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Blu Ray with Netflix and WiFi

Discussion in 'Blu-Ray Hardware' started by islesfan, May 20, 2010.

  1. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Personally...I think these are tough times to choose a Blu Ray player....especially if future-proofing is your goal.

    There are so many choices....WIFI...download services....upconversion quality....internal hard disk options....3D compatibility....and so on...

    The best approach is to narrow your top 2-3 "must have" capabilities, then research the best units with those items.
     
  2. hoophead

    hoophead Godfather

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    As does the S570
     
  3. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    That highly-rated unit is likely the best choice as a solid performer which also offers some good future-proofing.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think NetFlix only streams content in 720p. Don't understand how you get 1080p. Remember, I'm only talking about streaming content, not getting discs in the mail, which I do thru NetFlix. As far as I know, all providers only stream 720p. Has something changed?

    Rich
     
  5. hoophead

    hoophead Godfather

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    Yes,Rich, as of yet it is 720p.
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I haven't read anything positive about NetFlix streaming anything but 720p. Keep seeing hopeful posts about it on the Roku forums, but nothing to give us hope that it will be coming soon. Roku just came out with radio channels, something I've been hoping to get.

    I've got a feeling we've got a long wait until we see anything in 1080i or 1080p streaming. Perhaps if one of NetFlix competitors would do it first NetFlix would follow. Amazon only streams in 720p, also.

    Rich
     
  7. Nighthawk68

    Nighthawk68 Godfather

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    Northern...
    The Sony BDPS-570 is a good choice, there is a 3D firmware available for it right now. The unit does a great job on the new Sony HX900 3D tv's.
    The Samsung BDC-6500 is WiFi as is the 3D BDC-6900.
     
  8. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    If you don't need WiFi, the Sony S470 will save you a little money. (It's exactly the same as the S570, but without the WiFi.)

    I have the 570 hardwired, and love it. I've had no issues with it at all. My Netflix streaming looks good (as well as Netflix can given their limits today).

    We owners of these two units (470 & 570) are anxiously awaiting this months update as it promises enhancements (among other things) to DNLA.
     
  9. Nighthawk68

    Nighthawk68 Godfather

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    Northern...
    The update is out, I updated a 570 at work the other day with a disk Sony sent me. A few days earlier I saw it on the Sony website, maybe its just not available for streaming yet.

    Too bad I can not apply this update to my BDPS-550 :D
     
  10. hoophead

    hoophead Godfather

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    What is the DNLA?
     
  11. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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  12. hoophead

    hoophead Godfather

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  13. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    :lol::lol::lol:

    We live in a crazy world of too many acronyms....even those used by the dyslexic or fat fingers. :D
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Hmm. More toys. Better toys. Toys that talk to each other. That's the upside. Gotta buy those toys and learn how to use them, that's the downside. :)

    Rich
     
  15. SteveHas

    SteveHas Hall of Fame

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    look harder
    they are not $400.00!!!!
     
  16. bcab17

    bcab17 Mentor

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    I think someone mentioned 720p as the highest res for streaming...that may be so for Netflix, but someone told me that VUDU streams 1080p. If that's the case then I would consider a BD player that can stream VUDU content (LG does for sure, and I think Samsung does too, but I never see any mention of it in their advertised specs). I have no experience with any streaming yet...I'm just starting to research it.

    That leads me to a basic home network question. My home theater is located in a place that makes an ethernet wired connection extremely difficult. So I've installed a wireless bridge, connected my DTV HD DVR via ethernet to the bridge, and have just started downloading a few DTV on Demand programs, and tried a few TV Apps. The download times are extremely long, and the apps are so slow to load. I must assume that when I add a new BD player, and look to start streaming HD content it will be similarly slow.

    I've got the typical cable company broadband service (cable modem), and a wireless G router and bridge. My corless phones are on the 5G band, and our three laptops all have no internet connection problems throughout the house.

    Which of the following options would make the most sense to try to rectify the super slow download/streaming speeds:

    1) Switch to wireless N
    2) Try Powerline adapters for a "wired" connection

    Are the re any other things to try?
     
  17. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Using TV Apps to gauge possible streaming speed may not be a valid test. Many of us with hard wired setups will experience varying degrees of success (speed) with TV Apps. The issue is on their end, not ours. It's the same with downloading VOD - I believe D*'s download speed is capped at times anyway. Streaming is an entirely different animal.

    You already said that you know wireless 'N' or powerline adapters will not be as 'fast' as hard wired. Very true. The good news is that all you really need is 'fast enough' AND 'consistent' speed for streaming.

    The 'consistent' piece is the key for HD streaming. The connection should not vary up and down in speed while watching.

    Unfortunately there is no way to predict if either solution will be 'fast enough' or 'consistent' enough to work well for you. Your mileage will vary trying either solution because of too many factors to list here.

    Here are the odds: Powerline may give you better results than wireless. (It also may not). But, if you want to try them one at a time, try that first.

    Another thought I'm having is to suggest you hire someone to fish ethernet for you. Use the money you would spend on 'N' and/or powerline to do that. It seems that the rest of your wireless devices are working fine, so the wireless piece of your network doesn't really need an upgrade.

    Good luck.
     
  18. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I had a room that I thought would be damn near impossible to get an Ethernet wire into and I tried all the things you list to go wireless and they just don't work as well as a hard wire Ethernet connection. So I bit the bullet and found a way into my viewing room with an Ethernet wire. Can't beat the hard wire solution.

    Rich
     
  19. bcab17

    bcab17 Mentor

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    Thank you. You make some excellent points, and since wireless N or Powerline options will cost from $100 to $150, it certainly makes sense to consider putting that money towards hiring someone to snake ethernet to my home theater. The question is who.

    My guess is that custom home theater installers won't mess with such a small job (or they'll charge a premium to do it). Electricians snake wire all the time, but it seems like overkill to pay a certified electrician for this type of job. I wonder if alarm company installers might do this. BB's Geek Squad?

    Any other suggestions for a "reasonably priced" installer?
     
  20. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    A 'friend of a friend', telephone guy or electrician. You just really need someone who has done it before, or you can watch this video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5o7l1_pRFkU


    For $100 you could get all the tools you'll need to do it yourself!
     

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