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AT&T To Launch Full DTV Using The Internet This Fall

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by CraigerM, May 15, 2018.

  1. je4755

    je4755 Godfather

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    I’m trying to interpret the following comment from Randall Stephenson:

    “. . . if you're today's DIRECTV customer and you're paying anywhere -- or $110 to $200 a month, there's a very important market of people who want that big bundle of content. They want access to that kind of bundle of content. It's everything from Sunday ticket to HBO and all the premium content, multiple streams into a household and so forth. That will be there, and it will be there for a long time, but the streaming development is going to give us the opportunity then to step down from there, and we will be launching in the fourth quarter off the DIRECTV NOW platform a premium streaming product."

    Does the phrase “step down from there” suggest the new streaming service will incorporate many, but not all, of the channels/options available via satellite?
     
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  2. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

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  3. compnurd

    compnurd Hall Of Fame

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    I am going to guess it may have a stream limitation like directv now
     
  4. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    So is the idea to try to somehow increase customer switching friction and in that way try to lock-in customers? If not then why have your own piece of hardware which you have to support? Perhaps I’m just missing something...me and the rest of the OTT providers, none of which have their own hardware.
     
  5. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It is already being done on DIRECTV and DISH. The boxes switch on the fly between live DBS streams and ads predownloaded on the DVR. The program one is watching does not need to be DVRd to have targeted ads inserted. The current incarnation uses targeted ads delivered (in advance) via satellite but delivering ads (in advance) via the Internet would not be hard.
     
  6. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    So satellite is NOT going away any time soon. And the new IPTV service will be a step down.
     
  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The two issues keeping people with the traditional providers are content ("all" the content ... not selected channels from separate subscriptions) and customer experience. The younger generation growing up device centric instead of channel centric is more willing to adopt a "buy multiple subscriptions" plan ... but there are still a lot of people who need a gateway to bridge between old school and new school. DBS level subscriptions via IPTV would be a good bridge.
     
  8. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

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    I predict this will suck. The price is misleading. Take your current viewing habits, guesstimate the amount of data that represents per month, then look at your internet service. Almost certain you're going to have to get a much larger internet service package just to get the cap raised. Care to venture how much that is going to cost? At least as much as this mythical savings. And I'm not even considering 4K. Looking deeper you might find it interesting that there is a good possibility that your internet providers backbone provider is... AT&T! I have Mediacom and that is/was certainly the case.

    Secondly, if this takes off it will further accelerate the need for internet (and backbone providers) - to increase capacity. Most of us see drops in speed depending on the time of day/week. That's the joy of shared - and limited - capacity technology. Cable/coax has its limits. Sure, they can do gigabit speeds now but that doesn't indicate how many users get that at the same time. 10s of thousands of streamers in a community in the evening will certainly crush that. As a side, what happens to non-video throughput? Who gets throttled? Combine this with the loss of net neutrality and the various highway speeds and costs will be profit nirvana.

    I fully expect that "cloud DVR" will suck. I tried the first DTV client and I thought it sucked for responsiveness. Just wait til your button press is lagging over the internet. The only way to relieve that is to put local storage at your home and buffer the hell out of it. Something I doubt they have in mind as the purpose of cloud anything is to remove the resources (and cost) from your home.

    Is it technically possible to make this all work well? Sure. Maybe someday every neighborhood will have terabit capacity. A good hardware design for the home is possible. The question is when and how much is it going to cost?

    No dispute that DTV should be worried. If/when 4K takes off they are going to be in serious pain trying to deliver 100's of channels of garbage at 4K via sat.

    That's all technical stuff. The other side of this is that its still likely to be the same kind of packages made up of mostly fly-over channels that most people could care less about. Maybe they should wake up and realize that their root problem is not the cost and convenience (lack thereof) of their delivery service but the quality of the content and the way its structured.
     
  9. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    I get what you are saying but their is no technical reason that I can think of that they couldn't deliver both the content and customer experience they need to without having their own hardware. Why incur the trouble and expense of developing and supporting your own streaming device? Why not just concentrate on writing a top notch app. It is already the approach they have been taking with DTV Now. What does having their own hardware get them other than some attempt at customer lock in or at least trying to increase switching friction. And if that is the case it just makes me think they don't really understand some of what is driving people to move to the OTT providers in the first place....people no longer want to get locked in by either contracts or hardware.
     
  10. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    Maybe D's cloud DVR will suck...I don't know. But what I can tell you is I have been using PSVue's cloud DVR for over a year now and it is actually a better experience for me than I was getting with my D in house DVR. No conflicts to worry about, no space to manage (basically unlimited recording capacity), no hardware to manage (failures, upgrades, etc), and smooth FF/REW with full screen view of what you are FF/REW thru. I live out in the middle of no where but thankfully I have an excellent ISP with 50 mb service with no data caps for $64/month. I realize that currently not everyone has an internet connection that will effectively support OTT service but I think as technology progresses that situation is going to improve. Quality high speed wireless net access is closer than people realize. Once/if that happens it will be a game changer.
     
