AT&T/DTV and Others Counter FCC Set-Top Plan With App Proposal

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by CraigerM, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
  2. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    25,223
    1,632
    Nov 13, 2006
    Basically they want to be left alone because they are all already pushing toward that anyway.... Heck DIRECTV and dish already have that implemented now today!
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Terrible idea. Then they are the gatekeepers to decide which set top boxes they support with apps and which they don't, just because it is HTML5 based doesn't mean they wouldn't need a different app for Apple TV, Roku, Android, Samsung TVs, LG TVs, etc. If Amazon paid Comcast $20 million for exclusive rights then you couldn't get Comcast's app on anything else, if TWC got mad at Apple they could just drop support for the Apple TV app and stop updating, so once they changed something on their end it would stop working entirely.

    That's why we need a standard, then they can't just decide to change something on their end and break stuff, don't get to decide who gets their apps and who doesn't, and every set top and TV maker knows exactly they they need on the client side to make it work and aren't beholden to the whims of Big Cable.
     
  4. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    Would an app be better than RVU?
     
  5. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    "Better" in what way?
     
  6. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    Would it perform better than RVU? Then maybe you wouldn't need RVU ready TV's anymore. Just use the App, WIFI or Ethernet on the smart TV?
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    What exactly do you think is the difference between a smart TV running a RVU app and a smart TV running some other app?
     
  8. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,050
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    RVU is an "app".
     
  9. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,344
    505
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    Right, RVU is an app, but who controls any updates? Is it the TV manufacturer? The way I can see a separate app being better is if DirecTV controlled the updates so that you're less likely to run into the Youtube app situation where it stopped working on various models due to it not being updated.
     
  10. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,050
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    The TV manufacturer does. A recent update of the firmware on my Samsung TV also updated the RVU client.
     
  11. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    I wonder if Samsung is getting the RVU client code from Directv, or are developing it themselves? Since Directv is the only one using the RVU "standard", they are in the driver's seat as far as changes the protocol go. That's pretty much how it would be if Comcast, TWC et al do apps, they'd write the code and provide it to set top and TV manufacturers, and it is up to them to update. If you buy an off-brand TV, you might find out too late that it doesn't have an app for your cable/satellite provider...too bad for you!

    The problem is that at least where TVs are concerned, you can't count on firmware updates more than a year or two after purchase. So if Comcast makes a change that requires changes to their app, if those apps aren't updated (i.e. when Samsung decides it doesn't care about providing your TV with firmware updates any longer) then your the Comcast app on your TV will stop working - either for certain functionality, or entirely, depending on what was changed.

    This isn't a problem if there's an overall standard that Comcast, TWC, Directv, Dish and everyone else has to meet. For those who have an aversion to 'government regulation', imagine if the government hadn't set and enforced the ATSC standard, and stations were free to stay with NTSC, use ATSC, use DVB-T, use ISDB-T, or invent their own and tell you to get an "app".
     
  12. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    I didn't know RVU is an App.
     
  13. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    Not sure if I asked you this already but do you have a 2016 TV? If so how is the RVU performance on that? Does the guide still look dim and scroll slow?
     
  14. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,050
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    Mine is a 2015. RVU performance at first sucked so a got a C61k. With the latest update I've tried RVU and performance is better.
     
  15. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    It may not be in the same section where the TV's other apps are, but it is code running on a smart TV. That's basically the definition of an app. A TV might have an 'app menu' but have Netflix "built in" with one button access to it, but Netflix is still an app on that TV regardless of how it is categorized by the manufacturer.
     
  16. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    25,223
    1,632
    Nov 13, 2006
    I am sure the first issue they worry about is finger pointing. Customer calls to ask a question on how to use their dvr..

    dtv: Sorry, we are dtv, you need to call the maker of the dvr, not us.

    Customer: But I pay you for the service! And they don't have people I can call!

    dtv: Then switch to our gear...
     
  17. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,670
    105
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    Good point! Now I can see why TV providers like to use their equipment instead of other companies.
     
  18. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    11,153
    1,719
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Well it is no different than if you use a Harmony remote to control your Directv receiver today. If you have problems you may have to call Harmony or may have to call Directv, depending on the problem. If you want one stop finger pointing you have to use the Directv remote.
     
  19. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,050
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    Bad example... If you call DirecTV the first thing they have you do is use the remote that came with the unit. :)
     
  20. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    25,223
    1,632
    Nov 13, 2006
    Yeah I agree, that example doesn't work. You dont have to make the harmony work to make the service work. With directv supplying the source and others the hardware, you go back to the way it used to be where you have to have two people to figure something out, the manufacturer and the source provider. Directv hardware was all done by others for a long time and they had to keep people apprised on how to work all kinds of different hardware. It was not easy and they frankly got to big to deal with so many different options of hardware.

    Who do people call now that have directv tivos? Directv. Look at how much finger pointing there has been between tivo and directv on a couple of their dumb issues on the newest tivo box that has directv built in.. Just sayin, explode that 100 fold...
     

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements