AT&T TV / AT&T TV Now - Pricing Thread (Premier pkg launched 7/29/20)

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by techguy88, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. b4pjoe

    b4pjoe New Member

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    The other difference between TVision and AT&T TV for me is that TVision isn't available in my area.
     
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  2. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    But it probably will be before long. TVision is currently available only in a few select areas where they've struck deals for distribution of their managed IPTV service over certain broadband partner connections. When T-Mobile bought Layer3 TV, they basically just gave it a new name and slapped some magenta on it.

    But in the coming weeks/months, TVision will be re-launched as a new service with a totally new distribution system. Basically, it's moving from managed IPTV to OTT, which means it will be accessible over any internet connection. The new TVision will be fundamentally different from the existing service just as AT&T TV is different from Uverse TV. AT&T's Uverse TV and the current iteration of TVision are both accessible only via their own proprietary STBs and delivered over certain compatible broadband connections. AT&T TV and the upcoming version of TVision are app-based, accessible over any broadband or cellular connection, and offer an Android TV streaming device with a UI and remote control that are customized to their cable TV service but also allow easy access to third-party OTT apps.

    That said, just because the underlying tech will allow TVision to be accessible anywhere, it remains to be seen whether T-Mobile will actually sell it nationwide. But past remarks indicate that that's the plan: sell it nationwide, to anyone, regardless of whether they take other T-Mobile services. We'll see. Of course, if they do, that means they'll need to get a whole bunch more local stations on board. But maybe they've already done that. The new service is reported to be tech-ready to roll out.
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The proof of TVision will be in the pudding. Whether the flavor is chocolate or something that comes out in steaming coils remains to be seen.

    This late in the game, there will be no excuses for weakness in an aspect of the product.
     
  4. b4pjoe

    b4pjoe New Member

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    Maybe but I'm not sure I can even get TMobile cell service here. The nearest TMobile store is 70 miles away.
     
  5. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    To clarify: the delivery system that TVision uses will soon change so that it can be accessed over any internet connection, i.e. "over-the-top" (OTT). So if you have home internet that would allow you to get AT&T TV or YouTube TV or Hulu, etc., then you would also be able to get TVision.

    What's unknown is whether T-Mobile makes the business decision to sell TVision nationwide, to any address, any customer. But the new technology platform that TVision will ride on will allow that, if they choose to do so. My guess is that T-Mobile will mainly try to sell it to folks who get cellular or home internet service from them (just as AT&T does with AT&T TV) but that they will let anyone sign up for TVision online and ship them their customized streaming dongle to do a simple self-install (also as AT&T TV does).

    If my hunch proves true, this forum will have a lot of folks making comparisons between AT&T TV and TVision (and YouTube TV and Hulu with Live TV), trying to figure out which nationwide OTT cable TV service offers the best combination of price, channels, features, etc.
     
  6. compnurd

    compnurd Hall Of Fame

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    Sledgehammer tried TVision a month or so ago and it didn’t last a weekend in his house I don’t think. Picture quality was horrible. It was bad in store and bad at home also
     
  7. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Mobile phone company video products are often been oriented towards use on mobile phones. For example, the Netflix that comes bundled with wireless service is typically the SD product so its no wonder that it looks terrible on a TV. The same would likely be true of Quibi if they could get anyone to bundle it with their wireless service.

    Speaking specifically to TVision, they claim that they use state-of-the-art compression to deliver whatever pixel matrix the content comes in (HD or 4K). It is absolutely possible (though not practical) to preserve the pixel matrix size without preserving quality.
     
  8. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    You're both referencing TVision as it currently exists: a managed IPTV service using Layer 3 TV's technology for back-end servers and set-top boxes.

    T-Mobile is scrapping all that. They basically outsourced a redesign of the back-end system to MobiTV, which offers MSOs a turnkey OTT video platform with a suite of customizable apps for retail devices. Additionally, T-Mobile is licensing Google's Android TV Operator Tier OS to put out their own customized set-top box (dongle, actually), similar to what Sling has done with their AirTV device and what AT&T TV has done with their own box.

    So whatever bugs, picture quality issues, etc. exist with the current TVision, there's no reason to think that they'll carry over to the forthcoming OTT version of the service. (Although it's certainly possible that the new service could have its own set of shortcomings. We'll have to wait and see.) That would be like evaluating AT&T Uverse TV and thinking it gave you any idea about AT&T TV. It doesn't. They're two different tech platforms.
     
  9. compnurd

    compnurd Hall Of Fame

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    When is this launching?
     
  10. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    People can only review what is currently available. Future promises are not tangible, although it sounds like they are rebranding other company's work so it will be in the realm of no better or no worse than the other companies rebranding the common parts of the platform. The issue will come down to price and packaging. If I recall correctly T Mobile chose the high end with AT&T.
     
  11. techguy88

    techguy88 Well-Known Member

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    There is no confirmed launch date yet.
     
  12. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    It's reported that the new TVision was supposed to have already launched but it's been pushed back because of the pandemic, which forced the closure of some T-Mobile stores, which will play a key role in selling the service. But the tech is ready to go. So it's just a marketing question at this point. Supposedly it will launch "later in 2020". We'll see.

    Android TV also playing a part in T-Mobile's new pay-TV play | Light Reading
     
  13. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Obviously. But when comments about the specifics of the existing TVision service are made in response to what I posted above, it seemed unclear to me if the posters understood that the existing service will be technologically unrelated to the future TVision service that I've been talking about.

    Well, T-Mobile simply acquired Layer3 TV and renamed it to TVision, keeping the original service pretty much unchanged. It's a higher-end service with a full cable channel package with lots of DVR storage. No extra charges for HD, 4K, DVR, locals or RSNs. It's all in there for $90/mo. And no contract. But you have to use their STBs and if you want to watch on additional TVs, extra boxes rent for $10/mo each.

    Over two years ago, T-Mo's CEO talked about a different TV service they planned to launch and it was dubbed T-Mobile TV. It was clearly going to be OTT and app-based. They said they weren't going to go the skinny bundle route but vaguely talked about how it would be different from other options on the market, destroy the hated cablecos, blah, blah, blah. They released a teaser video with some mock-up screens for the service. But then the whole thing just quietly withered away, never getting mentioned any more. Instead, they just decided to turn TVision into an OTT service with the help of MobiTV to handle the underlying tech platform.

    But, yeah, it remains to be seen if it'll keep the same fat channel bundle and same $90/mo price. I could see them maybe pricing it at just above break-even level (as Google does with YouTube TV) if TVision is bundled with their cellular or home internet service, in order to make those products stickier. We'll see...
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
  14. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    While incorporating anecdotal information from real-world testing, my comments were more pointed at what wireless companies have typically espoused. The fact that they've contracted with a mobile video platform company doesn't add confidence to the idea that the service will be equally at home on a big screen TV.

    The reality will be somewhere in between but to take their superiority assurances at face value just isn't reasonable.
     
  15. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    What are you talking about? The company TVision will be working with, MobiTV, isn't a "mobile video platform company". They have an OTT IP video platform that serves a range of devices, not just mobile, but also all four major TV-connected platforms: Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV and Android TV. MSOs that use the MobiTV platform, such as Chattanooga's Electric Power Board or C Spire, use it to deliver service to their customers' TVs. It's not something tacked on, on the side, just for mobile devices.

    Not sure who's "superiority assurances" you're referring to. TVision's? They've made no public comments about the future OTT version of the service. Are you talking about MobiTV's claims about their platform? In that case, one can look at how it works on systems where it's actually been deployed over the past few years.

    If you're interested in learning something about MobiTV and their clients, here's their website: MOBITV
     

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