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Battling bumper bigotry: DMV fights ugly messages on the road

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Mark Holtz, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. Apr 19, 2017 #41 of 135
    Bill Broderick

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    This was the argument for the reason that an alternate second definition for the word "literally" is the opposite of the "real" definition.

    2 : in effect : virtually —used in an exaggerated way to emphasize a statement or description that is not literally true or possible will literally turn the world upside down to combat cruelty or injustice — Norman Cousins
     
  2. Apr 19, 2017 #42 of 135
    Nick

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    The...
    A "dock" is virtually a hole in the water in which you park your boat, typically adjacent to a pier. A "pier" is literally the place upon which you step off the boat to avoid getting wet.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
  3. Apr 19, 2017 #43 of 135
    trh

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    "A lectern that's on a podium".

    I've seen it used for vertically challenged speakers. But the ones I've seen have been a large podium extending equally under the lectern.

    And Secretary Clinton used a small podium/step behind her lectern during the first debate to elevate her higher above her lectern. If I remember correctly, President Trump is about 9-10" taller than her.
     
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  4. Apr 19, 2017 #44 of 135
    James Long

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    I did not write the article linked ... so they cannot disagree with me.
     
  5. Apr 19, 2017 #45 of 135
    James Long

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    I read that as 9 foot 10 inches. Then I read it again.
     
  6. Apr 20, 2017 #46 of 135
    Rich

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    I know, found that out while reading an encyclopedia on the porcelain throne at home while on leave from my ship. I've won some money on this over the years. The definition used to be in the Coast Guard manual, that might have changed. Used to hang out in a bar owned by a guy who had owned many boats (the bar served shrimp cocktails that were superb) and the subject popped up one night. I heard many definitions bandied about that night, none correct. Finally, getting tired of arguing, I was about to give up. The owner of the bar had a Coast Guard manual in his office, got it, read it, and pronounced my definition correct. I won a bunch of shrimp cocktails that night!

    Rich
     
  7. Apr 20, 2017 #47 of 135
    trh

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    But you can step onto a dock (as long as it isn't a dry dock that has been flooded). A pier can be a type of a dock.
     
  8. Apr 20, 2017 #48 of 135
    billsharpe

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    Pier is a noun; dock is both a noun and a verb. You can certainly dock a ship at a pier, though.:eek:
     
  9. Apr 20, 2017 #49 of 135
    Rich

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    Might want to do a little more research, step onto a dock and you'll be in water. They're two different things.

    Rich
     
  10. Apr 20, 2017 #50 of 135
    Rich

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    If piers were anything like docks, you could pier a ship. Can't do that.

    Rich
     
  11. Apr 20, 2017 #51 of 135
    James Long

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    the definition of dock
    1. a landing pier.
    2. the space or waterway between two piers or wharves, as for receiving a ship while in port.
    3. such a waterway, enclosed or open, together with the surrounding piers, wharves, etc.
    4. dry dock.
    5. a platform for loading and unloading trucks, railway freight cars, etc.
    6. an airplane hangar or repair shed.
    7. Also called scene dock. a place in a theater near the stage or beneath the floor of the stage for the storage of scenery.
     
  12. Apr 20, 2017 #52 of 135
    Rich

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    And then there's this:
    English is a sloppy language in which one word may have several popular, but technically incorrect, meanings. The difference between a dock and a pier is one example. The sailing public may think a dock is the same as a pier, but to a professional seafarer the dock is the water adjacent to the pier to which he ties his vessel.


    Watery Parking Space
    A dock is a watery parking space, while a pier is like a sidewalk. Unlike a dock, a pier is a concrete, steel or wooden transitional structure between water and land. Ashore, you must leave your parking place to arrive at your destination, whether a store, an office or some other facility. You cross a transitional structure, such as a sidewalk, to get to the buildings around the parking lot. Like your parking place, the dock is a defined, albeit watery, place in the water alongside a pier where you park your boat. You walk across or up a transitional structure, a pier, to travel between your boat's dock and the buildings and facilities ashore.

    This is what I'd base my argument on.

    In any event, most people don't know the difference and the way the language is these days...

    Rich
     
  13. Apr 20, 2017 #53 of 135
    trh

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    And do you have a link to your source(s)?
     
  14. Apr 21, 2017 #54 of 135
    James Long

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    OK. I'll stand on what most of the English speaking world would call a dock. You can stand on what you call a dock. You'll need a flotation device.

    Now if only I could put that on a license plate.
     
  15. Apr 21, 2017 #55 of 135
    trh

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    Dock is similar to podium/lectern in that the definition has apparently morphed in the US.

    From the Oxford Dictionary:
    I've been to several of the docks in London where they all are enclosed by gates/locks because the tides on the River Thames can be quite substantial. I just didn't know until this conversation that dock and pier meant the same only in the US.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
  16. Apr 21, 2017 #56 of 135
    Rich

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    Think I made it up? :( Here: The Difference Between Docks and Piers
    I asked Google (I can still talk to Google on my laptop for some reason) to "Compare: Pier and Dock". I chose that answer because it was well written and in agreement with what I've read in many other places. When I first found the article in an encyclopedia there was no Google or Internet. Glad to see nothing's changed, I am.

    Rich
     
  17. Apr 21, 2017 #57 of 135
    Rich

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    For some reason I thought you'd been in the Navy. Docks and piers were pretty well defined during my time on a destroyer. And that was our Navy.

    Here's what the Urban Dictionary thinks a dock is, should we go by these definitions? Just because it's a "dictionary"? I do enjoy the UD, BTW. Urban Dictionary: Dock

    Rich
     
  18. Apr 21, 2017 #58 of 135
    James Long

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    Wikipedia and other community edited sites with limited quality control would be less able to be trusted.

    If one is going to discount a professionally edited dictionary from a publisher that has been around longer than the one complaining (such as Webster's or the OED) just because the definition of a particular term does not match one's preconceived opinion then one is showing their own bias. And one probably shouldn't discount a source that they relied on in a previous post ... for example, using "Dictionary.com" in one post as a "see, I was right!" proof but discarding "Dictionary.com" when their definition differs.
     
  19. Apr 21, 2017 #59 of 135
    trh

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    No I don't think you made it up. I'm just trying to check why several dictionaries list a different definition of dock for North America. Is it like the podium/lectern definition where common misuse of the word podium in the US was so prevalent that the definition of podium was changed?
     
  20. Apr 21, 2017 #60 of 135
    trh

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    I was in the Navy. And the only dock I went to (while in the Navy), was a dry dock. Everything else was a pier, jetty or a wharf.
     

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