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AT&T To Beta Test Next Generation TV Platform In 2017

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by CraigerM, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

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    I keep forgetting about the processing power in the H/HR series boxes. I found this new article on the merging of the TV platforms. It had some interesting news on UVerseTV.

    DIRECTV NOW Cloud DVR Will Come Courtesy of New Unified AT&T Entertainment Platform - Telecompetitor
     
  2. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Obviously it makes more sense from many perspectives, except for those people who like to feel they are in control of their recordings - i.e., what if a cloud DVR expires recordings after a month or a year? Some people like to save stuff "forever" (though in some cases that may be limited to how long the DVR or its hard drive last) I wouldn't be shocked if they do that because otherwise their storage needs will continually increase instead of stabilizing after a month or so. Does PSVue's cloud DVR store stuff forever or is there a limit?

    I could maybe see them adding an option for cloud DVR functionality to Directv's satellite product at some point. If you have high speed internet - especially if it is provided by AT&T and Directv related use can be zero-rated - they could save money by providing you a version of the HS17 without a hard drive.

    They'd already be paying for the cloud DVR system as part of Directv Now, so letting Directv satellite customers access it wouldn't increase their back-end costs much at all. Could never convert everyone over though for obvious reasons.
     
  3. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    PSVue currently has a 28 day retention limit for the cloud DVR. After the 28 days most of the content is then available on demand. It has not been an issue for me. Again, it all depends on your usage patterns. If you are someone who wants to save things for a long time it is not going to work for you.
     
  4. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    That about what I expected. I think that covers over 99% of people. There aren't many who want to save stuff forever. I have recordings months old, but not because I want to save them but just because I haven't got around to watching them yet :)
     
  5. boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    That was me with the last month of NCIS:New Orleans had 5 episodes recorded just took me till last week to finally watch them and finish the season.
     
  6. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    A personal DVR (whether in the home or in the cloud) falls under a law that allows personal recording of content. A company that makes one recording for later delivery to multiple customers does not fall under that law (they are not personal recordings). That company would need to negotiate for permission to provide such a service.

    Allowing a streaming provider to make one recording per show for later delivery saves them storage space. One recording per market would contain the same local commercials as a live viewing, or commercials could be replaced at the time of viewing with more current promotions. (Why show commercials for the Memorial Day Sale after the Fourth of July? Show current ads.) Since it is a negotiated service the length of time a recording is available or other limitations on viewing can be added.

    If the streaming provider is relying solely on the laws that allow personal recording they must have a recording for each customer. Which requires forethought by the customer and more storage space for the provider. Limiting people's online personal space is needed to keep the system from overflowing.

    Streaming is a shift between "I subscribe to channels" to "I subscribe to content". Sign up for Netflix or CBS All Access and you get the content available each day until your subscription ends. Content not on each service or removed from each service is not available. And content is no longer available after the subscription lapses. One does not watch a DVR recording of what aired at a specific time ... they watch a program recording during the time that it is available.

    On demand is a good bridge between channel delivery and content delivery. I can record "The Daily Show" and watch it whenever (including keeping favorite episodes indefinitely) the way a channel subscriber would watch the show or I can wait until each show becomes available on demand - which saves recording space and forethought. Perhaps as the industry moves forward more contracts will include on demand and less personal DVR use will be required (for customers with access to streaming).
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    They can have "one recording per customer" while sharing the storage space thanks to modern storage arrays. They do something called 'deduplication' which checks if the block being stored already exists on the array, so only one copy is actually stored and the rest of the blocks are pointers to the real one. As far as the software is concerned, 1000 people might be recording the same thing separately - meeting the "personal recording" rule - but only one copy would actually be saved on the array thanks to the software running on it.

    If you assume there are 1000 channels, and you have a 28 day recording window, you can calculate 1000 channels * 28 days * 24 hours/day * 3600 seconds/hour * 6 Mb/sec avg data rate and get about 1800 terabytes of storage required. In reality it would never be anything like that, it isn't like every channel will be recorded and saved the maximum 28 days, but that gives you a (very) worst case scenario.
     
  8. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    That sounds like an argument that would end up in a plaintiff friendly Texas court then the supreme court.

    Aereo got in trouble for a bigger problem (claiming that they were renting individual remote antennas to individual customers instead of rebroadcasting local TV signals without permission). But wasn't their DVR system based on similar logic? It would be better to get the channel's permission before attempting such a scheme.
     
  9. Bill Broderick

    Bill Broderick Icon

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    Cablevision tried this and lost in court. They are required to have unique physical copies for each customer who has recorded it. It's was an unfortunate ruling. But, that's what is required.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  10. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    What Cablevision did was explicitly design their system to have only a single copy. Having copies for everyone where underlying technology reduces the amount of storage needed can be argued to be no different than other technological advancements like video compression that reduce storage/bandwidth needs.
     
  11. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    "... only one copy is actually stored and the rest of the blocks are pointers to the real one."

    Only one real copy? Sounds like a win for the plaintiffs (especially in those friendly Texas courts).
     
  12. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    Of course DTV, Dish, and the cable cos are going to use every legal hurdle they can throw at the OTT providers to save their golden goose and cash cow. They will hold on to their inflated price structures as long as they possibly can.
     
  13. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    In this case it would be the copyright holders (via stations and networks) suing distributors who did not have permission to do cloud recordings. DTV would have no standing to sue a competitor.
     
  14. osu1ne

    osu1ne New Member

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    I agree. I have had an issue for some time with HR44 dropping internet connection. This also takes my two HR24s offline. It is very frustrating. I have talked to dtv techs and their answer is Connect HR44 to ethernet. The dtv tech that came to the house said this is a known issue that dtv has known about for a year. I live in a condo and there is no way to connect with ethernet. The router is two rooms away. He said there probably will not be a fix because most resources are on HS17.
     
  15. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    If you have not done this already, try raising the Router to as high as you can get it in that room. I have mine at about 6 feet elevation and it does make the signal go further in the house.
     
  16. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Patents != copyrights. The east Texas courts are patent friendly, they don't bring copyright cases there.
     
  17. twiseguy

    twiseguy Legend

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    I just want DTV/ATT to offer a single receiver that will carry 4K without some add on, and will have the ability to pick up ota.
    (since they don`t much care about the am21 they sold people)
    Seems like Direct always falls short on equipment.
     
  18. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    Never said they would sue them directly themselves. And I wouldn't blame them at all for encouraging the copyright holders to do so. Like I said, they will do everything they legally can to throw up roadblocks in front of the OTT providers to protect there inflated price structures and buy themselves time.
     
  19. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It is much easier to get permission than fight in court, especially with PLAINTIFF friendly courts.
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    That's because most routers broadcast "down". Raising the router definitely will help.

    Rich
     

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