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Anachronisms?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Apr 1, 2011 #121 of 203
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    "children should be seen but not heard". :lol:
     
  2. Apr 3, 2011 #122 of 203
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    On the analog clock thing...

    I know how to read clocks... and if I had kids I would most likely teach them to do so as well... but it is hard to argue that it is a necessary skill anymore.

    One could just as easily argue that we should all be able to make fire from two sticks... but I suspect most of us cannot do so if put on the spot to do it.

    I also don't know how to ride a horse, or hitch a horse to a carriage... and lots of other things that arguably time has passed by with modern improvements that reduce the need to know how to do it the old way.
     
  3. Apr 3, 2011 #123 of 203
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I started this thread because of the article my wife saw about everyday things becoming anachronisms. It stuck in my mind that it mentioned watches.

    I really like clocks for some reason. Both digital and analog. I've used digital watches since Texas Instruments was selling the watches you had to press a button to see the red readout. Now I've got an analog watch. I got kinda tired of digital watches. But to see them go extinct? I dunno. That seems like we'd be losing something.

    Rich
     
  4. Apr 4, 2011 #124 of 203
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I can see the feeling of nostalgia...

    but not too many people are nostalgic over the old washing boards instead of a washing machine.

    More recently, not too many people are agonizing over the loss of the traditional typewriter or typesetting equipment in favor of modern computers.

    Most seem to like electronic ignition instead of the old hand crank to start your car...

    And very few complain about having central air instead of having to wave a fan at your face manually...

    We all have things that we are nostalgic about... and that's certainly a fair point. I like analog watches/clocks myself even though I currently do not own a watch or even a clock that isn't part of some other computer component.

    But the loss of the "skill" of reading an analog clock isn't exactly going to ruin the world. Clock-wise is a semi-arbitrary thing anyway... and there are analog clocks that run the opposite way on purpose you can get in novelty shops.
     
  5. Apr 4, 2011 #125 of 203
    AttiTech

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    We weren't allowed calculators in class unless we were using them for sin, cosin ect ect. Other than that, we were docked points on each question we didn't show our written work on (in full). I've always enjoyed doing math so for me it was no big deal, but some of my friends had a whole mess of points taken away :lol:
     
  6. Apr 4, 2011 #126 of 203
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I can remember my grandmother and my great aunts using wash boards. Then Gram got a wringer washing machine. That was quite dangerous and they faded away quickly.

    Most electric clocks will run backwards (I'm talking about the clocks you plug into a receptacle.) if they start up with the rotor in a certain position (they all used "universal" motors which are DC motors that work with AC. We used to have to go around our plant and unplug all the wall clocks that were running backwards after a plant-wide shutdown of power. Didn't happen to all of them, but it did happen.

    Rich
     
  7. Apr 4, 2011 #127 of 203
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I would have gone to college if I could have used a calculator in grammar school and high school.

    Rich
     
  8. Apr 4, 2011 #128 of 203
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I hated showing my work. I felt that RESULTS should speak louder than how I got there ... and when I had a faster route to the answer I got tired of going around the block just to satisfy the ego of the teachers/system that were trying to teach me by rote.

    That kind of "three lefts make a right" learning annoys me. Why can't I just turn right? We all get the same place. Getting marked down for not taking three lefts to get there is just mean. I rarely got a good answer to the question of "why do I need to know it this way". The response was usually some abuse of authority based "because I say so".

    When I got into the "real world" outside of education no one cared that I didn't take three lefts. Some actually considered me brilliant because I took a right. Without a calculator.
     
  9. Apr 4, 2011 #129 of 203
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    Yes, but surely you used a GPS!! :) Or a map and compass....

    Showing work was occasionally illustrative in the teaching part, but I was under the impression that on tests it was more a preventative from copying "X=42" from one's neighbor... but it surely was annoying.
     
  10. Apr 4, 2011 #130 of 203
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    In math, I simply got the "right" answer instead of the "three left" answer. No need to reward inefficiency.

    I do have a GPS which comes in handy for estimating arrival times. I suppose I could memorize how long it takes to get from community to community and do the math but I am reminded about something Einstein said about not knowing the number of feet in a mile: "I don't know, why should I fill my brain with facts I can find in two minutes in any standard reference book ?"

