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Another tailgate-er needs help

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by BBD1970, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. BBD1970

    BBD1970 New Member

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    Sep 12, 2013
    Pittsburgh, TX
    Long story short.

    At the game--5 guys,all with opinions. (30 opinions what was wrong with the setup)
    --2 dishes, AU9 and a SL3S4R2-01.
    (My box. DTV-H-21-200. ( works at home) Home dish is a 3 head slimline with one out. 29 volt inserter at home)
    We have---Tripod mount. 29 volt inserter. Dish cable to-- power to swm-- Signal to ird cable to receiver.
    SL3 has one out which we tried. AU9 has 4 out which we tried.
    I -we-tried both dishes. Used dishpointer .com for Az and elevation, checked with compass, all square--was registering good signal strength on the meter.

    error code - cannot find dish.( forget the number 7??)

    Well, we took beer and bar-b-que to the guys next to us and watched their tv.

    Brought it home to the driveway. same results. Have been reading forums for 2 hours.

    This use to be alot easier.

    Conclusion: Ask someone who knows. Will this receiver work with either of dishes? Are my receiver settings wrong.

    Please help !!! Thanks from we 5 guys
     
  2. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    You need to decide which LNB you are going to use. if you use SWM, then you need PI. if you use legacy, no PI but then need BBC. Assuming you use SWM with PI, the receiver will auto configure for the LNB type. you just need to aim the dish. if you use legacy LNB, you need BBC and change the dish settings in the receiver and aim the dish.


    Sent from my iPad using DBSTalk
     
  3. BBD1970

    BBD1970 New Member

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    Sep 12, 2013
    Pittsburgh, TX
    peds48-
    I will go with the SL3, which is SWM ? hook up PI inline, ( dish to PI to receiver) and try to be sure I have correct aim. Will use dishpointer from here then select landmarks from from the satellite pics. If I understand correctly, the receiver will not need to be adjusted under "dish type-- settings. ", but will auto configure. Must not be taking correct aim.
    Again , many thanks. X 5
     
  4. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Aim/aligning is the hardest part. If your tailgate location is near your home, then set it up in your driveway, get it aligned. Tear it down and repeat until it's a muscle memory exercise.
    Your mast must be plumb - as vertical as you can get it (use a level).
    Mark one of your tripod legs, or some part of whatever is holding your mast as north, and put it so it is oriented north (magnetic or true doesn't matter, just be consistent). When you get to the tailgate location, set it up the same exact way aimed north.
    Mark your dish where it mounts on the mast. If you set the mast up exactly the same way, and put the dish on the mast exactly the same way, you should have signal when you fire it up. You will probably have to fine tune the alignment to get 99/103 n properly.
     
  5. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Carl, I say this is almost impossible. no matter how accurate or meticulous you are, putting the dish on the new place will require a complete re-point
     
  6. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    I've done this (repeatedly) with an 18" round dish, so it works for getting the 101. Once you have that signal (any measurable level at all), you can easily align to peak and bring in 99 and 103. What is important is to make sure your mast is plumb, and you accurately identify north. If using a compass, you have to know what you are doing to get an accurate reading. If you have dishpointer on your smartphone, that's another fairly easy way to get an initial aim, but in my opinion and experience, harder than using the "north" method. Even if you don't get a signal on power up, you should be very close in azimuth, making it a lot easier to find the signal.

    And yes, you certainly need to align to peak. There is no way you are going to set it up and get 90+ readings instantly. But you will be close and that will make it a lot easier to find 101 and should speed up your overall process.
     
  7. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    I agree that you should be "close". but using this method and getting some kind of readings at start up, is pure luck. I use an inclinometer (very accurate piece of equipment) and point the dish where the compass shows, while I have gotten "lucky" many times, most often then not, I start with 0
     
  8. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    And in a related question to this;

    While there are other handy dish alignment tools available today of course than the integrated one in the receiver's satellite setup, nevertheless I've always been puzzled why the DIRECTV receivers (and perhaps Dish as well) were designed to list the "magnetic" dish azimuth in the setup instead of "geographic" which is the important one?

    Thereby inconveniently requiring you to remember the particular magnetic declination offset for the dish's location in order to calculate the geographic. :confused:
     
  9. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Installers use Compasses, maybe that is why, although they seldom use the receiver to get the settings
     
  10. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    I don't know that you can refer to either true or magnetic north as "the important one". As peds noted, magnetic north is handy when you are using a magnetic compass, assuming you have not adjusted it for declination. Probably a safe assumption for many. Certainly not a safe assumption for anyone using a compass regularly in an outdoor activity environment (hiking, camping, etc.).

    The declination value varies throughout the U.S., and also changes on a continuous basis (about a minute a year where I'm at). If I tell you what magnetic north azimuth you need to know, and you grab a compass, typically you will be able to read that directly on the compass dial. If I tell you a true north azimuth, and you want to measure with a compass, you need to know what the declination is at your location, and whether to add or subtract it from the true bearing. That tends to get complicated for the average person who does not regularly use a compass. For that reason, providing the magnetic bearing tends to be the easier approach for most.
     
  11. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    Thanks;

    I understand now ....
     

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