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Analog to Digital: Broadcasters Date

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by Dave, Jul 13, 2005.

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  1. Dave

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    In the USA Today newspaper on Wednesday July 13, 2005, in the Money section, the Nations Broadcasters have told Congress they will agree to go all Digital by 2009. Thereby giving up there Analog Stations forever. Now lets see if Congress can work with that and make it happen.
     
  2. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Indian...
    Isn't that just special? :icon_lame The broacasters will "agree" to go digital by 2009! That's only 3 years after the current FCC stipulation, which we all know was due to change.
    To me, there's one valid reason for this extension: many broadcasters purchased low power digital transmitters with the understanding that they'd get full credit on those transmitters from the manufacturer when they traded up to high power transmitter. That was a good idea, until the manufacturer went belly up. Now they're in posession of electronic boat anchors. I guess I feel for them, not knowing the full story.
    In the state of New York, the number of DTV stations currently licensed (as opposed to those operating under temporary authority) is disgraceful. According to the FCC, as of June, 2005, New York City has only two (WCBS and WNYW),with five operating under temporary authority; my area has NONE (four operating under temporary authority at low power). OTOH, the Charlotte DMA, where I'll be moving in a few months, has SEVEN stations, all licensed!
     
  3. Paul Secic

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    I watched part of the hearing last night, and the chairman had a hard time understang the technical aspects of digital transition. Some Rep from Iowa. Heck I knew more then he did, & I don't know much. This has to do more with first responders needing more bandwith. I came away with more knowledge. They should have kept the present date 2006.
     
  4. kenglish

    kenglish Icon

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    Broadcasters would switch TODAY.....
    If people would buy the receivers!
     
  5. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Indian...
    Wrong! Broadcasters are reluctant to spend the money, just as the general public is reluctant to spend the money. The problem here is twofold: Although most broadcasters have equipment in place for digital transmission, they don't have the equipment necessary for ORIGINATING digital programming. In addition, most broadcasters are operating at low power under temporary authority. They don't have the necessary high power transmitters and antennas in place. There are some bright spots around the country where the locals are operating at full power, but they are still in the minority. As of June 2, 698 stations were either licensed or operating under Official Program Test Authority. 810 stations were operating (at low power) with Active Special Test Authorities. For more information, see http://www.fcc.gov/mb/video/dtvstatus.html

    OTOH, I was at the local Sam's Club yesterday, and they had a 27 inch Sylvania DIGITAL TV prominently displayed near the entrance at a price of $299 if I remember correctly. Not an HD TV, mind you, but it has an ATSC tuner built in.
    Now that's a smart idea! :grin:
     
  6. Bill R

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    Why should the American public be pushed into something that they don't need or want and something that is going to cost them a LOT of money? I am all for new technology (I am an engineer) but digital TV is something that the government should let the people decide when they want it. It is really going to be just another way that the rich broadcasters will get richer. Some examples: Within a few years just about every broadcaster is going to have a full time shopping channel on one of their sub channels and/or many of them are planning some sort of pay service.

    Yes, the picture will be better but the cost (to the public) does NOT justify forcing them to adapt it.
     
  7. Link

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    I guess with losing the analog broadcast of channel 6, we will no longer get their audio on 87.7 on the FM dial when they go digital. That stinks.
     
  8. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Bill R: Using your logic, they never should have changed the FM Broadcast band, never should have introduced FM Stereo or 4 track audio tapes and should have kept the CBS color TV system instead of changing to the NTSC system. They also should not have eliminated leaded gasoline. Progress comes at a price.
    The cost to the public is going to be nowhere near as high as originally predicted.
     
  9. Paul Secic

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    I agree there will be shopping channels pumping billions to broadcasters. Lucky for me I have E & three six years old TVS which will probably last til 2013 or so. Then & only then will I buy HD.
     
  10. Bill R

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    What are you, a politician? I never said ANYTHING like that nor is that my "logic". I hate people like you that take one's words and twist them to make the person seem anti-tech. You have no idea of my background and all the new technology (like the 911 emergency system) they I helped develop and implement. Don't twist my posts and add your distorted sense of what you think I mean.

    You have no idea of what you are talking about when it come to the cost to the American public to get digital TV. The cost is in the BILLIONS and that money could be better spent elsewhere.

    Digital TV should come in as the public demands (or volunteerly adopts) it. It is something that should NOT be forced on the public (which is exactly what the government is doing).
     
  11. PHL

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    I think you conveniently forget that once the transition is complete, the current spectrum allocated for analog transmission will become available for other uses. The FCC intends to auction off the frequencies and I've seen estimates of $50-100 billion that would go into the federal treasury. So really, there is very little cost to "the public". And who knows what those frequencies could be used for. They will likely spawn entire new industries that create jobs and pay taxes, so again, the "public" may actually profit from the transition, on top of the spectrum auction.

    Now, for Joe Citizen, who has analog-only televisions *AND* does not subscribe to cable or satellite, there would be a cost for upgrading their current sets. That's the whole crux of the matter: poor people who cannot afford a $50-100 ATSC set-top box. That's the primary reason that the transition date was extended to 2009. If you have cable or satellite, and you want to keep using your analog set, THE TRANSITION HAS NO EFFECT ON YOU!!!!! Otherwise, maybe you ought to reconsider that old 13" set in the garage that you've had since the Carter administration.

    By the way, judging by the boom in HDTV sales, I'd say the public *is* demanding digital TV. I definitely want it. Can't afford the HDTV set that I want right now, but that's a whole 'nother issue. I actually wish that the transition had not been extended. The quicker the transition comes, the more digital and HDTV sets are produced, and the lower the prices get. The primary reason that electronics companies haven't stopped making analog sets is because of uncertainty that the transition would actually take place. They've been hedging their bets.
     
  12. PHL

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    Exactly!!! You don't have to switch, because you aren't receiving signals off-the-air.

    Chances are that at least one or two of those TVs will survive well past 2013. I also wouldn't be surprised if you relented well before 2013 and bought an HD set. A lot can happen in 8 years. My guess is that the cost of HD sets will approach the cost of today's standard def sets within 4 years (in real dollars). In 6 years, I'm pretty sure that you will not be able to buy a new SD set at any cost (unless you travel outside the country, maybe). Ever see a monochrome VGA monitor for sale anywhere recently? Within 10 years, the CRT itself may become obsolete.
     
  13. Paul Secic

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    I'm in a wheelchair with Cerebral Palsly and have Social Security, so I can't relent. I've seen HD sets in stores and they're cool, but I'll have to settle for digital. The cut off date for not making CRT analog sets over 25" was July 1st.
     
  14. Bill R

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  15. ADent

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    1) How much is a VCR (or DVD recorder) going to cost is 2009? They are required to have ATSC tuners by then.

    2) I hope they don't move it out again. It looks like we will never get new antennas built here (Denver), so one day full power NTSC, the next full power ATSC. If 2009 holds we have only 4 more years until we get the big 3 in full power!
     
  16. Marvin

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    Making all CRT analog sets have digital tuners by 03/06 only means that this holiday season, you'll see the remaining CRT sets going for rediculously low prices because stores like Wal Mart who still carry more analog than digital sets will have to clear them out (and what better time to do it than the holidays?). Joe Average Consumer will see a brand new 35 inch TV for under $300 and wonder why they should spend up to 10x that for the same sized digital TV. Never mind that in 3 years it won't pick up any analog signals because he doesn't use it for OTA.
     
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