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Adding a show from NOMAD while traveling.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by likegadgets, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Exactly the point...the Nomad client software is not LOOKING for an off-LAN address, it is ONLY looking at local addresses.
     
  2. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Because the nomad client software is homed on the same subnet, it won't look to the VPN.
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    It seems like you're off by a couple orders of magnitude on your file size estimates. 400GB is also well over most bandwidth caps.
     
  4. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Yes, we are in violent agreement. :)

    The only possible way to get a Nomad to work over a VPN would be to have the VPN server at the remote location and open a session FROM the Nomad's network to the remote location - not too practical.
     
  5. markrogo

    markrogo Godfather

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    I meant 400MB (vs. about 680MB per hour for Nomad). Based on the quality complaints about Nomad files on iPads and the few torrents we have run on our HDTV in the living room; I'd guess the average torrent looks more than a bit better as well.
     
  6. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

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    Where have you seen complaints about the videos on iPads from Nomad? I think they look great. The only complaints I have heard have been from people using laptop or desktop computers with much bigger screens.

    Sure Torrents are going to look better in some cases, but they are going to be much larger files, and you have to deal with going out and finding them, downloading them, and hoping you don't end up with Viruses etc. Not to mention it is technically illegal.

    Finally, once again torrents, like streaming, require a good high speed internet connection. That is not something everybody has. I can't be downloading a bunch of movies from torrents on my HughesNet satellite internet, but it works just fine for letting me set up and access Nomad. I'm also really annoyed by all these movie companies starting to make you download the digital copies you get with your Blu-Ray instead of just including them on a disc. I end up having to set my alarm for 1am and 6am to start and stop downloading them overnight in the free download zone, and it takes 2 or 3 nights per movie a lot of the time. It really sucks.
     
  7. markrogo

    markrogo Godfather

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    Here, on DBSTalk. Specifically asking if the native iPad client would have higher resolution/bitrate because the files don't look very good. Feel free to run the search if you don't believe me, the posts are here.
    So just to clarify:

    1) They are smaller files, not larger files. Torrent files are typically 400MB per hour is smaller than Nomad files which are -- according to reports here -- 680MB here.

    2) They take about 20 seconds to locate in Google and begin downloading. Aside from the fact that directly VPNing doesn't even work, all the workaround solutions involve transferring a Nomad file to another computer in your home and then copying that out. There is no way you are going to get that started in less time than someone is going to start a torrent download.

    3) I only torrent under the following circumstances: I have set a recording on my DVR and for whatever reason, it's not accessible. That could be file corruption, DVR failure, DirecTV's highly contentious relationship between our local CW affiliate and the current generation of DVRs, whanot. Otherwise, I simply don't do it. That said, with standard virus protection running, I've never seen a video file with a virus. Could it happen? Sure. Has it happened? Not to me.

    4) Yes, it's technically illegal. Circumventing the restrictions on downloading content from Nomad to your device outside your home is probably also technically illegal under DMCA. I'm not a lawyer and not playing one on TV.

    The discussion here was about "adding something from Nomad when away from home". And I'm merely noting that since that doesn't appear to work in any way that's not very convoluted -- you need to log into your home network, cause the transfer to occur, get the file to your remote device, and then, apparently, it will work -- there is an alternative. Given that you have bothered to record the program in either case, the gray area here is awfully murky. I would never tell anyone to download a recently released film from the internet. To me, that's clearly wrong. To download a copy of a show you have already DVRed on the other hand? Well, I'm struggling with wagging the copyright law finger at you.
    This is perhaps true of satellite connections, but that doesn't really apply to any real situation involving "away from home" short of a cabin in the woods or a boat or equivalent. Otherwise, who uses HughesNet. Any other connection that lets you download files that are Nomad transcoded can easily handle torrents, which often download far faster thanks to source-server diversity. Since the torrent files are barely more than half the size, a challenged connection will find them that much more appealing. It is true that satellite internet is unique on the upstream side and torrent downloads do benefit a bit by having access to some upstream bandwidth, but, again, we are talking downloads away from home. I'm really not sure how this applies for 99% of people.

    Yes, it's idiotic. So is UltraViolet, a great idea, except they got no buy in from Amazon or Apple -- the largest sources of paid movie downloads. Hollywood is trying, but still doesn't quite get it. The downloadable digital copies you are suffering with are a perfect example. At that point, you are honestly better off with a DRM-free illegal copy. And, honestly, too often people I know justify illegal copying because it works better than the legal solutions. I'm not one of those people, but I understand where they are coming from.
     
  8. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

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    The only posts I have seen here like that are about the UI itself. Since there is no iPad app currently you have to run the iPhone app on it scaled up and it doesn't look good. However, once you start playing a file it switches over the the iPads video player app and the actual video file looks very good. I haven't seen any complaints about the video files looking bad on iPads, only computers. I'm pretty sure digital copies that come with Blu-rays/DVDs are also only 720x480 and they look about the same, maybe a little better because they usually take up about 800-900 MB/hour.

