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Building Cars In China

Discussion in 'The OT' started by AllieVi, Apr 21, 2005.

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  1. Bogy

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    Since I brought up the DeLorean, inadvertently, my favorite picture of the car was the Car & Driver (Road and Track?) cover when it first was introduced. It showed a DeLorean sitting out behind a barn, up on blocks, a few bullet holes in the fenders, grass growing through the floor, but that stainless steel was still shining. :)
     
  2. ntexasdude

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    IIRC wasn't the Bricklin a "kit" car that you bolted a VW bug chasis?
     
  3. Richard King

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    Nah, a Bricklin used a Ford chassis and Ford drive chain. An article that I read about it said it used a 351 Windsor engine. Assembly was done in Canada.
     
  4. ntexasdude

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    Maybe I was thinking of a Bradley and not a Bricklin. :p
     
  5. RichW

    RichW Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Back to topic. China has the fastest growing automobile market in the world right now. Their brand of capitalism/socialism has skyrocketed the standard of liviong there and demand for autos is currently exceeding the supply. Hence it makes good sense to set up manufacturing there... and to export the product as well.
     
  6. AllieVi

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    I agree 100%. Any of the world's car manufacturers that don't move there will regret it in the future. Cars designed, engineered and fully-assembled in China by Chinese companies are not going to be available in the near future, but eventually they will. When it happens, the other manufacturers will be hard-pressed to compete on price unless they're already building cars there. We have a good example to cite - the early Toyotas, Datsuns (Nissans) and Hondas were pathetic and few thought they would survive. The same can be said for the Korean cars that have now gained respect.

    Lots of components are made in China now. They're going through the fits and starts of learning how to make such things. I've read that their quality in this area isn't up to our standards - yet.
     
  7. Richard King

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    Probably. The Bradley was a kit car that dropped onto a VW bug chassis. It was originally made in Minneapolis and I used to see a bunch of them running around the streets of Minneapolis. Bradely info http://www.priceofhistoys.com/simon/page21.html
     
  8. Richard King

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    Yes, they will. See the Bricklin discussion above. The car he is bringing in is a Chinese car that has been brought up to required American standards. This will be available in 2007
     
  9. ntexasdude

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    There a lot of things the Chinese can't manufacture. I'm aware of a small gear you can hold in your hand that's manufactured in the US and used on a US nuclear (not noo-ku-ler) submarine. The gear is machined to incredible tolerances and then lapped and polished for noiseless running. The gear cost $34,000 and was shopped all over the world but no one could manufacture it except a certain US company.

    One of my former companies did a fair amount of business with China in mechanical components for machinery. Their "high tech" factories are laughable. The Chinese have a long way to go in the quality control department. They'll catch up though and they'll do it quick.

    What worries me is, in this country, is the shift away from manufacturing and exporting. We import too much and our trade deficit is too high. The long term implications for the health of our economy aren't so good.

    I read a book on China recently. Their government has realized that communism is doomed. Very secretly and slowly they are converting their country into a capatilist society. They have started to allow local cities to elect mayors and local councils finally realizing that a gigantic central gov't is just not pratical anymore.

    The Chinese are not our friends. They are only interested in selling us goods and taking our dollars.
     
  10. Laverne

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    I couldn't agree more! I'm very careful to buy things like drill bits that ONLY say "Made in USA". Several years ago I was in a pinch and needed several bits, etc. Didn't want to pay $5+ apiece for them, so I bought a Black & Decker set (Made in China). Completely worthless! Each bit I tried to use, if it had any strain on it at all snapped right in two. Yes, definitely a LONG way to go in quality control. Course, now I usually just buy Craftsman....
     
  11. bavaria72

    bavaria72 I am one too! DBSTalk Gold Club

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    "Word up"! A very worrisome "battle" brewing. Assuming they don't destroy the world with their blatant disregard for the ecology.
     
  12. Richard King

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    ??? I must be getting old.
     
  13. Laverne

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    Must be! :D I guess you never heard "Word Up" by Cameo? :shrug: Not the origination, but serves as a halfway decent explanation. ;)
     
  14. ntexasdude

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    I think it must mean something like "word to the wise" which my grandparents always said. I guess we're not as hip and cool like Bavaria72...........or our children. :D

    I mentioned earlier they eat kittens, which is quite true. I recall seeing an America Undercover episode on HBO years ago that showed them cooking and eating cats in a rural restaurant. The kittens were kept in bamboo cages and customers got to chose their dinner much like we might pick out our lobster. They were basically boiled alive and then barbecued. Pets are not the norm in China. Dogs and cats don't roam the streets, they get eaten because there are such severe food shortages. Royalty and government officials are some of the only ones who actually can afford to have pets.

    My point about the kittens is not to repulse or disgust anybody. It is simply their paradigm. A dog or a cat is just another source of nutrients. We eat certain animals here that would seem unthinkable in other countries. Rattlesnake, for example, is common "down" here.

    China is known, of course, for streaks of brilliance. The 3 Gorges dam for example, despite the political, socio-economic ramifications remains as one the greatest engineering feats of modern history.
     
  15. bavaria72

    bavaria72 I am one too! DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I'm trying to be hip. Laverne is the "Party Babe" here. When you have a 17 year old and a 14 year, you have to stay cutting edge! (I still love Cameo!) Allow me to translate - "I concur completely". :D
     
  16. Bogy

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    I heard an interview with Thomas Friedman earlier tonite. He was telling about how he went to China with his daughter not long ago. He told her that they would be able to rent bikes in the city (I don't remember now which city he specifically mentioned) and use the bike lanes to sightsee. He had not been in three years. The bike lanes were gone and riding a bike in the streets would have been suicidal. Everyone had a car.
     
  17. AllieVi

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    I'm aware of that car being imported (it was in the news a good while back), but I doubt it will be a market success. The primary benefit to the Chinese will be the opportunity to find out what it takes to sell a world-class car in an open market in competition with the likes of Toyota.

    It will take a long time for their thousands of parts suppliers to reliably achieve the high level of quality demanded today. It will happen eventually, but I'm not convinced they'll get it right on the first try.
     
  18. Richard King

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    Groovy
     
  19. Richard King

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    I suspect the same was said when he brought his first foreign car to the US, a tiny little thing with a 356 cc air-cooled 2-cylinder 2-cycle rear engine. He set up a bunch of dealerships across the country, just as he did with his failed Yugo venture. As opposed to the Yugo however, the Subaru became a great success. I have a feeling the Chinese car has a better chance to be compared to the Subaru than it does to the Yugo. I hope I am wrong though.
     
  20. Bogy

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    Korea had a little trouble the first time out, but they seem to be learning fast.
     
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