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Broadband address incorrect

Discussion in 'Hopper System Support Forum' started by wings515, May 17, 2012.

  1. wings515

    wings515 Cool Member

    19
    0
    Jan 22, 2009
    Just got the Hopper and Joey and my last question was answered quickly. This revealed the colored buttons and their functions. When investigating the Braodband icon I see the address of the Hopper is 169.254.189.219 with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. I see packets being sent so communication is trying to be established. Most of the networks that I have worked on for home use, using the Cisco/Linksys router, are the 192.168.1.X with a 255.255.255.0 mask. With the 169 class network the DHCP server will not assign an available address when my router is at 192.

    I tried resetting my router, the Hopper Reset Connection and Reset Network with no success. How do you change the address and mask on the Hopper to enable the network?

    Best regards,
    wings515
     
  2. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

    2,129
    7
    Apr 8, 2009
    Firstly, the 169 address indicates that the Hopper is not getting DHCP information from the router. The 169 is an auto-assigned address that the device issues when it cannot connect to a DHCP server.

    If the connection is wired, then plug a laptop into the cable the Hopper is using and see if that gets properly addressed.

    Also make sure that the router is set up to be the DHCP server and that your other computers aren't using static addressing. You'll also want to make sure that the DHCP pool is large enough to accommodate additional devices.

    If you're using wireless, then make sure that you enter the access password correctly and make sure that the access point (router) isn't set to filter by MAC address.
    You can also troubleshoot wireless by temporarily disabling wireless security and seeing if it will connect to an open network.

    There are numerous possibilities here, and more information about how you're connecting and your home network would be helpful.
     
  3. wings515

    wings515 Cool Member

    19
    0
    Jan 22, 2009
    Thanks for the reply. First, the cat 5 connection worked on my 722 Rx. The port on the router connected to the Hopper has a flashing green LED that is in sync with all other green LED's.
    I will connect my laptop to the cable and verify cvonnectivity.
    Question, can the Hopper connect via wireless? I do have a wireless router that other pc's use to get onto the web. This will free up a port on my router if I can connect wirelessly.

    Thanks
     
  4. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

    2,129
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    Apr 8, 2009
    Your installer should have made sure all of this was working before he left.
    Yes, they can setup for wireless use if you don't have a wired network. I'm not sure how they accomplish it, but my installer said he was relieved to see that I had an existing wired network.

    You get more ports by plugging a small 4-5 port switch into one of the existing router LAN ports, then plug in additional devices to the switch.

    If the laptop connects, verify that it's not setup for static addressing and that it's getting all IP configuration via DHCP from the router. It's not likely that a home network would have static addressing, but I've seen all kinds of weird things out there.

    Also see http://www.mydish.com/support/setup-broadband
     
  5. wings515

    wings515 Cool Member

    19
    0
    Jan 22, 2009
    Well I went and checked the cable connectivity using my laptop. It was set for DHCP and when I connected the cable I was able to get onto the intenet. I did an 'ipconfig' and all was good. I disconnected the cable from my laptop and re-connected it to the Hopper, went to the Broadband icon and it showed an IP and Mask that was part of my network.
    Can not troubleshoot something that is working!

    As in all Netowrk problems the fix is PFM.....Pure F Magic

    Thanks to all
    Regards,
    wings515
     
  6. Wire Nut

    Wire Nut Legend

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    Apr 6, 2012
    Magic is science we do not yet understand. I'm happy to be stupid enough to see magic every day:D
     
  7. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

    2,129
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    Apr 8, 2009
    It could be an intermittent physical issue, which is where most networking problems occur. Keep an eye on it. If it fails again then it would be wise to check connections.
     
  8. May 3, 2016 #8 of 14
    jeff d

    jeff d New Member

    26
    2
    Feb 10, 2015
    Digging this up because I've got questions about the 169.254 addresses too.

    While I agree with the 169. comment in general, what I'm seeing doesn't make sense.

