Bollywood "HELLO" new movie

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by boba, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. boba

    boba Hall Of Fame

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    According to the "The Dallas Morning News" Bollywood has released a new movie about Indian call centers. To me the most astounding revelation is "A 35-year-old American's brain and IQ is the same as a 10-year-old Indian's,"

    Is there anymore reason for DISH to get rid of their Indian call centers.
     
  2. TulsaOK

    TulsaOK New Member

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    There are two ways of looking at that, you know. Maybe a 35 year old American really isn't smarter than a 5th grader. :)
     
  3. Nick

    Nick Charter Gold Club Member DBSTalk Club

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    Doesn't say much for 10-year-old Indians now, does it? :sure:
     
  4. n0aaa

    n0aaa Cool Member

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    Watch Ch. 9407 some time to see what many Indians prefer for entertainment. It seems like something a 10-year-old might like. I sure find it boring quickly! -N0AAA
     
  5. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Worth keeping in mind that IQ loses its meaning after adulthood.

    IQ being an attempt to calculate mental maturity/intelligence vs actual age has meaning in youth... If a 6 year old is reading/comprehending/etc at the level of a 12 year old this is very meaningful! But a 35 year old reading/comprehending at the level of a 60 year old? What would that even mean?

    General consensus is that during childhood and into the teenage years intelligence potential can continue to grow (or diminish as the case may be)... so a smart child can get smarter and improve his potential... but this does not continue indefinately into adulthood... So a young child with a high IQ should be encouraged and helped to develop full potential to be used in adulthood... but measuring an IQ of an adult is all but meaningless really since relative intelligence levels after maturity does not carry the same meaning.
     
  6. satexplorer

    satexplorer Superstar

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    Indians are motivated in a call center than their chores in their village. Quit flaming their work. They never get the time to correct their English speaking.
     
  7. Nick

    Nick Charter Gold Club Member DBSTalk Club

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    Never? How do you know that?
     
  8. Taco Lover

    Taco Lover Icon

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    Am I reading that correctly? So, a 10-year-old Indian has the same brain and IQ as a 35-year-old American? So is the American really as smart as a 10-year-old Indian or is the Indian, at age 10, as smart as a 35-year-old American? If the latter, then why get rid of Indian call centers? :confused:
     
  9. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Ok. So I had to Google this one as context is everything. Yes, according to the review in the Washington Post there is this scene:
    It also says:
    Indeed, I can imagine the call center experiences and the humor. The movie sounds like it would be funny and sad.
     
  10. jclewter79

    jclewter79 Hall Of Fame

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    Wow, if those call center guys are so smart, you would think they would demand a better wage for their work.
     
  11. TulsaOK

    TulsaOK New Member

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    Maybe he's been to their "villages" and their huts. :)
    How many Americans bother to learn another language? I worked with a group from India (database engineers) and they knew our language better than most of the Americans. Example: check some of the posts in this forum.
     
  12. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    There are people who like to bash all "foreign" sounding CSRs, even though I find many American CSRs to be similarly lacking in comprehension and/or ability to improvise beyond their scripts.

    Also, if I experience a poor CSR experience it might be a bad CSR. If I experience many bad CSR experiences with different CSRs, then at that point I squarely blame the company who is hiring/contracting.

    From experience I know full well that many companies to not train nor follow-up when they hire people or contract out the work... and while it's easy to blame the CSR, and perhaps ask why they aren't self-motivated to improve... ultimately the lack of training and continued employment is the sole responsibility of the company.

    I use my restaurant example... a bad waitress means a bad waitress. Many bad waitresses means bad management. Many bad managers means bad corporation.
     
  13. jbrooks987

    jbrooks987 AllStar

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    Unfortunately the inability to improvise beyond their scripts is most likely an intense desire to remain employed. Many companies, even those who hire an outsource vendor, stress that all employees must follow the script exactly. To do otherwise creates a situation like that apparently existing at DISH -- call back until you find someone willing to take a chance of losing his/her job.

