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Anybody read books? I do.

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Nov 9, 2010 #21 of 522
    bobukcat

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    Id recommend you read the "Rules" books in order (although I didn't by accident and still liked them all) but his others are all stand alone.
     
  2. Nov 10, 2010 #22 of 522
    Rich

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    Thanx, this thread is turning into a gold mine of books to read. I really like to find books that need to be read in series form well after they are first published. With all the books I read, I have a hard time keeping the characters straight in my mind. Since most authors seem to publish one book a year, if I read them when published, I've usually forgotten the previous books and end up reading them again. :)

    Rich
     
  3. Nov 10, 2010 #23 of 522
    Rich

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    Nobody has mentioned Alternate History books yet. I find them fascinating. Harry Turtledove seems to be the acknowledged master of AH at this time and rightly so. He is a prolific writer and a lot of his books need to be read as a series. There are several complete series of his books available right now. I've just completed reading the second of his newest series about WWII. His characters are rich and the books, while quite long, make great reading.

    Harry Harrison also has a couple AH books that are very good too.

    Rich
     
  4. Nov 10, 2010 #24 of 522
    Rich

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    Has anyone read Gary Jennings? Magnificent books. I thought I'd never read another Marco Polo book, but when I started reading The Journeyer, I couldn't put it down.

    Would you think a book about an old Aztec Indian who is almost blind would be interesting? Try Aztec. You'll never forget Mixtli, the nearly blind Aztec.

    How about a book about a couple Civil War vets, who, after the Civil War, hook up with a circus. Sound boring? Try Spangle, you'll love it.

    And then there's Raptor, which is a much sought after book and fetches a hefty price at auction sites. I paid about $50 for my copy on eBay. I won't tell you any more about it, but the first chapter is amazing.

    Some of his books, the sequel to Aztec, for instance, aren't very good, but the ones I've listed above are amazingly good. Shame he passed away.

    Rich
     
  5. Nov 10, 2010 #25 of 522
    Rich

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    One last post and I'll get off. Stephen Hunter. If you like thrillers, you'll like Hunter's books. Usually about snipers and the Swagger family. Great books that you'll never forget and there is, at least, one movie that was made from his Swagger books.

    Then there's James Lee Burke and his Dave Robicheaux series. Great reads. Might be the best, least known, writer of them all.

    Rich
     
  6. Nov 10, 2010 #26 of 522
    Tom Robertson

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    When I was growing up, I read everything I could. Many cereal boxes as well as books. :)

    As I was starting to date, my Mom wished I would find someone who also read.

    Then when I married Mrs. Tibber (nearly 24 years ago), she did read. A lot!

    So we merged two very full libraries into a house that didn't have enough shelving... In fact none of our houses have had enough shelving for all our books! :)

    I admit, I read more online these days via forums and websites, but I still get a real book in every so often.

    Speaking of books, our own Capmeister, aka Dave Galanter, wrote an excellent entry into the Star Trek mythos: Star Trek: Troublesome Minds. I'd love to see the current incarnation of the Star Trek movies use this as a film.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  7. Nov 10, 2010 #27 of 522
    greatwhitenorth

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    What? Nobody mentioning Elmore Leonard? :confused:

    To my mind, the best author in the English language today. I have never had a bad read with any of books.
     
  8. Nov 10, 2010 #28 of 522
    MysteryMan

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    +1......He's always a good read. "The Master Sniper" is my favorite by him.
     
  9. Nov 10, 2010 #29 of 522
    MysteryMan

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    I miss Michael Crichton now that he's gone. Always looked forward to his next novel. Am anticipating Tom Clancy's next novel "Dead or Alive" scheduled to be released on 7 December 2010. You've been missed and long overdue Tom.
     
  10. Nov 10, 2010 #30 of 522
    Rich

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    I was gonna, but I didn't want to post negatives. I know he's very popular, but there are some writers that I just can't read. Literally. I'll just stare at one page and don't get any further. What kills me about Elmore is that he's written so many books that I should be like a pig in a pile of dung and yet, I just can't read his books. I've enjoyed the movies that have been made of his books, but...

    I don't know why some writers are unreadable to me, but I've come to accept it. One of my favorite sports writers on the NY Daily News is Mike Lupica (who writes really good books), who is a great fan of Leonard and it disturbs me every time he mentions one. I know I'm missing something, but I really can't read them.

    Rich
     
  11. Nov 10, 2010 #31 of 522
    Rich

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    Did you read Pale Horse Coming? He managed to turn an outrageous concept into a fine book in that one. I gotta read that one again.

    I think Dirty White Boys is one of his very best and is a stand alone book. It does have a Swagger character in it, but you don't have to read the rest of the books. I highly recommend this book. I've got an Editor's Trade Paperback of this book that I paid for at an auction.

    Rich
     
  12. Nov 10, 2010 #32 of 522
    Rich

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    Forgot all about him. Search for Red October was his first book and he had a terrible time getting someone to publish it.

    I also forgot about Stephen Coonts, who never writes a bad book.

    I also used to read all of Dale Brown's books, but he got so ridiculous (read them, you'll understand) that I gave up on him.

    Also, there's James W. Hall and his Thorn mysteries. The man can just write, but he doesn't write enough.

    Rich
     
  13. Nov 10, 2010 #33 of 522
    Rich

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    I think Crichton could have written about petrified cow flops and it would have been a best seller. Never read a book of his I didn't enjoy. Died way too young.

    Rich
     
  14. Nov 10, 2010 #34 of 522
    bobukcat

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    I really like EL but my wife, like Rich, just can't stand to read him. He does write more dialog than any other writer I can think of and it can take a while to get used to if you've not read his stuff before or even recently. I like the "Hot Kid" and "Up In Honey's Room" quite a bit - he certainly has a different way of twisting things.
     
  15. Nov 10, 2010 #35 of 522
    MysteryMan

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    Another fine author is J.C. Pollock AKA James Elliott!
     
  16. Nov 10, 2010 #36 of 522
    bobukcat

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    Funny story that brings me to another author I like - Dan Brown. I was in the airport one time with just enough time to grab a paperback for my flight and picked up a a Dale Brown book by accident, I read about 10 pages and thought, WTH - this is nothing like anything else he's written! :bonk1:
     
  17. Nov 10, 2010 #37 of 522
    coldsteel

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    Just finished a fictional account of a trial of Robert E Lee by Thomas Fleming. Pretty decent.

    I prefer military sci-fi, like Drake, David Weber, Lois Bujold.
     
  18. Nov 11, 2010 #38 of 522
    klang

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    Near...
    If you haven't yet, check out the Starfist series by David Sherman and Dan Cragg and The Lost Fleet series by Jack Campbell.
     
  19. Nov 11, 2010 #39 of 522
    klang

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    Authors I read regularly: Kevin J. Anderson, Ted Bell, Ben Bova, Dale Brown, Jack Campbell, Tom Clancy, Stephen Coonts, Harold Coyle, Clive Cussler, Ian Douglas, Stephen Frey, David Hagberg, Peter F. Hamilton, Steve Martini, Mathew Reilly, John Scalzi, David Sherman, Brad Thor, David Weber.

    I used to read Ludlum, Crichton and Dick Francis but alas they are no longer with us.

    I seem to read more now after switching to the Kindle.
     
  20. Nov 11, 2010 #40 of 522
    greatwhitenorth

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    Fair criticisms all, Leonard is all about the dialog, and it can be off-putting to some. I personally have always enjoyed dialog in novels more than descriptive passages, but that's just me. To each his own, cheers!
     

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