    How is a torrent file with higher resolution going to be a smaller file. I don't buy that at all.

    The last time I messed with torrents you had to go to specifit sites, use BitTorrent or something like that to download a .zip or .rar file, and then by the time you got it downloaded and unzipped you found out it wasn't really the video you were looking for, or it was a virus. Maybe stuff is better in that respect now.

    I was just pointing out that normally they don't like people here suggesting others do something illegal or against DirecTV's terms of service. That's one reason I'm suprised this thread has stuck around, I figured trying this has to be close to both if not at least against DirecTV's TOS. I don't think there is going to be any way to transfer these shows outside your home.

    Really? Away from home is where most people are going to lack high speed internet. WiFi isn't free everywhere and not everyone has 3G enabled devices, or 3G service available. And yes a lot of people use HughesNet including myself because it is the only high speed internet availabe. Not everyone lives in town or close to town.


    Don't get me started on UltraViolet. I still haven't figured out how to get them on my computer and into my iPhone/iPad. Do they integrate into itunes after you have them downloaded or does it have to use the stupid Ultraviolet program on my computer to transfer it somehow? I may very well end up giving up on those movies, I don't want to have to deal with looking for my movies in different apps/etc. I'm already dealing with that because these channel providers have all deciced they want to have their own apps for each of their channels streaming sites (I have to have seperate apps for HBO, Cinemax, TBS, TNT, etc. right now and that's annoying).
     
  9. markrogo

    markrogo Godfather

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    There are, in fact, complaints about the video quality.

    Here's a left-handed compliment: http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=2880439#post2880439

    This post specifically notes the small screens mask the bad quality: http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=2876011#post2876011

    These are not the only posts, but really feel free to run your own searches. I've read all the threads, there are complaints about the quality.

    Resolution is one small part of video quality. Bitrate is a larger past. Encoding is a critical part -- see below.
    Encoding quality. Period. I'm sorry you don't buy it. It's fact. You can have a 4 megabit/second file that looks better than a 10 megabit/second file if the encoding is appreciably better. Nomad has presumably a dedicated hardware encoder (perhaps as part of an SoC) that is probably running a single pass with relatively "light" software setting as befits a $150 device. If I have a modern PC with a modern graphics card and my goal is to make a great 400MB/hour file from a broadcast HDTV source at 19 megabits/second (which is available for most OTA TV), I can easily obliterate the quality of Nomad using approximately half the bits.

    I don't know if you ever play with BluRay rips or not, but you should try using some encoders to make 4 megabit/second rips sometime and compare those to DirecTV broadcasts. The bitrates and resolution are comparable; the visuals are not. I no longer debate facts with people. Encoding quality matters. If you need help finding sources, I'll help you run searches. If you wish to debate whether it's true, I won't be partaking.
    The way it works now:

    1) Find season/episode number, e.g. you just missed an episode of Family Guy (I use epguides.com to find this info for the episode number corresponding to what I'd need.)

    2) Type Family Guy S10e02 into Google. (or whatever show name and episode code where it's season number, followed by episode number). One of the first 2 links contains a tracker. Click on that to "download" tracker. Takes 5 seconds. Open tracker, it adds to torrent client.

    3) Wait 20-30 minutes typically, open file with VLC or equivalent. There are no viruses, no bogus files, etc. Google really takes care of that by having only the most popular links atop the search results.

    Again, I'm not advocating this, but I believe most anyone can manage this (if I can, you can).
    Nor do I. But perhaps streaming will be allowed at some point, a la Slingbox.
    See this is where your point which valid is not relevant. If you don't have high speed, you aren't adding something from Nomad. You can't have this argument both ways: Either this is no/limited connectivity, in which case you can't add from Nomad regardless of legal/technical limitations. Or there is decent connectivity, in which case, the quasi-legal/morally questionable torrent method is 100% as viable as the Nomad method. Actually, it's close to 200% as viable since the files would take less time to load. Perhaps it's 1000% more viable in that you can do it, whereas the Nomad simply doesn't allow this. The one "known" workaround is very complex.

    I'm pretty sure it's a world unto itself. Dumb and dumber. I buy my movies on BluRay. If I want them on other devices, I rip them to hard drive. The movie industry doesn't care for this, but refuses to provide a solution that is as good or reliable. Hint: DRM needs to be invisible or non-existent; once it starts breaking stuff, we're out.

    Yes, welcome to the "future" where we have dozens of separate apps with unique UIs to watch TV. How is this good exactly? Oh. right, it isn't. At least HBO Go is well done. I've heard decent things about ESPN's app, but we can't use it on DirecTV. Oh well.
     
  10. jfulcher

    jfulcher Mentor

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    Jun 5, 2007
    Why doesn't it work? How does Nomad know you aren't physically on the same network?

    Nevermind, I read more.
     

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