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5 LNB dish and HR20 install questions

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by ngoldenm, Sep 5, 2007.

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  1. Sep 5, 2007 #1 of 14
    ngoldenm

    ngoldenm Cool Member

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    Hi all. If this has been posted elsewhere, I'm sorry. I tried searching but couldn't find what I wanted.

    I'm looking to upgrade to HD in the very near future. I'll be getting the 5 LNB dish and HR20 receiver. I'll be doing the install myself. I know that the 5 LNB has 4 wires coming from it, correct? If so, what do I need to wire the dish to my HR20 and receive all the programming? Are there any converters, switches, etc that I need to get as well? I'll only be hooking up the one sat box. I know that you have to plug in two wires into the back of the HR20. How many of the wires coming from the dish do I need to run inside? Is there any specific type of cable that I need to use? Getting the wires, however many of them, inside is not an issue.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Sep 5, 2007 #2 of 14
    HolyRoses

    HolyRoses Mentor

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    You should use RG6 cable that is solid copper core. Eagle Aspen 39B2 is a good choice. You also should use compression style fitting, thomas & betts fittings are popular. You should run all 4 leads into the house to a single point. From that point you should run to the receivers in your house. If you find you need more than 4 leads you will need to get a multiswitch like the Zinwell wb68. You will need to run 2 lines to the receiver.

    -HR
     
  3. Sep 5, 2007 #3 of 14
    bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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  4. Sep 5, 2007 #4 of 14
    djr

    djr DBSTalk Club Member

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    Don't forget to run all 4 wires through a grounding block and ground the grounding block.
    You can search for posts on proper grounding.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2007 #5 of 14
    ngoldenm

    ngoldenm Cool Member

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    So, I only need to run two cables from the dish to the HR20? Which means I only need to run two cables to the inside of the house? Do I even have to hook up the other cables to the dish or do I just have to hook up the two that I need to run to the HR20?

    Can I get the RG6 cable at Lowes or other similar hardware stores or is it something that I have to get from a specialty shop/internet?

    Thanks for the links bobnielsen. They'll help a lot I'm sure.
    Thanks all for putting up with my questions.
     
  6. Sep 6, 2007 #6 of 14
    HolyRoses

    HolyRoses Mentor

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    You can get RG6 cable at any big home improvement store like home depot, menards, lowes. However it will be difficult to determine if its copper clad steel cable or solid bare copper cable.

    You only need the 2 runs, but I do advise bringing all 4 inside the house. Save yourself trouble in the long run if you ever decide to setup more or the next home owner even.

    -HR
     
  7. Sep 6, 2007 #7 of 14
    carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    I'm curious as to why you want to do the install yourself. Unless you are fairly experienced, alignment of the 5-LNB dish can be a challenge. Why not let DirecTV do the work?

    Carl
     
  8. Sep 6, 2007 #8 of 14
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The big concern with buying things over the Internet is that the shipping charges can be more than the cost of the cable.

    Look for cable that does NOT have "CCS" in the model number or part number. CCS is a popular abbreviation of Copper Clad Steel which is recommended against. I suggest getting the cable at a local supply so you can determine that it is swept to at least 2250MHz (this will be printed on the cable jacket) and has a solid copper core. If you can't get into a box or reel, the home improvement stores will often have an open reel for cut lengths that you can inspect.

    I would go with the free installation unless you are planning something that is in violation of the subscriber agreement. Doing it yourself will cost a lot and there's nobody to fall back on if it doesn't go well. Understand that it must work and you must activate the receiver within 30 days or you may be charged $150 for failure to activate. Know also that you will not avoid the two year programming commitment by self-installing.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2007 #9 of 14
    ngoldenm

    ngoldenm Cool Member

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    The reason that I'm doing the install myself is because the local directv installer (actually any vehicle with directv on the side is enough for them) is no longer welcome in my apartment complex. they've had to many discrepencies (sp?) in the past regarding the installers not doing the installations per the rules. They do still allow us to have satellite but you must do it yourself and they must approve of the way you plan to install it beforehand. That's why i'm trying to figure all of this out now.

    How difficult is it to aim this dish, as compared to say a regular (single lnb I believe) dish? can you still do it using the onscreen satellite signal strength meter off the box? are there any directions that tell how to do this? I haven't gotten a chance to watch those videos yet. I'm at work but I plan on watching them as soon as I get home.

    Thanks for all the help guys.
     
  10. HolyRoses

    HolyRoses Mentor

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    Aug 11, 2007
    you can do it if you have the patience and skill. I highly suggest using a signal meter. A $10-12 inline analog signal meter will work just fine. It is what I used and i have 95 signal on the KA beams.

    -HR
     
  11. ngoldenm

    ngoldenm Cool Member

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    Sep 5, 2007
    Where can I find an analog inline signal meter? The signal meter listed in the link above is very expensive. Thanks a ton.

    EDIT: One more question. Since I will not be using a multiswitch, do I need to put a B-band converter inline at the receiver? If so, does it come with the dish or do I need to get one of those too?
     
  12. HolyRoses

    HolyRoses Mentor

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    Mine looks just like this for the most part http://cgi.ebay.com/SF-95-SATELLITE...ryZ11726QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    Your hr20 should come with 2 bbc connectors. You will need them installed.

    To use the meter make a pigtail to the LNB, then to the meter, then to your directv receiver. I'd place the directv receiver in a place where you can view the tv, just for further confirmation. The analog meter is a LOT more responsive than the signal meter from the receiver.

    -HR
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Check the installation videos at this link.

    http://www.solidsignal.com/satellite/at9_install_videos.asp

    As to a meter, I would recommend either the Accutrac Pro 22 or the Accutrac III. I would recommend getting more than the very basic meter, as part of the alignment process is selecting either 101 or 119 satellite, and the low end meters won't allow you to do that.

    Carl
     
  14. HolyRoses

    HolyRoses Mentor

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    Aug 11, 2007
    you can test 119 by changing the channel on the IRD. It informs you how to do that in the installation manual on solidsignal.com.

    -HR
     
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