    After restarting all the equipment I get the 169.254 addresses for each of my DTV boxes. DHCP is up and running, in fact each of the DTV MACs gets an IP in the LAN range and later gets one in the 169.254 range.


    I get lots of these PNP SSDP messages from each of the receivers, but the router ignores because of the address being used:

    May 3 00:45:59 unknown daemon.warn miniupnpd[11734]: SSDP packet sender 169.254.220.111:49152 not from a LAN, ignoring
    May 3 00:47:02 unknown daemon.warn miniupnpd[11734]: SSDP packet sender 169.254.231.147:49152 not from a LAN, ignoring
    May 3 01:00:11 unknown daemon.warn miniupnpd[11734]: SSDP packet sender 169.254.181.103:49152 not from a LAN, ignoring

    The ARP table looks like this while this is going on....

    C:\Users\Jeff>arp -a
    Internet Address Physical Address Type
    192.168.0.210 70-76-30-aa-bb-cc dynamic
    192.168.0.211 00-18-9b-qq-tt-ss dynamic
    192.168.0.212 00-26-24-xx-yy-zz dynamic



    After a while, these addresses make their way into the ARP table and the entries include:
    C:\Users\Jeff>arp -a
    Internet Address Physical Address Type
    169.254.181.103 00-26-24-xx-yy-zz dynamic
    169.254.220.111 00-18-9b-qq-rr-ss dynamic
    169.254.231.147 70-76-30-aa-bb-cc dynamic
    192.168.0.210 70-76-30-aa-bb-cc dynamic
    192.168.0.211 00-18-9b-qq-tt-ss dynamic
    192.168.0.212 00-26-24-xx-yy-zz dynamic


    that doesn't look good!

    Anyone have any idea why these boxes which have just been restarted are using these 169.254 even after DHCP requests have been made and filled?
     
  9. May 3, 2016 #9 of 14
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,626
    391
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    As explained earlier... the "169.x.x.x" addresses are what devices typically self-assign when no other configuration option is available. So, if configured for DHCP and that fails, then the device defaults to a self-assigned IP that is essentially useless for our purposes.

    The DHCP server could have issues, the router/gateway could have issues, the Dish receiver could have issues, you could have bad cabling, and other combinations including things that lead to intermittent failures. Something is definitely going on, though, if this is happening regularly.
     
  10. jeff d

    jeff d New Member

    26
    2
    Feb 10, 2015
    crap, just realized I'm in a Dish tread, I'll create one for my hardware...
     
  11. nmetro

    nmetro Godfather

    946
    54
    Jul 11, 2006
    I just used wireless on mine, and entered the password to the SSID; and DHCP, from the my ASUS router did the rest. The Hopper allows fro both a wired and wireless set up, as do the Joeys. I agree with teh first reply, that DISH did not check the network settings before leaving.

    If using wired, you may eb able to set up a network connection by entering the IP of your router and setting the DNS to the router IP. Also, set up an IP within your network.
     
  12. Blowgun

    Blowgun DHMO User

    1,095
    43
    May 23, 2008
    Western Arc
    Unfortunately, the Hopper only allows for dynamic configurations. I wish that wasn't the case as I would have preferred to set up static IP addresses for them like all of my other network devices. Unless something has drastically changed with the Hopper 3, in general Hoppers have very limited network settings. Perhaps the other brand of hardware has more options?
     
  13. nmetro

    nmetro Godfather

    946
    54
    Jul 11, 2006
    Good question. The Hopper 2 has limitations you speak of. It almost sound like the router is not advertising its DHCP server, or it is, but the proper SSID/Password was not entered properly. Or, they are too far away for the router and cannot make a proper connection. The only time I have seen a 169.x.x.x address, was before I set up the Hopper over wireless, then once it connected; it assigned an IP in my home network in the 192.168.100.x range.
     
  14. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    59
    Apr 22, 2002
    Youngsville NC
    In the case of a piece of network gear that is DHCP only - the way to give it a static IP address is to do a reservation in the DHCP server based on MAC address.
     

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