  11. TDK1044

    TDK1044 Godfather

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    One thing I hope gets thought about more in the evolution towards streaming based solutions, is the remote control. When I tested DirecTV Now out on my Roku a while back, other than the lack of a cloud based DVR, my main gripe was the remote. When you're used to the kind of remote associated with satellite television, the kind of remote you get with the streaming options are pretty frustrating in my view. I know that you can use your smart phone to drive the app, but it's still not great.
     
  12. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    As James Long said they're already doing live ad insertion, so again how is this new product going to get better ad revenue than satellite? You seem to take everything AT&T's CEO says at face value, but you gotta understand he's not talking to customers he's talking to analysts. He's telling them what they want to hear to help increase the stock price.

    He wants to make IP delivery sound like it will somehow be more profitable than satellite, even though he knows it won't, so he can't tell analysts "we're going to get the same targeted advertising rates for our new product that we've been getting for DVR customers of our satellite product for years". He's trying to make it sound like they are tapping a new revenue stream.
     
  13. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    After all the lying ads we've seen over the years how can we expect anything else? Yeah, they'll nickel and dime us as usual. I don't see the need for a massive amount of recording space but some folks might.

    Rich
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    The remotes the streaming devices such as the Fire boxes and ATVs use should not be compared to D*'s remotes. It's a different experience. You simply don't need a complicated remote. You don't have to sit with the remote in your hand. You don't have to use the remote at all if you don't want to once you begin streaming. The episodes in a series don't have to be deleted, they're always available. And they play automatically, one episode ends and the next one starts in few seconds. No real need to even pick up the remote. Yeah, it takes a little time to get used to the remotes but they are in no way anything like a D* remote. There are no channel changes, no number buttons. Streaming is so easy, give it a chance.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    So, basically, he's trying to baffle everyone listening to him with BS? The CEO of a company that has a track record of deceptive advertising? Is anyone shocked?

    Rich
     
  16. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The needs to be some way of getting the content to the screen. A "smart TV" that can download an app and access the Internet is one way. But everyone else (and there are a lot of everyone elses) will need "a" box. It might as well be one that AT&T|DIRECTV controls and can manage than tell your customers that they have to buy a box from someone else (or worse yet, put money in their competitors pockets by selling or giving away boxes that can access other providers).

    It is cheap to launch a service on other people's equipment and other people's connections. But if you want to reach the same level of customer experience on the majority of your customer's devices having a dedicated box is the best option. No question of if what a developer writes as a GUI will look the same on several different platforms. No multiple code sets because of quirks in one IPTV box vs another.

    There may also be some contractual benefits (as mentioned earlier in this thread) where AT&T|DIRECTV is allowed to deliver content end to end (where they control both ends of the connection) that they cannot get the rights to carry over other people's equipment. In any case ... there are plenty of benefits to having AT&T|DIRECTV developed equipment.
     
  17. TDK1044

    TDK1044 Godfather

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    My experience was different. I won't be going the streaming route for a year or two yet though, there's still a lot of polishing to do, so we'll see where we are then. :)
     
  18. Richard

    Richard Legend

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    for me, at least, live TV is dead. First, I never ever want to see another Advertisement again. I am paying for content, I shouldn't have to watch Ads also. Second, even with a DVR, there were too many instances of missed shows, or shows where the local affiliate broke in with what they thought was "breaking news". I NEVER watch "news" on TV, never have, never will. So for them to interrupt the shows I am trying to record is completely unacceptable.

    For me, what I get from Hulu's no commercial plan and CBS All Access No Commercial plan works great. I use the TV app on an Apple TV 4k and all the shows I want to watch are all available in once place. In my opinion, this is what TV should be.

    I do still have a DirecTV subscription, but I really don't know why anymore, mostly because I don't want to go through the hassle of calling to cancel (something we should be able to do on their website).
     
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  19. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    I just don’t see people going back to having to have a unique box tied to a service. I know I certainly won’t. I’m not talking about smart tv’s. The technology is moving too fast and the tv manufacturers unfortunately have not standardized. But devices like Roku, ATV, Nvidia Shield, and some of the other Android based streaming boxes are moving toward becoming “universal” streaming devices. It’s much easier and cheaper to have an app that you can port to the various OS requirements than to develop, distribute, and support your own hardware streaming box. I already have a streaming box of some flavor on all my tv’s. The last thing I wan to do, or will do for that matter, is install a dedicated hardware device just to use someone’s OTT offering. To play in this space D is already going to have to develop and support an app that runs on the streaming devices people already have. So to have their own box they will have to do both. And again, I just can’t see the need. But hey, maybe the geniuses at AT&T see something I don’t.
     
  20. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    While AT&T|DIRECTV would certainly accept a subscriber "going back" to their service you are completely missing the point of the "full DTV" service that we are discussing. The point of AT&T|DIRECTV's full DTV via IPTV service is to be a gateway for SATELLITE and cable subscribers who wish to keep the customer experience they are accustomed to (all the channels, one box) but use an Internet connection instead of a dish or paying their cable company for channels.

    If you are thinking that this proposed service is not for you you would be right. It is not for you and other people who don't mind having a mix of interfaces, boxes and services to juggle. This service is for people who simply want to pay ONE PROVIDER for content and watch TV. Lesser offerings will remain available for people like you (such as DIRECTV NOW).
     

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