    (edited for spelling)
     
  14. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    That's true. But the difference between the CSR role at Dish and the counter person at MacDonald's is substantial once you get beyond "may I take your order."

    :rant:

    A Big Mac is a Big Mac in Petaluma, CA and Maplesville, AL and Yarmouth, ME. Not so with your HD locals in those places. So after the first CSR follows the script which couldn't possibly be clear about those differences, the angry customer calls back and doesn't want fries as a substitute for the missing second burger on the Big Mac after the second CSR argues for 3 minutes and then realizes there's only one burger in Maplesville, AL even though the bun still has a top, a middle, and a bottom just like the picture on the billboard in Yarmouth.

    The difference is how much importance Dish places on customer service versus marketing versus engineering, none one of which can survive without the other. In the past five years, Dish seemed to have forgotten customer service and marketing. Now all of a sudden they've forgotten engineering and continue to forget customer service. Instead they've allowed marketing to take over decision making in an attempt to make up for poor management decisions overall. (No one really needs one expensive 1080p movie available to rent when incompatible technology rules the field.)

    CSR's should (1) be experienced Dish Network customers which means they have to be in the US and (2) be able to think beyond a script about creating customer satisfaction which means creating a stable base of employees.

    In today's world, the ability to adapt to changing market conditions and to changing technology must be found in the CEO and the CSR. It may take 5 decades for a huge company to fail such as some of the American auto firms, but Dish isn't that huge.

    For Dish in this market, upon receiving a complaint the first thing a CSR or TSR should do is offer a "Gee I'm really sorry, let me credit your account $10 and we'll see what else we can do." Instead, you're apparently most likely to be told your ViP722 can only record one HD program at a time by someone who apparently has never spent one week trying to watch TV using one. So all that's left is "CSR roulette" and once they stop that, it's "new provider roulette" for way too many customers.

    :rant:
     
  15. Slamminc11

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    This has got to be one of the most stupid threads...oh never mind, not worth it. :nono2:
     
  16. jbrooks987

    jbrooks987 AllStar

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    Not necessarily. in both cases the CSR's job is to provide the "menu" of choices, take the consumers order OR pass the customer to the correct department for the resolution of the specific issue.

    CSR's, and TSR's have very different role's - but those roles are very narrowly defined. And IF each stays within the scripts given, resolution can be positive and swift.
     
  17. brant

    brant Icon

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    America is the greatest country on this earth, and so is its language. Don't criticize an American for not learning another country's language. Unless you plan on traveling to a specific country for an extended time, there's no need to learn its language, other than for sheer enjoyment or personal satisfaction.
     
  18. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    My entire family speaks English as a first language.

    I speak French well, German passably and Italian less passably than German.

    My brother speaks Russian and Spanish well, understands German and has been making an effort to learn Italian. He's learned some Japanese but found it too difficult.

    My sister speaks Spanish passably, but it can be argued that she uses it the least amongst the three of us.

    I'm a network admin with a degree in vocal music, my brother is an aspiring automotive designer with International Business and Industrial Design degrees, and my sister is a professional HR rep and career counselor with a degree in Sociology.

    Plenty of Americans learn other languages. Don't paint us all with the same brush.
     
  19. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I don't entirely disagree with your sentiment... but would counter that lots of people in other countries probably think their country is great too, so I'm not sure I march with the "we are the greatest country in the world" part... I don't want to live anywhere else and am glad to have been born here, but I hesitate to go "greatest ever" on other people without living in their countries for a while for comparison.

    Meanwhile... everything you said actually applies just as well to the folks in the foreign call support centers... they have no direct incentive to learn either as long as US companies are willing to pay them without training them.

    I have job/professional pride... but even I admit that there have been times when my employer provided no incentive (and sometimes actually hindered) to grow and so I stagnated and continued doing the job that was requested and not necessarily the best I could.
     
  20. TulsaOK

    TulsaOK New Member

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    Wow, I think that just answered my question.
     

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