 #7 of 119
    jwbeeler

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    Come to my house and watch a 4k HDR movie. You'll change your mind. It's not just the resolution. The WCG makes an enormous difference.
     
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  8. Oct 30, 2016 #8 of 119
    peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    I've seen it, many times with HDR as well, that was taken in consideration when I posted my opinion on my last post. Yes, there is a difference but not enough to make me throw away my good 1080p set, specially given the state of 4K content right now.
     
  9. Oct 30, 2016 #9 of 119
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    While the garbage in, garbage out rule applies the upscaling ability of a 4K Ultra HDTV makes it worth the investment. DVDs, Blu-rays and broadcast content all look much better when upscaled on a 4K Ultra HDTV. 4K content is the cherry on top of the icing. It would help us understand your opinion if you provide more information (TV Brand, Settings, Connected Equipment, Content Source).
     
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  10. Oct 31, 2016 #10 of 119
    fleckrj

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    I definitely would not replace my 1080p Panny plasma for any 4K set that I have seen so far. I have a 4K Samsung LED, but there is not enough 4K content available. For what is available on linear channels - especially the sports channels, the old HD Panny blows the 4K Samsung out of the water. If ESPN and the SEC Network go to 4K, I might change my mind, but right now, nothing beats a good plasma TV for fast action.

    When the Panny dies, I will replace it with a 4K set. If that happens this year, it will probably be with a LG OLED, but I expect better choices will come in the future if 4K becomes mainstream. It would not surprise me, though, to see 4K go the way of 3D. Yes, there is a difference, but the difference is not big enough to matter for 98% of home viewing. This is nothing like the change from B&W to color (and yes, I am old enough to remember when color was a novelty), nor is it as big as the change from SD to HD. 4K is an incremental improvement that cannot be seen by most viewers.
     
  11. Oct 31, 2016 #11 of 119
    Gordon Shumway

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    That is the key right there. I probably wouldn't have upgraded to 4K if my almost 10 year old HD set wasn't starting to look dull. Just couldn't brighten it up any longer w/o messing up some other aspect of the picture. I made the decision on what 4K TV to get based solely on its ability to upconvert HD, and I am extremely glad I did. The TV does a really good job upconverting, and improving the picture. Live sports are a stunning improvement over my older HDTV. I also didn't throw the old TV away. Just moved it into my office/junk room where it works just fine for its intended purpose.

    I got a Samsung SUHD TV that is much further up the quality food chain than my old Sony.was at the time. A 33% bigger screen at 65% of the cost of the old one. Seems like a win to me.

    Interestingly, the new HDTV's for sale are also a marked improvement over older ones, but it just didn't make any sense to not get a 4K for the price difference.
     
  12. Oct 31, 2016 #12 of 119
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Plasmas had their heyday with their superior picture quality over LCD but suffered two flaws, burn in issues and picture glare. Like you I'm old enough to remember the intro of color TVs and the best way to describe them was awesome. Everybody wanted one. Only problem was there wasn't a lot of color content available when they were introduced. If memory serves me the networks didn't go full color until the early 1970s. But color TVs did become the norm. Today we're seeing the same thing, the intro of 4K TVs with not a lot of 4k content availability. That content availability is going to improve at a faster pace than color content availability for the early color TVs and though the picture quality isn't as dramatic as the change from SD to HD was I still see 4K eventually becoming the norm and not going the way of 3D.

    I strongly feel if the manufacturers marketed the 4K sets with more emphasis on their upscaling ability they'd sell a lot more sets. A few weeks ago I was watching the Tom Selleck version of "Monte Walsh" on DVD. My neighbor came over for a visit and when he saw what I was watching he asked me when they released the Blu-ray. The upscaling is that good!
     
  13. Oct 31, 2016 #13 of 119
    jimmie57

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    My niece's husband recently bought a 65" Sony 4k with HDR, etc. He hated it, said it was not as good as his old Samsung 1080p and he promptly took it back to the store.
    The next day he bought an almost top of the line 65" Samsung model 9000. He said it was not as good as the old 1080p tv but better than the Sony.
    I talked to her and told her that the pictures have to be adjusted to your personal preference and that it is impossible to do that in an hour or 2. I suggested several settings to look at and to adjust. Have no fear because at the bottom of the list is a reset choice to put it back to factory specs.
    A couple of days later she told me that he has been adjusting it for the last 2 days and it is Awesome now.
     
  14. Oct 31, 2016 #14 of 119
    slice1900

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    True burn in was only a problem on plasmas the first few years they were out. Everything made since the mid 2000s at least had no burn in issues, but they did have image retention. So yeah, you could see the outline of ESPN's ticker on it if you had ESPN on it a lot, but if you played other stuff it would fade away. And guess what, LCD/LED TVs suffer exactly the same image retention problem. Even OLED TVs suffer image retention. I'm not sure there is a way around it, at least not a cheap one, because it has been with us since the CRT days and every new type of TV still experiences it.

    The glare is an issue with any glass screen. LCDs did away with the problem by using plastic so they could have a matte screen. There are anti-reflectance treatments they can use for glass but they're kind of pricey for something the size of a modern TV. Apple uses them on their latest iPads, if you compare one of those to one from a couple years earlier that doesn't have the special coating you can really see the difference.
     
  15. Oct 31, 2016 #15 of 119
    inkahauts

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    Did you get a samsungs that's HDR and claims at least 240 thereby being an actual 120 refresh? Or did you get one saying 120 which means it's actually only 60.
     
  16. Oct 31, 2016 #16 of 119
    jimmie57

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    4k is not going away like 3D. Go to some of the websites of the manufacturers and look at what they are making. They are only making different grades of 4k capable TVs.
    Look here for example. Nothing but older models that are still available. The new ones like the 4k show ( 2016 model ). None of the 1080p TVs show this. http://www.samsung.com/us/televisions-home-theater/tvs/full-hd-tvs/s/_/n-10+11+hv1uh+zq204
     
  17. Oct 31, 2016 #17 of 119
    peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    when folks say that 4K may go the way of 3D, they don't mean that manufactures would actually stopped marking 4K sets, of course they will keep making those sets, they don't care of content is there is or not. They just want to sell TVs. As a matter of fact manufacturers are still making 3D sets even tho there is notuxh to watch on 3D. What fols actually mean is that they content will not come and a few years down the road something else will take its place as the new news worthy technology to talk about.


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  18. Oct 31, 2016 #18 of 119
    WestDC

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    For Me -When 4K becomes as HD is today - I may make the move - For you and others Enjoy the wait!
     
  19. Nov 1, 2016 #19 of 119
    inkahauts

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    In a few years, there wont be any tvs available that are not 4k.... That will do it for everyone eventually.
     
  20. Nov 1, 2016 #20 of 119
    fleckrj

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    And that is why I had two 3D TVs (one of those has since died, and its replacement is 4K, but not 3D). At the time I purchased them, all of the large Panasonic plasma TVs included 3D. Even though most large TVs sold at the time were 3D, that was not enough to make 3D catch on.

    I think the bandwidth overhead required for 4K might be what prevents 4K from becoming mainstream. There might be 10 to 20 4K channels at some point, but I do not see the broadcast networks moving to 4K, nor do I see mainstream channels such as USA, TNT, TBS, Food Network, HGTV, TLC, Discovery, et. al. moving to 4K. Some of the sports channels, some of the movie channels, and a few niche channels (possibly Smithsonian and a few others) will be in 4K, but there will not be much more than that.
     

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