    I keep that fact in my head, but I probably use the number of feet in a mile more than Einstein did.

    Everyone is a cheat until proven otherwise. Another thing I didn't like about school. Fortunately my neighbors got more answers wrong than I did so it wasn't much of an issue. :D
     
  11. Apr 4, 2011 #131 of 203
    jeffshoaf

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    Hmmm... What kind of class was this? :rolleyes:
     
  12. Apr 5, 2011 #132 of 203
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The answer, of course, is that you have to show your work to prove you actually understand how to solve the problem... as opposed to cheating.

    That said...

    I often skipped steps in my head so I didn't show as much work as the teacher did.

    I also forced my college professors to have multiple answer keys with any problems that involved trigonometry, because invariably my trig-substitutions were different than the teacher's default solution... so they had to be prepared with the multiple correct answers to such problems since they knew I could prove my solution was equally valid. :)
     
  13. Apr 5, 2011 #133 of 203
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Actually they tell worse time. I adjust mine once a month or so.

    But, it is almost 20 years old and looks almost as good as it did when it was new and I could sell it now for more than I paid for it.
     
  14. Apr 5, 2011 #134 of 203
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    I had a college professor (finance) that had the perfect solution. If you wanted to use a financial calculator, fine go ahead and just put down the answer. If you get it correct, you get full credit, if you get it wrong, you get a zero for that question. But if you show your work, and all steps are correct, but you make a math error, you can still get 90% credit if you did all the right steps.

    I have to get on my daughter for trying to use her iPod touch calculator to do her math homework. That thing is so flakey with the touch that you really never know what you are inputting. It is fine for a quick calculation on the go, but not as a sit down calculator.
     
  15. Apr 5, 2011 #135 of 203
    Rich

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    I don't get the Rolex line of watches. Aside from the status of being able to afford one, what is the advantage? My lawyer bought a new one and he almost needed a sling to hold his arm up, it was so bulky. I don't get having a quarter inch thick watch on your wrist. I also don't get having the band so loose the watch constantly is flopping about.

    I also don't understand why anyone would pay a small fortune for watches with no time indicators on them, just the minute hand and the hour hand.

    Rich
     
  16. Apr 5, 2011 #136 of 203
    AttiTech

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    :lol: Every Algebra class I took in High School. We were allowed them in Pre-Calc and Calc, but everyone who joined me in those classes had the no calculator bit drilled so far into their heads from the Algebra teachers we had before those that we hardly used them. As for showing our work, I thought it was kind of pointless as well. After they showed us how to do the work, it wasn't that difficult so most of it could be done without a calculator and in your head.

    -Atticus
     
  17. Apr 5, 2011 #137 of 203
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    They are, at least the SS Submariner, very durable. Like I said, this thing is almost 20 years old and there is not even a scratch on the crystal and very few on the bracelet. Yes it can be bulky, but I am not a small guy and after a while you don't even notice it. And I like it loose. Can't stand something tight on my wrist.

    And like you, other than a plain wedding band, I have no other jewlery. So I probably have less invested in a watch than some guys with multiple chains, bracelets and rings. Plus I only need to have one. My neighbor has like 3-4 watches. One for dress, one for casual, another this and that. Mine works with a tux at a dinner function or with camo out shooting deer.:)
     
  18. Apr 5, 2011 #138 of 203
    Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Actually, they are still around, having a resurgence with the green movement.
    Maytag started manufacturing wringer washers around 1910 and they were sill popular as late as 1955. I'm not certain as to who is manufacturing them today.

    As to safety, yup! My sister caught her left hand in the wringer of an old Horton wringer washer while feeding an item into it. It didn't have a safety release, so her only option was to reverse the wringer and run it back out. Ouch! :eek2:
     
  19. Apr 5, 2011 #139 of 203
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Those machines simply looked ominous. Ours was replaced by a centifruge mounted on a concrete base poured into the basement floor.
     
  20. Apr 5, 2011 #140 of 203
    Rich

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    Whatever trips your trigger.....:lol:

    Rich
     

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